Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Nestle CEO: Water is not a Human Right and should be Privatized

Posted by   + Show Post


Is water a free and basic human right, or should all the water on the planet belong to major corporations and be treated as a product? Should the poor who cannot afford to pay these said corporations suffer from starvation due to their lack of financial wealth? According to the former CEO and now Chairman of the largest food product manufacturer in the world, corporations should own every drop of water on the planet — and you’re not getting any unless you pay up.

The company notorious for sending out hordes of ‘internet warriors’ to defend the company and its actions online in comments and message boards (perhaps we’ll find some below) even takes a firm stance behind Monsanto’s GMOs and their ‘proven safety’. In fact, the former Nestle CEO actually says that his idea of water privatization is very similar to Monsanto’s GMOs. In a video interview, Nestle Chairman Peter Brabeck-Letmathe states that there has never been ‘one illness’ ever caused from the consumption of GMOs.

The way in which this sociopath clearly has zero regard for the human race outside of his own wealth and the development of Nestle, who has been caught funding attacks against GMO labeling, can be witnessed when watching and listening to his talk on the issue. This is a company that actually goes into struggling rural areas and extracts the groundwater for their bottled water products, completely destroying the water supply of the area without any compensation. In fact, they actually make rural areas in the United States foot the bill.

As reported on by Corporate Watch, Nestle and former CEO Peter Brabeck-Letmathe have a long history of disregarding public health and abusing the environment to take part in the profit of an astounding $35 billion in annual profit from water bottle sales alone. The report states:

“Nestlé production of mineral water involves the abuse of vulnerable water resources. In the Serra da Mantiqueira region of Brazil, home to the “circuit of waters” park whose groundwater has a high mineral content and medicinal properties, over-pumping has resulted in depletion and long-term damage.”

Nestle has also come under fire over the assertion that they are actually conducting business with massive slavery rings. Another Corporate Watch entry details:

“In 2001, Nestlé faced criticism for buying cocoa from the Ivory Coast and Ghana, which may have been produced using child slaves.[58] According to an investigative report by the BBC, hundreds of thousands of children in Mali, Burkina Faso and Togo were being purchased from their destitute parents and shipped to the Ivory Coast, to be sold as slaves to cocoa farms.”

So is water a human right, or should big corporations own it? Well, if water is not here for all of us, then perhaps major corporations should own air as well. And as for crops, Monsanto is already working hard to make sure their monopoly on our staple crops and beyond is well situated. It should really come as no surprise that this Nestle Chairman fights to keep Monsanto’s GMOs alive and well in the food supply, as his ideology lines right up with that of Monsanto.

LINK

Agree?

 


Thank God......it's Friday!!!

by on Aug. 21, 2013 at 1:43 PM
Replies (21-30):
Della529
by Matlock on Aug. 21, 2013 at 2:20 PM

 

Quoting Friday:


Quoting Della529:

 Personally I don't see most resources as "ownable" by any one.  And most of that water is crappy filtered-tap in the first place - why would anyone pay a dollar or more a bottle for it is beyond me.

We buy the big jugs of bottled water for drinking, our tap water is very hard and tastes terrible. Water shouldn't leave an aftertaste, blech. So I get why some use bottled water but since people don't make or grow water, and everyone needs it to live, I think privatizing it all is crazy.

 The five gallon jugs?  If so, they're reused, so they usually don't wind up in a landfill.  Last I checked, they weren't that expensive either.  When I was growing up, we had city water and my mom would put it in gallon jugs in the refrigerator overnight after aerating it.  It didn't remove the hardness, but it helped a bunch with the taste. 

Our water is super hard and has anaerobic bacteria which makes it stain everything and makes it smelly.  We have a well and water conditioning equipment.  Without it, I'd be using jug water, too.

Friday
by HRH of MJ on Aug. 21, 2013 at 2:22 PM


Quoting Clairwil:

Quoting Friday:

According to the former CEO and now Chairman of the largest food product manufacturer in the world, corporations should own every drop of water on the planet — and you’re not getting any unless you pay up.

Agree?

This is terrible journalism.

The article doesn't quote his exact words, let alone the context for those words.

