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Why Did a Tennessee Grade School Ban Pork?

Posted by on Aug. 16, 2013 at 5:19 PM
  • 251 Replies
A Tennessee elementary school banned students from eating ham sandwiches, BLT’s and anything else made with pork, but eventually lifted the ban after parents complained. Third grade teachers at Sunset Elementary School in Brentwood, Tenn. sent home an “Approved Snack List” for the school year and it specifically banned anything that comes from a pig.snacklist “No meats containing pork,” read the memorandum. “Starting Monday, August 12, 2013 your child must provide their own snack from the above approved snack list.” Kids could nosh on raw vegetables without dips or sauces, fresh fruit, crackers, pretzels, and popcorn – but no ribs or pork rinds. “Only choose a food from the following list to bring into school for snack,” the memorandum stated in bold-face type. “No other food items are permitted.” One day after the pork ban went into effect, Williamson County Schools posted a message on their Facebook page telling parents to ignore the rules. “Schools should only be offering suggested snack choices, and that information will be sent home only if your child is in a classroom where there is a food allergy,” the district stated. “Any reference to not allowing pork products in school is incorrect. Please disregard.” The district said the point of the memorandum was to address food allergies and approved snack lists. The memorandum did not explain why the school had become a pork-free zone, leading to lots of confusion among parents. “I’ve never heard of a life-threatening pork allergy,” one parent wrote on Facebook. The no-pork rule generated lots of conversation on Nashville’s talk radio stations and a number of callers and several hosts wondered if it had something to do with students who might be Muslim. “Typical list for a Madrassa,” wrote Nashville radio host Michael DelGiorno on his Facebook page. “If you think this has anything to do with something besides appeasing Muslims then you are either stupid or willfully ignorant,” one of his listeners wrote. “Is this school system trying to satisfy a religion?” another listener asked. “I see a big red flag here.”
by on Aug. 16, 2013 at 5:19 PM
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mariekay
by on Aug. 16, 2013 at 5:26 PM

Can you please post a link to the source?  I'm originally from that area and am curious to read more into it.  Thanks.

12hellokitty
by Platinum Member on Aug. 16, 2013 at 5:35 PM
1 mom liked this

Quoting mariekay:

Can you please post a link to the source?  I'm originally from that area and am curious to read more into it.  Thanks.


http://radio.foxnews.com/toddstarnes/top-stories/why-did-a-tennessee-grade-school-ban-pork.html
katy_kay08
by on Aug. 16, 2013 at 5:38 PM

So OP, do you agree with the opinion that it was done to "appease Muslims?"

 

katy_kay08
by on Aug. 16, 2013 at 5:40 PM

Pork allergies do exist and stem from a common allergen.  

Pork-cat syndrome a rare (but real!) allergy

Allergic to cats? Then beware of pigs -- or at least, the meat that comes from these sty-dwelling swine. A small number of people who are sensitive to felines may also get allergic reactions to eating pork.

Dubbed "pork-cat syndrome," this food-induced allergic reaction can occur after consuming pork in people who are also allergic to cats, says Jonathon Posthumus, MD, a fellow in the division of asthma, allergy and immunology at the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville.

Although this rare syndrome was first recognized in Europe in the mid-1990s, Posthumus and his colleagues recently described the first six documented cases of it in the U.S. He presented his preliminary findings at the annual meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

According to Posthumus, the true allergen in people with pork-cat syndrome is albumin, a protein that's found in both cat dander and in pork meat. When albumin is consumed in a pork-containing meal it can trigger an allergic reaction in sensitive individuals.

But not all people who are allergic to cat dander are sensitive to cat albumin. So, most cat-allergic individuals would probably not have reactions to pork. 

In this research, five out of six cases of pork-cat syndrome were seen in women, and the average age of those with this rare food sensitivity was 28. Blood tests were positive for cat dander and pork antibodies in all six people.

Following a meal containing pork, one person reported having an itchy mouth, three broke out in hives, and two had anaphylaxis, a severe and sometimes life-threatening allergic reaction. 

People with this syndrome may also develop swelling of the mouth, lips or tongue, and these same areas could become itchy after consuming pork products. Posthumus suspects the reaction may be related to how much pork is on your plate, but he says, there is no way to determine the threshold amount that triggers these symptoms.

Those diagnosed with this unusual food hypersensitivity are advised to steer clear of eating pork, and told what signs to look for and treatments to seek if they accidentally slip-up.

The UVA scientists discovered the country's first reported cases while researching people with meat allergies. Perhaps pork-cat syndrome has been under-recognized in the U.S. because "it can easily be missed if the patient is not properly evaluated and the relationship to cat allergy is not appreciated," Posthumus points out.

Readers, if you've ever experienced these strange sensations after eating pork, we have to hear about it. Leave us a comment telling us your story.

Della529
by Matlock on Aug. 16, 2013 at 5:48 PM
4 moms liked this

 Could have been done to "appease" Jewish people, but that would be fine.

Quoting katy_kay08:

So OP, do you agree with the opinion that it was done to "appease Muslims?"

 

 

katy_kay08
by on Aug. 16, 2013 at 5:51 PM
4 moms liked this

it cracks me up that people think the only group that is against pork are Muslims.  Seventh Day Adventists also believe the consumption of pork is taboo.  

Quoting Della529:

 Could have been done to "appease" Jewish people, but that would be fine.

Quoting katy_kay08:

So OP, do you agree with the opinion that it was done to "appease Muslims?"

 

 


lilblu399
by Bronze Member on Aug. 16, 2013 at 5:52 PM
4 moms liked this
What parent would give their child pork rinds as a snack?
My son's school banned them as well, nobody threw a tantrum.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
karlie2
by Member on Aug. 16, 2013 at 5:54 PM
1 mom liked this
Aren't. they vegetarian?


Quoting katy_kay08:

it cracks me up that people think the only group that is against pork are Muslims.  Seventh Day Adventists also believe the consumption of pork is taboo.  

Quoting Della529:

 Could have been done to "appease" Jewish people, but that would be fine.


Quoting katy_kay08:


So OP, do you agree with the opinion that it was done to "appease Muslims?"


 


 



autodidact
by Platinum Member on Aug. 16, 2013 at 5:55 PM
1 mom liked this

stopped reading at the first lie. didn't make it to the second line. 

katy_kay08
by on Aug. 16, 2013 at 5:57 PM
1 mom liked this

I believe that part of their teaching is to recommend (but not enforce) a Vegetarian diet but the teaching do enforce a Kosher diet.  

Quoting karlie2:

Aren't. they vegetarian?


Quoting katy_kay08:

it cracks me up that people think the only group that is against pork are Muslims.  Seventh Day Adventists also believe the consumption of pork is taboo.  

Quoting Della529:

 Could have been done to "appease" Jewish people, but that would be fine.


Quoting katy_kay08:


So OP, do you agree with the opinion that it was done to "appease Muslims?"


 


 




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