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ok, my awesome book loving friends, I need some recommendations!

Posted by on Aug. 21, 2013 at 4:05 PM
  • 40 Replies
I need literature recommendations for a 10 year old who has a high school reading and comprehension level. I want books that will be challenging, but not have too mature content for her little mind.

Any suggestions?
by on Aug. 21, 2013 at 4:05 PM
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Replies (1-10):
tanyainmizzou
by on Aug. 21, 2013 at 4:09 PM

I read "Emma" when I was ten, but that isn't current.


However, I read a book by Neil Gaiman a couple of years ago called "The Graveyard Book."

It was really good and is classified as children's fantasy.


This is the amazon.com review


In The Graveyard Book, Neil Gaiman has created a charming allegory of childhood. Although the book opens with a scary scene--a family is stabbed to death by "a man named Jack” --the story quickly moves into more child-friendly storytelling. The sole survivor of the attack--an 18-month-old baby--escapes his crib and his house, and toddles to a nearby graveyard. Quickly recognizing that the baby is orphaned, the graveyard's ghostly residents adopt him, name him Nobody ("Bod"), and allow him to live in their tomb. Taking inspiration from Kipling’s The Jungle Book, Gaiman describes how the toddler navigates among the headstones, asking a lot of questions and picking up the tricks of the living and the dead. In serial-like episodes, the story follows Bod's progress as he grows from baby to teen, learning life’s lessons amid a cadre of the long-dead, ghouls, witches, intermittent human interlopers. A pallid, nocturnal guardian named Silas ensures that Bod receives food, books, and anything else he might need from the human world. Whenever the boy strays from his usual play among the headstones, he finds new dangers, learns his limitations and strengths, and acquires the skills he needs to survive within the confines of the graveyard and in wider world beyond. (ages 10 and up) -–Heidi Broadhead --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Jack_Squat
by Silver Member on Aug. 21, 2013 at 4:13 PM
Ooooh. She would love that. She loves ghostly things. Do you happen to know the reading level?


Quoting tanyainmizzou:

I read "Emma" when I was ten, but that isn't current.


However, I read a book by Neil Gaiman a couple of years ago called "The Graveyard Book."

It was really good and is classified as children's fantasy.


This is the amazon.com review


In The Graveyard Book, Neil Gaiman has created a charming
allegory of childhood. Although the book opens with a scary scene--a
family is stabbed to death by "a man named Jack” --the story quickly
moves into more child-friendly storytelling. The sole survivor of the
attack--an 18-month-old baby--escapes his crib and his house, and
toddles to a nearby graveyard. Quickly recognizing that the baby is
orphaned, the graveyard's ghostly residents adopt him, name him Nobody
("Bod"), and allow him to live in their tomb. Taking inspiration from
Kipling’s The Jungle Book, Gaiman describes how the toddler
navigates among the headstones, asking a lot of questions and picking up
the tricks of the living and the dead. In serial-like episodes, the
story follows Bod's progress as he grows from baby to teen, learning
life’s lessons amid a cadre of the long-dead, ghouls, witches,
intermittent human interlopers. A pallid, nocturnal guardian named
Silas ensures that Bod receives food, books, and anything else he might
need from the human world. Whenever the boy strays from his usual play
among the headstones, he finds new dangers, learns his limitations and
strengths, and acquires the skills he needs to survive within the
confines of the graveyard and in wider world beyond. (ages 10 and up) -–Heidi Broadhead
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


tanyainmizzou
by on Aug. 21, 2013 at 4:15 PM

it is supposed to be for 10 and up, but I think it would probably be a better story for a child reading at the 9th grade level or more. 

Quoting Jack_Squat:

Ooooh. She would love that. She loves ghostly things. Do you happen to know the reading level?


Quoting tanyainmizzou:

I read "Emma" when I was ten, but that isn't current.


However, I read a book by Neil Gaiman a couple of years ago called "The Graveyard Book."

It was really good and is classified as children's fantasy.