Fair enough. Watching the video he seems to be for privatization and believes that people controlling the water will be more able to ensure that all who need it have it. I'm not sure I'm buying. I can see how it would be true but knowing how corporate greed works I doubt that it would actually happen that way.

 


Thank God......it's Friday!!!

Friday
by HRH of MJ on Aug. 21, 2013 at 2:24 PM


Quoting SuzCahn:

 What did the CEO actually say?

There's a video at the link with his statements. It's subtitled and a little glitchy but it worked. He seems to believe that privatizing water would be good and those in control of it would be better able to make sure those who need it, get it. Might be nice in theory but knowing corp greed I don't trust it.

 


Thank God......it's Friday!!!

Friday
by HRH of MJ on Aug. 21, 2013 at 2:25 PM


Quoting Clairwil:

Quoting Clairwil:

The article doesn't quote his exact words, let alone the context for those words.

Here, I've done the effort for you to find the context....

(source)

From time to time on the internet a video clip from a TV programme made in 2005 about food is posted in which I am talking about whether water is a human right.  It seems it has surfaced again, and people are using it to misrepresent my views on this important issue.

Let me be very clear about this again here on the blog, because I think the video clip, which took my views out of context, isn’t clear about the point I was trying to make.  The water you need for survival is a human right, and must be made available to everyone, wherever they are, even if they cannot afford to pay for it.
 
However I do also believe that water has a value. People using the water piped into their home to irrigate their lawn, or wash their car, should bear the cost of the infrastructure needed to supply it. 

I have posted about this in more detail before: 'Water is a human right - but not a free good'. Please take a look at that post if you would like to explore the arguments more fully, and of course leave a comment if you would like to join the debate.

I also talked about this topic at our Creating Shared Value Forum in India last year, see the film below.

Thank you for visiting my blog which I hope will give you a more balanced picture of where I stand on this issue.

Thank you for the info.

 


Thank God......it's Friday!!!

Woodbabe
by Woodie on Aug. 21, 2013 at 2:28 PM
1 mom liked this

Wow, when this subject was broached five years ago here on CM those of us who saw this as possible were seen as tin foil hat wearing conspiracy theorists. Its murmured that future wars will be fought over water rights for countries.

 Sexy If its unladylike, fattening or fun, I'm in!
  

jakesmom323
by on Aug. 21, 2013 at 2:31 PM
I do feel like water is a God given right but it does need to be treated for safety. These are not the days where you can have wells and drink from streams unfortunately:( In 3rd world countries, the sewage runs with their water. What am I taking about!!#???? Everyone's water is treated after sewage and waste! Its a cruel complex world these days and its a reality. This is sponsored by Nestle Carnation Breakfast drink..... just joking;)
Della529
by Matlock on Aug. 21, 2013 at 2:32 PM

 

Quoting Clairwil:

Quoting Clairwil:

The article doesn't quote his exact words, let alone the context for those words.

Here, I've done the effort for you to find the context....

(source)

From time to time on the internet a video clip from a TV programme made in 2005 about food is posted in which I am talking about whether water is a human right.  It seems it has surfaced again, and people are using it to misrepresent my views on this important issue.

Let me be very clear about this again here on the blog, because I think the video clip, which took my views out of context, isn’t clear about the point I was trying to make.  The water you need for survival is a human right, and must be made available to everyone, wherever they are, even if they cannot afford to pay for it.
 
However I do also believe that water has a value. People using the water piped into their home to irrigate their lawn, or wash their car, should bear the cost of the infrastructure needed to supply it. 

I have posted about this in more detail before: 'Water is a human right - but not a free good'. Please take a look at that post if you would like to explore the arguments more fully, and of course leave a comment if you would like to join the debate.

I also talked about this topic at our Creating Shared Value Forum in India last year, see the film below.

Thank you for visiting my blog which I hope will give you a more balanced picture of where I stand on this issue.

Preface:  I have not read the details. 

I did and do.  I paid to have the well drilled.  I paid to have the pipes to my home installed.  I paid to have the pump and water conditioning equipment installed.  I pay for the salt for the water conditioner.  I pay for the electricity to run the pump and the WC equipment.  And I pay stormwater run-off taxes.

