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Narendra Dabholkar has been assassinated!

Posted by on Aug. 20, 2013 at 6:26 PM
  • 11 Replies

Dr Dabholkar was a strong proponent of the Maharashtra Eradication of Black Magic, Evil and Aghori Practices Bill (also known as the Anti-Jaadu Tona Bill) being debated in India.

He was assassinated today (August 20th) at 7:20 AM, on his way to a meeting to speak in support of the bill.

The bill would have made it illegal:

    To perform Karni, Bhanamati,
    To perform magical rites in the name of supernatural power,
    To offer ash, talisman, charms etc. for the purpose of exorcism and to drive out evil  spirits or ghosts,
    To claim possession of supernatural powers and to advertise this claim,
    To defame, disgrace the names of erstwhile Saints/ Gods, by claiming to be there reincarnation and thus cheating the gullible and God-fearing simple folks.
    To claim to be possessed by divine power or evil power and then perform miracles in the name of such powers.
    To punish and to beat mentally ill patients in the belief that they are possessed by evil spirits.
    To perform Aghori rites.
    To perform so called black magic and spread fear in society.
    To perform "Gopal Santan Vidhi" to beget a male offspring.
    To oppose scientific medical treatment and to coerce to adopt Aghori treatment.
    To sell or deal in so-called magic stones, talisman, bracelets, charms.
    To become possessed by supernatural powers and then pretend to give answers to any questions in this mental state.
    To sacrifice innocent animals for the appeasement of gods or spirits.
    To dispense magical remedies for curing rabies and snake bites.
    To dispense medical remedies with claims of assured fertility.

by on Aug. 20, 2013 at 6:26 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Aug. 20, 2013 at 6:28 PM


PUNE: A doctor, a prolific speaker, a social activist, a writer and a kabaddi player in his youth... Narendra Dabholkar's life was certainly characterized by variety. But he was undoubtedly passionate about his mission against superstition, guided by a rationalist doctrine, which saw him relentlessly fight exploitation in the name of religion and for which he ultimately paid with his life.

Born in a progressive family on November 1, 1945, Dabholkar was the youngest of 10 siblings, which included six brothers and three sisters. His father Achyut was a prominent lawyer, while mother Tarabai was known for her rationalist thinking.

His eldest brother, Dr Devdatta Dabholkar, who died in 2010, was a Gandhian thinker and former vice-chancellor of the University of Pune. Another brother, Professor Shripad Dabholkar, who passed away in 2001, pioneered organic farming in the state and developed the 'Prayog Pariwar' methodology, which encourages people to solve their farming problems by sharing the results of their experiments. Yet another brother, Dr Dattaprasad Dabholkar, is a writer, activist and scientist.

Dabholkar's son Hamid, who is named after the progressive Muslim thinker and rationalist Hamid Dalwai, is a doctor and a social worker. Dabholkar's wife Shaila and daughter Mukta supported him throughout his mission.

After his primary and secondary education at New English School, Satara, Dabholkar went to Willingdon College in Sangli before joining Medical College, Miraj, from where he got his MBBS degree. In college, he was the captain of the Shivaji University kabaddi team and represented India against Bangladesh in a kabaddi tournament. He won nine gold medals in various national and international kabaddi tournaments.

Dabholkar practised as a general practitioner for nearly 12 years, after which he became active in social work. His first accomplishment in the field was the "One village, one drinking water well" movement with veteran activist Baba Adhav. Dabholkar and Adhav began an agitation across the state, demanding that wells be dug for Dalits in the villages.

Dabholkar was also the founder-member of a de-addiction centre, Parivartan, in Satara. This is the only institute of its kind serving the districts of Satara, Sangli, Kolhapur and Konkan.

He also edited the Marathi weekly 'Sadhana', which was started by the freedom-fighter and social worker Sane Guruji.

In 1983 Dabholkar started working for the eradication of superstition. In 1989, along with other like-minded people, he founded the Maharashtra Andhashraddha Nirmulan Samiti (committee for the eradication of blind faith).

