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We argue over race while our children are being taught this?

Posted by on Aug. 24, 2013 at 12:04 AM
  • 288 Replies

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/08/22/pedophilia-incest-and-graphic-sex-excerpts-from-a-common-core-reading-list-book-for-11th-graders-that-will-make-you-blush/


I do not know if any of you are aware of what Common Core is. Its a very subversive 'educational' standard that is being foisted in most states, mainly because it comes with a grant to help the schools that implement it. This is very disturbing that this kind of material is being offered as part of the suggested reading list. Common Core destroys a teachers ability to teach and instead makes everyone the same without any room for adjustment. You thought no child left behind was bad this is worse.

by on Aug. 24, 2013 at 12:04 AM
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AlekD
by Gold Member on Aug. 24, 2013 at 12:12 AM
7 moms liked this

My child isn't being taught that.


Yay homeschool!

gsprofval
by Silver Member on Aug. 24, 2013 at 12:14 AM
3 moms liked this

Common core has nothing good in it.  There are plenty of good literature books, but instead, bHo's group who wrote it choose crap like this to teach--and dropped the good literature to replace it with this crap and reading government documents--documents even Congress won't read, i.e. bHo care.

The way is to be taught is even worse. Kids don't even have to get the right answer, but basically pass just for "trying". Ya, that will get them far in life and in many professions, get people killed.

sweet-a-kins
by Emerald Member on Aug. 24, 2013 at 12:22 AM
2 moms liked this
Obama's group wrote it?

In 2009 the National Governors Association hired David Coleman and Student Achievement to write curriculum standards in the areas of literacy and mathematics instruction. Announced on June 1, 2009,[6] the initiative's stated purpose is to "provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them."[7] Additionally, "The standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers," which will place American students in a position in which they can compete in a global economy.[7]

The standards are copyrighted by NGA Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) [8] The copyright ensures that the standards will be the same throughout the nation, creating a de-facto national curriculum. The standards also carry a generous public license [9] which waives the copyright notice for State Departments of Education to use the standards; however, two conditions apply. First, the use of the standards must be "in support" of the standards and the waiver only applies if the state has adopted the standards "in whole." This use of a copyright for public policy document is unprecedented in U.S. political history. The effect of the copyright and public license is consistency across the states; the standards cannot be changed or modified, creating in effect, a national curriculum.

Forty-five of the fifty states in the United States are members of the Common Core State Standards Initiative, with the states of Texas, Virginia, Alaska, and Nebraska not adopting the initiative at a state level.[10]Minnesota has adopted the English Language Arts standards but not the Mathematics standards.[11]

Standards were released for mathematics and English language arts on June 2, 2010, with a majority of states adopting the standards in the subsequent months. (See below for current status.) States were given an incentive to adopt the Common Core Standards through the possibility of competitive federal Race to the Top grants. President Obama and Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced the Race to the Top competitive grants on July 24, 2009, as a motivator for education reform.[12] To be eligible, states had to adopt "internationally benchmarked standards and assessments that prepare students for success in college and the work place."[13] This meant that in order for a state to be eligible for these grants, the states had to adopt the Common Core State Standards or a similar career and college readiness curriculum. The competition for these grants provided a major push for states to adopt the standards.[14] The adoption dates for those states that chose to adopt the Common Core State Standards Initiative are all within the two years following this announcement.[15] The common standards are funded by the governors and state schools chiefs, with additional support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, and others.[16] States are planning to implement this initiative by 2015[17] by basing at least 85% of their state curricula on the Standards.

In 2010, Standards were released for English language arts and mathematics. Standards have not yet been developed for science or social studies.


Quoting gsprofval:

Common core has nothing good in it.  There are plenty of good literature books, but instead, bHo's group who wrote it choose crap like this to teach--and dropped the good literature to replace it with this crap and reading government documents--documents even Congress won't read, i.e. bHo care.


The way is to be taught is even worse. Kids don't even have to get the right answer, but basically pass just for "trying". Ya, that will get them far in life and in many professions, get people killed.

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greenie63
by Silver Member on Aug. 24, 2013 at 12:22 AM
3 moms liked this

Myths About Content and Quality: General 

(taken from www.corestandards.org
 

Myth: Adopting common standards will bring all states’ standards down to the lowest common denominator, which means states with high standards, such as Massachusetts, will be taking a step backwards if they adopt the Standards.

Fact: The Standards are designed to build upon the most advanced current thinking about preparing all students for success in college and their careers. This will result in moving even the best state standards to the next level. In fact, since this work began, there has been an explicit agreement that no state would lower its standards. The Standards were informed by the best in the country, the highest international standards, and evidence and expertise about educational outcomes. We need college and career ready standards because even in high‐performing states – students are graduating and passing all the required tests and still require remediation in their postsecondary work.

Myth: The Standards are not internationally benchmarked.

Fact: International benchmarking played a significant role in both sets of standards. In fact, the college and career ready standards include an appendix listing the evidence that was consulted in drafting the standards and the international data consulted in the benchmarking process is included in this appendix. More evidence from international sources will be presented together with the final draft.

Myth: The Standards only include skills and do not address the importance of content knowledge.

Fact: The Standards recognize that both content and skills are important.