I do not water my lawn - it's too large - and this is FL where it usually rains quite frequently.  I do not wash vehicles at my home - I have them washed at a green auto bath.

Friday
by HRH of MJ on Aug. 21, 2013 at 2:35 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting Della529:

 

Quoting Clairwil:

Quoting Clairwil:

The article doesn't quote his exact words, let alone the context for those words.

Here, I've done the effort for you to find the context....

(source)

From time to time on the internet a video clip from a TV programme made in 2005 about food is posted in which I am talking about whether water is a human right.  It seems it has surfaced again, and people are using it to misrepresent my views on this important issue.

Let me be very clear about this again here on the blog, because I think the video clip, which took my views out of context, isn’t clear about the point I was trying to make.  The water you need for survival is a human right, and must be made available to everyone, wherever they are, even if they cannot afford to pay for it.
 
However I do also believe that water has a value. People using the water piped into their home to irrigate their lawn, or wash their car, should bear the cost of the infrastructure needed to supply it. 

I have posted about this in more detail before: 'Water is a human right - but not a free good'. Please take a look at that post if you would like to explore the arguments more fully, and of course leave a comment if you would like to join the debate.

I also talked about this topic at our Creating Shared Value Forum in India last year, see the film below.

Thank you for visiting my blog which I hope will give you a more balanced picture of where I stand on this issue.

Preface:  I have not read the details. 

I did and do.  I paid to have the well drilled.  I paid to have the pipes to my home installed.  I paid to have the pump and water conditioning equipment installed.  I pay for the salt for the water conditioner.  I pay for the electricity to run the pump and the WC equipment.  And I pay stormwater run-off taxes.

I do not water my lawn - it's too large - and this is FL where it usually rains quite frequently.  I do not wash vehicles at my home - I have them washed at a green auto bath.

In the suburbs we pay for water and I'm sure the bill includes taxes and fees to cover maintaining the water infrastructure, and then some.

 


Thank God......it's Friday!!!

Della529
by Matlock on Aug. 21, 2013 at 2:49 PM

 

Quoting Friday:


Quoting Della529:

 

Quoting Clairwil:

Quoting Clairwil:

The article doesn't quote his exact words, let alone the context for those words.

Here, I've done the effort for you to find the context....

(source)

From time to time on the internet a video clip from a TV programme made in 2005 about food is posted in which I am talking about whether water is a human right.  It seems it has surfaced again, and people are using it to misrepresent my views on this important issue.

Let me be very clear about this again here on the blog, because I think the video clip, which took my views out of context, isn’t clear about the point I was trying to make.  The water you need for survival is a human right, and must be made available to everyone, wherever they are, even if they cannot afford to pay for it.
 
However I do also believe that water has a value. People using the water piped into their home to irrigate their lawn, or wash their car, should bear the cost of the infrastructure needed to supply it. 

I have posted about this in more detail before: 'Water is a human right - but not a free good'. Please take a look at that post if you would like to explore the arguments more fully, and of course leave a comment if you would like to join the debate.

I also talked about this topic at our Creating Shared Value Forum in India last year, see the film below.

Thank you for visiting my blog which I hope will give you a more balanced picture of where I stand on this issue.

Preface:  I have not read the details. 

I did and do.  I paid to have the well drilled.  I paid to have the pipes to my home installed.  I paid to have the pump and water conditioning equipment installed.  I pay for the salt for the water conditioner.  I pay for the electricity to run the pump and the WC equipment.  And I pay stormwater run-off taxes.

I do not water my lawn - it's too large - and this is FL where it usually rains quite frequently.  I do not wash vehicles at my home - I have them washed at a green auto bath.

In the suburbs we pay for water and I'm sure the bill includes taxes and fees to cover maintaining the water infrastructure, and then some.

 Yes, and your bill probably also includes fees for sewage treatment which is usually the majority of the cost on the bill.

This is partially why I do not trust Nestle.  City/County municipalities should handle our water sources and treatment, imo.

slashteddy
by Bronze Member on Aug. 21, 2013 at 2:55 PM
Shhh! He's just making good choices in his life! Don't criticize the rich, they worked hard for that money!

If this is something he actually said, it'll just add to the long list of reasons I avoid Nestle and affiliate products.
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)