Over the last two decades, Dabholkar actively participated in all major socio-political agitations in Maharashtra, including the movement against atrocities on Dalits, caste discrimination and the naming of Marathwada University after Dr B R Ambedkar. He wrote books on various aspects of superstitions and their eradication, and addressed over 3,000 public meetings and rallies to enlighten people.

Dabholkar took up causes by the score and had a busy schedule almost every day. On Tuesday morning, he was to address a press conference about holding an eco-friendly Ganesh festival. But fate deemed otherwise.

Since 1983, he was confronted time and again by many religious and spiritual gurus, and faced several threats and even physical attacks. But he rejected police protection for himself. "If I have to take police protection in my own country from my own people, then there is something wrong with me," he used to say. "I'm fighting within the framework of the Indian constitution and it is not against anyone, but for everyone."

Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Aug. 20, 2013 at 6:36 PM

The Aghoris distinguish themselves from other Hindu sects and priests by their alcoholic and cannibalistic rituals  The corpses, which may be either pulled from a river (such as the Ganges or obtained from cremation grounds, are consumed both raw and cooked on open flame.


the Aghoris maintain that all opposites are ultimately illusory. The purpose of embracing pollution and degradation through various customs is the realization of non-duality (Advaita) through transcending social taboos, attaining what is essentially an altered state of consciousness  and perceiving the illusory nature of all conventional categories.

Aghoris base their beliefs on two principles common to broader Shaivite dogma: that Shiva is perfect (omniscient, omnipresent, omnipotent, etc.) and that Shiva is responsible for everything that occurs – all conditions, causes and effects – in the phenomenal universe. Consequently, everything that exists must be perfect, and to deny the perfection of anything would be to deny the sacredness of all life in its full manifestation, as well as to deny the supreme being and the demigods' perfections.

Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Aug. 20, 2013 at 6:51 PM

Quoting Clairwil:

To perform "Gopal Santan Vidhi" to beget a male offspring.

Take the example of the Putrakameshti Yadnya (Yadnya that
promises a son). It is an established fact that the gender of the foetus is
decided when the sperm penetrates into the egg and forms an embryo. No
one can change it afterwards nor can anyone choose it beforehand. Yet
there are some Maharaj who insist that performing a Putrakameshti
Yadnya guarantees the birth of a son and exploit those who believe in
them. These days a new form of propitiatory observance has been
tailored for those couples who want to change the female embryo (with
which the wife is already pregnant) into a male one. This special
ceremony is called Gopal-santan-vidhi in which the hopefuls have to part
with a large sum of thousands of rupees in advance. No need to say it is a
pure and simple fraud exploiting superstitious people.

Kate_Momof3
by Silver Member on Aug. 20, 2013 at 6:53 PM

 Wow. It sounds like he was a brave and good man. He went up against crazy fundamentalists (my Western-brain interpretation of who the Aghori are) and lost his life trying to protect people. Crazy indeed.

Kate_Momof3
by Silver Member on Aug. 20, 2013 at 6:55 PM

 I admittedly know nothing about this subculture, but it sounds comparable to some evangelical sects in this country, no?

Quoting Clairwil:

 

Quoting Clairwil:

To perform "Gopal Santan Vidhi" to beget a male offspring.

Take the example of the Putrakameshti Yadnya (Yadnya that
promises a son). It is an established fact that the gender of the foetus is
decided when the sperm penetrates into the egg and forms an embryo. No
one can change it afterwards nor can anyone choose it beforehand. Yet
there are some Maharaj who insist that performing a Putrakameshti
Yadnya guarantees the birth of a son and exploit those who believe in
them. These days a new form of propitiatory observance has been
tailored for those couples who want to change the female embryo (with
which the wife is already pregnant) into a male one. This special
ceremony is called Gopal-santan-vidhi in which the hopefuls have to part
with a large sum of thousands of rupees in advance. No need to say it is a
pure and simple fraud exploiting superstitious people.