This is the amazon.com review


In The Graveyard Book, Neil Gaiman has created a charming
allegory of childhood. Although the book opens with a scary scene--a
family is stabbed to death by "a man named Jack” --the story quickly
moves into more child-friendly storytelling. The sole survivor of the
attack--an 18-month-old baby--escapes his crib and his house, and
toddles to a nearby graveyard. Quickly recognizing that the baby is
orphaned, the graveyard's ghostly residents adopt him, name him Nobody
("Bod"), and allow him to live in their tomb. Taking inspiration from
Kipling’s The Jungle Book, Gaiman describes how the toddler
navigates among the headstones, asking a lot of questions and picking up
the tricks of the living and the dead. In serial-like episodes, the
story follows Bod's progress as he grows from baby to teen, learning
life’s lessons amid a cadre of the long-dead, ghouls, witches,
intermittent human interlopers. A pallid, nocturnal guardian named
Silas ensures that Bod receives food, books, and anything else he might
need from the human world. Whenever the boy strays from his usual play
among the headstones, he finds new dangers, learns his limitations and
strengths, and acquires the skills he needs to survive within the
confines of the graveyard and in wider world beyond. (ages 10 and up) -–Heidi Broadhead
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.



survivorinohio
by René on Aug. 21, 2013 at 4:27 PM
4 moms liked this

At that age I remember reading Farenheit 451, The Hobbit,  and the Fantastic Journey and loved them all.

momtoscott
by Platinum Member on Aug. 21, 2013 at 4:43 PM
4 moms liked this

I agree with the recommendation for Gaiman's The Graveyard Book.  The writing is scary-good.  Another book of his for younger readers is Coraline.  Lord of the Rings, if she likes fantasy.  Rick Riordan has several fantasy series aimed at teens that aren't overly mature.  I'm not familiar much with teen writing aimed at girls. 

I would think that a 10-year-old who likes reading should just be let loose in the library to pick her own books, because tastes will vary.   At that age I was reading Verne and Dickens and Heinlein and Asimov and had just waded into The Tempest, which was page one of our Shakespeare collection.  And the Encyclopedia Britannica, and books about bugs and critters, etc.  

bluerooffarm
by Bronze Member on Aug. 21, 2013 at 5:11 PM

 The Hobbit, The Phantom Tollbooth, Tuck Everlasting, The Maximum Ride books by Patterson, A Break With Charity, The Coffin Quilt

FrogSalad
by Sooze on Aug. 21, 2013 at 5:40 PM

I'm reading American Gods now after finishing Anansi Boys (both by Gaiman) last week.  Both of them have mature content (I think). 

Someone else mentioned Tolkien; I know some people love him and read him in their teens but I find his style to be a snooze-fest.  Page after page of people wandering around and nothing really happens. 

I loved Orson Scott Card's book Ender's Game.  It's science fiction and is about kids but it wasn't written specifically for YAs.

Quoting tanyainmizzou:

I read "Emma" when I was ten, but that isn't current.


However, I read a book by Neil Gaiman a couple of years ago called "The Graveyard Book."

It was really good and is classified as children's fantasy.

(snipped)



Atheist Mama?  Join us!

How paramount the future is to the present when one is surrounded by children.  Charles Darwin

FrogSalad
by Sooze on Aug. 21, 2013 at 5:42 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting momtoscott:

I agree with the recommendation for Gaiman's The Graveyard Book.  The writing is scary-good.  Another book of his for younger readers is Coraline.  Lord of the Rings, if she likes fantasy.  Rick Riordan has several fantasy series aimed at teens that aren't overly mature.  I'm not familiar much with teen writing aimed at girls. 

I would think that a 10-year-old who likes reading should just be let loose in the library to pick her own books, because tastes will vary.   At that age I was reading Verne and Dickens and Heinlein and Asimov and had just waded into The Tempest, which was page one of our Shakespeare collection.  And the Encyclopedia Britannica, and books about bugs and critters, etc.  

Absolutely agree.  I can't recall my parents ever denying me anything I wanted to read and my dad was a voracious science fiction junkie so I inherited all of his paperbacks once he was done reading them.  Some of them had racy content.  However, I think I was in middle school, not 10 at that time.


Atheist Mama?  Join us!

How paramount the future is to the present when one is surrounded by children.  Charles Darwin

The_Doodle
by Member on Aug. 21, 2013 at 5:43 PM

The Giver by Lois Lowry

The Thief of Always by Clive Barker

The Eyes of the Dragon by Stephen King


Don't let the names Clive Barker and Stephen King make you wary of these books, they are incredible books and, although they do have a bad guy, they are kid-friendly.

Sekirei
by Nari Trickster on Aug. 21, 2013 at 5:44 PM

I guess it depends.. at that age, I was reading Dracula, little women and Jane Eyre. 

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