 

 

Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Aug. 20, 2013 at 6:57 PM
Quoting Clairwil:

    To perform Karni, Bhanamati,


Bhanamati

Types of Bhanamati

This malady is of two types. In the first type, clothes get torn, or set on fire or houses get stoned or small bits of stones spill out of eyes and ears of the victim or cross marks (made by marking nuts) emerge on the body, all of a sudden, miraculously and on their own. Such occurrences become news and are widely discussed by the village folks. In fact some person does this out of desperation but intentionally. Obviously women hugely outnumber men in performing these desperate acts.

In the other type of Bhanamati the affected person starts puffing, blowing, panting and gasping or barks like a dog. The person also rolls violently and noisily on the floor. While in such stance that person reveals the name of somebody that has supposedly caused some incident detrimental to the people of that locality. The person so named becomes a suspect and is just not able to continue to live there. Moreover when one woman is so possessed many others, as if infected by her, start puffing and panting. It creates a very weird and frightening atmosphere. The rural, illiterate population of Marathwada is especially prone to become victims of this malady. At times even the educated people seem to believe in it..

Reasons attributed

In the past, diseases were rarely attributed to the physiological disorder. Many a times they were ascribed to some evil influence which was propitiated by some sacrifice. In such cases of illness the people hankered after magic and such magical practice as bhanamati. In most of the cases, the treatment was so severe that there was little hope of the survival of the patient. At present the people in the rural areas are sometimes the victims of such beliefs and ideas.

Eradication

The MANS have developed an effective technique of investigating into the Bhanamati occurrences. They take care not to disclose the identity of the person/s involved in it and offer them psychological support and treatment, so that person is no more in need of continuing this bizarre behaviour. The MANS has been struggling to eradicate this menace for the last two decades, creating awareness among the public and educating people regarding its causes, remedies and also who benefits from such activities. This movement coupled with the humane treatment given to the victims by the MANS workers has reduced the occurrence of this phenomenon considerably. MANS will continue its agitation till it is completely eradicated from the society, of course with the co-operation of all concerned.

______________________________________________________

In May last year, a five-year-old girl was skinned alive, and her limbs cut at Honnakiranagi village in Gulbarga taluk. This reportedly took place in full view of nearly 50 people of the village. The person who practiced bhanamati had convinced the girl’s parents that the girl was an ill omen to the village, and had to be sacrificed for the good of the village. The police, who came to know of the incident only two days after the incident, arrested 15 persons. However, all were released for lack of evidence.

On April 15, 2005, 11-year-old Sangamma at Matki village in Aland taluk of Gulbarga district suddenly caught fire when she had gone to answer nature’s call in the morning. As she had received more than 75 per cent burns, she was admitted to the District Government Hospital in Gulbarga, where she died 20 days later. As the people in Matki believed that the girl had died due to bhanamati reportedly practiced by Shivamma (40), a relative of the deceased girl, they caught her and handed her over to the police. However, Shivamma came out on bail the very next day, and is absconding ever since.

On November 10, 2005, the headless body of six-year-old Salitha was found in a field at Khajuri village in Aland taluk of Gulbarga district. Along with the head, the girl’s little finger on the right hand, the right-hand arm bone, one of her right ribs, right part of her hip bone, right thigh bone, and the complete skin from her upper body were missing. She too was killed reportedly by practitioners of bhanamati, allegedly for acquiring some kind of supernatural power.

A week later, her head was found by the police in a house in Aland. According to the practitioners of bhanamati, the skin, limbs, hair, and blood of small girls are needed to worship the devil. Devil worship is done in a graveyard on a new moon night. By doing so, they believe they would get the powers to practice bhanamati. And bhanamati is mainly used to trouble or kill others.

(source)

Aestas
by Gold Member on Aug. 20, 2013 at 7:24 PM
1 mom liked this

Those bhanamati stories are sickening. I'm having a hard time imagining how on earth someone convinced the parents of that five year old to allow her to be skinned alive. I would die before I allowed someone to harm my kids. I can't imagine how powerful and ingrained those beliefs must be for people to stand by and let such things happen. I had never heard of a lot of this stuff. I encountered lots of different religious beliefs while traveling in India, but nothing like that.

Do you know whether they've arrested anyone in this man's death? It sounds like India has lost a real champion of social justice and human rights.

annabl1970
by Platinum Member on Aug. 20, 2013 at 8:44 PM
Sick :(


Quoting Clairwil:


Quoting Clairwil:

    To perform Karni, Bhanamati,


Bhanamati


Types of Bhanamati


This malady is of two
types. In the first type, clothes get torn, or set on fire or houses get
stoned or small bits of stones spill out of eyes and ears of the victim
or cross marks (made by marking nuts) emerge on the body, all of a
sudden, miraculously and on their own. Such occurrences become news and
are widely discussed by the village folks. In fact some person does this
out of desperation but intentionally. Obviously women hugely outnumber
men in performing these desperate acts.


In the other type of
Bhanamati the affected person starts puffing, blowing, panting and
gasping or barks like a dog. The person also rolls violently and noisily
on the floor. While in such stance that person reveals the name of
somebody that has supposedly caused some incident detrimental to the
people of that locality. The person so named becomes a suspect and is
just not able to continue to live there. Moreover when one woman is so
possessed many others, as if infected by her, start puffing and panting.
It creates a very weird and frightening atmosphere. The rural,
illiterate population of Marathwada is especially prone to become
victims of this malady. At times even the educated people seem to
believe in it..


Reasons attributed


In the past, diseases were rarely
attributed to the physiological disorder. Many a times they were
ascribed to some evil influence which was propitiated by some sacrifice.
In such cases of illness the people hankered after magic and such
magical practice as bhanamati. In most of the cases, the treatment was
so severe that there was little hope of the survival of the patient. At
present the people in the rural areas are sometimes the victims of such
beliefs and ideas.


Eradication


The MANS have developed
an effective technique of investigating into the Bhanamati occurrences.
They take care not to disclose the identity of the person/s involved in
it and offer them psychological support and treatment, so that person is
no more in need of continuing this bizarre behaviour. The MANS has been
struggling to eradicate this menace for the last two decades, creating
awareness among the public and educating people regarding its causes,
remedies and also who benefits from such activities. This movement
coupled with the humane treatment given to the victims by the MANS
workers has reduced the occurrence of this phenomenon considerably. MANS
will continue its agitation till it is completely eradicated from the
society, of course with the co-operation of all concerned.


______________________________________________________

In May last year, a five-year-old girl was skinned alive, and her limbs
cut at Honnakiranagi village in Gulbarga taluk. This reportedly took
place in full view of nearly 50 people of the village. The person who
practiced bhanamati had convinced the girl’s parents that the girl was
an ill omen to the village, and had to be sacrificed for the good of the
village. The police, who came to know of the incident only two days
after the incident, arrested 15 persons. However, all were released for
lack of evidence.


On April 15, 2005, 11-year-old Sangamma at Matki village in Aland
taluk of Gulbarga district suddenly caught fire when she had gone to
answer nature’s call in the morning. As she had received more than 75
per cent burns, she was admitted to the District Government Hospital in
Gulbarga, where she died 20 days later. As the people in Matki believed
that the girl had died due to bhanamati reportedly practiced by Shivamma
(40), a relative of the deceased girl, they caught her and handed her
over to the police. However, Shivamma came out on bail the very next
day, and is absconding ever since.


On November 10, 2005, the headless body of six-year-old Salitha was
found in a field at Khajuri village in Aland taluk of Gulbarga district.
Along with the head, the girl’s little finger on the right hand, the
right-hand arm bone, one of her right ribs, right part of her hip bone,
right thigh bone, and the complete skin from her upper body were
missing. She too was killed reportedly by practitioners of bhanamati,
allegedly for acquiring some kind of supernatural power.


A week later, her head was found by the police in a house in Aland.
According to the practitioners of bhanamati, the skin, limbs, hair, and
blood of small girls are needed to worship the devil. Devil worship is
done in a graveyard on a new moon night. By doing so, they believe they
would get the powers to practice bhanamati. And bhanamati is mainly used
to trouble or kill others.

(source)


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
annabl1970
by Platinum Member on Aug. 20, 2013 at 8:45 PM
RIP


Quoting Clairwil:


PUNE: A doctor, a prolific speaker, a social activist, a writer and a kabaddi player in his youth... Narendra Dabholkar's life was certainly characterized by variety. But he was undoubtedly passionate about his mission against superstition, guided by a rationalist doctrine, which saw him relentlessly fight exploitation in the name of religion and for which he ultimately paid with his life.

Born in a progressive family on November 1, 1945, Dabholkar was the youngest of 10 siblings, which included six brothers and three sisters. His father Achyut was a prominent lawyer, while mother Tarabai was known for her rationalist thinking.

His eldest brother, Dr Devdatta Dabholkar, who died in 2010, was a Gandhian thinker and former vice-chancellor of the University of Pune. Another brother, Professor Shripad Dabholkar, who passed away in 2001, pioneered organic farming in the state and developed the 'Prayog Pariwar' methodology, which encourages people to solve their farming problems by sharing the results of their experiments. Yet another brother, Dr Dattaprasad Dabholkar, is a writer, activist and scientist.

Dabholkar's son Hamid, who is named after the progressive Muslim thinker and rationalist Hamid Dalwai, is a doctor and a social worker. Dabholkar's wife Shaila and daughter Mukta supported him throughout his mission.

After his primary and secondary education at New English School, Satara, Dabholkar went to Willingdon College in Sangli before joining Medical College, Miraj, from where he got his MBBS degree. In college, he was the captain of the Shivaji University kabaddi team and represented India against Bangladesh in a kabaddi tournament. He won nine gold medals in various national and international kabaddi tournaments.

Dabholkar practised as a general practitioner for nearly 12 years, after which he became active in social work. His first accomplishment in the field was the "One village, one drinking water well" movement with veteran activist Baba Adhav. Dabholkar and Adhav began an agitation across the state, demanding that wells be dug for Dalits in the villages.

Dabholkar was also the founder-member of a de-addiction centre, Parivartan, in Satara. This is the only institute of its kind serving the districts of Satara, Sangli, Kolhapur and Konkan.

He also edited the Marathi weekly 'Sadhana', which was started by the freedom-fighter and social worker Sane Guruji.

In 1983 Dabholkar started working for the eradication of superstition. In 1989, along with other like-minded people, he founded the Maharashtra Andhashraddha Nirmulan Samiti (committee for the eradication of blind faith).

Over the last two decades, Dabholkar actively participated in all major socio-political agitations in Maharashtra, including the movement against atrocities on Dalits, caste discrimination and the naming of Marathwada University after Dr B R Ambedkar. He wrote books on various aspects of superstitions and their eradication, and addressed over 3,000 public meetings and rallies to enlighten people.

Dabholkar took up causes by the score and had a busy schedule almost every day. On Tuesday morning, he was to address a press conference about holding an eco-friendly Ganesh festival. But fate deemed otherwise.

Since 1983, he was confronted time and again by many religious and spiritual gurus, and faced several threats and even physical attacks. But he rejected police protection for himself. "If I have to take police protection in my own country from my own people, then there is something wrong with me," he used to say. "I'm fighting within the framework of the Indian constitution and it is not against anyone, but for everyone."


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
JakeandEmmasMom
by Platinum Member on Aug. 20, 2013 at 8:54 PM
I'm normally someone who believes that all religious beliefs deserve respect. These practices absolutely do not deserve respect.

How sad.
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