In English‐language arts, the Standards require certain critical content for all students, including: classic myths and stories from around the world, America’s Founding Documents, foundational American literature, and Shakespeare. Appropriately, the remaining crucial decisions about what content should be taught are left to state and local determination. In addition to content coverage, the Standards require that students systematically acquire knowledge in literature and other disciplines through reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

In Mathematics, the Standards lay a solid foundation in whole numbers, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, and decimals. Taken together, these elements support a student’s ability to learn and apply more demanding math concepts and procedures. The middle school and high school standards call on students to practice applying mathematical ways of thinking to real world issues and challenges; they prepare students to think and reason mathematically. The Standards set a rigorous definition of college and career readiness, not by piling topic upon topic, but by demanding that students develop a depth of understanding and ability to apply mathematics to novel situations, as college students and employees regularly do.

Myth: The Standards suggest teaching “Grapes of Wrath” to second graders.

Fact: The ELA Standards suggest “Grapes of Wrath” as a text that would be appropriate for 9th or 10thgrade readers. Evidence shows that the complexity of texts students are reading today does not match what is demanded in college and the workplace, creating a gap between what high school students can do and what they need to be able to do. The Common Core State Standards create a staircase of increasing text complexity, so that students are expected to both develop their skills and apply them to more and more complex texts.

Myth: The Standards are just vague descriptions of skills; they don’t include a reading list or any other similar reference to content.

Fact: The Standards do include sample texts that demonstrate the level of text complexity appropriate for the grade level and compatible with the learning demands set out in the Standards. The exemplars of high quality texts at each grade level provide a rich set of possibilities and have been very well received. This provides teachers with the flexibility to make their own decisions about what texts to use – while providing an excellent reference point when selecting their texts.

Myth: English teachers will be asked to teach science and social studies reading materials.

Fact: With the Common Core ELA Standards, English teachers will still teach their students literature as well as literary non‐fiction. However, because college and career readiness overwhelmingly focuses on complex texts outside of literature, these standards also ensure students are being prepared to read, write, and research across the curriculum, including in history and science. These goals can be achieved by ensuring that teachers in other disciplines are also focusing on reading and writing to build knowledge within their subject areas.

Myth: The Standards don’t have enough emphasis on fiction/literature.

Fact: The Standards require certain critical content for all students, including: classic myths and stories from around the world, America’s Founding Documents, foundational American literature, and Shakespeare. Appropriately, the remaining crucial decisions about what content should be taught are left to state and local determination. In addition to content coverage, the Standards require that students systematically acquire knowledge in literature and other disciplines through reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

 

 
 
Myths About Content and Quality: Math

Myth: The Standards do not prepare or require students to learn Algebra in the 8th grade, as many states’ current standards do.

Fact: The Standards do accommodate and prepare students for Algebra 1 in 8th grade, by including the prerequisites for this course in grades K‐7. Students who master the K‐7 material will be able to take Algebra 1 in 8th grade. At the same time, grade 8 standards are also included; these include rigorous algebra and will transition students effectively into a full Algebra 1 course.

Myth: Key math topics are missing or appear in the wrong grade.

Fact: The mathematical progressions presented in the common core are coherent and based on evidence.

Part of the problem with having 50 different sets of state standards is that today, different states cover different topics at different grade levels. Coming to consensus guarantees that from the viewpoint of any given state, topics will move up or down in the grade level sequence. This is unavoidable. What is important to keep in mind is that the progression in the Common Core State Standards is mathematically coherent and leads to college and career readiness at an internationally competitive level.

 

 
Myths About Content and Quality: English-language arts

Myth: The standards suggest teaching Grapes of Wrath to 2nd graders.

Fact: The ELA Standards suggest Grapes of Wrath as a text that would be appropriate for 9th or 10th grade readers. Evidence shows that the complexity of texts students are reading today does not match what is demanded in college and the workplace, creating a gap between what high school students can do and what they need to be able to do. The Common Core State Standards create a staircase of increasing text complexity, so that students are expected to both develop their skills and apply them to more and more complex texts.

Myth: The standards are just vague descriptions of skills; they don't include a reading list or any other similar reference to content.

Fact: The standards do include sample texts that demonstrate the level of text complexity appropriate for the grade level and compatible with the learning demands set out in the standards. The exemplars of high quality texts at each grade level provide a rich set of possibilities and have been very well received. This provides teachers with the flexibility to make their own decisions about what texts to use - while providing an excellent reference point when selecting their texts.

Myth: English teachers will be asked to teach science and social studies reading materials.

Fact: With the Common Core ELA Standards, English teachers will still teach their students literature as well as literary non-fiction. However, because college and career readiness overwhelmingly focuses on complex texts outside of literature, these standards also ensure students are being prepared to read, write, and research across the curriculum, including in history and science. These goals can be achieved by ensuring that teachers in other disciplines are also focusing on reading and writing to build knowledge within their subject areas.

Myth: The standards don't have enough emphasis on fiction/literature.

Fact: The standards require certain critical content for all students, including: classic myths and stories from around the world, America's Founding Documents, foundational American literature, and Shakespeare. Appropriately, the remaining crucial decisions about what content should be taught are left to state and local determination. In addition to content coverage, the standards require that students systematically acquire knowledge in literature and other disciplines through reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

 

 
Myths About Process

Myth: No teachers were involved in writing the Standards.

Fact: The common core state standards drafting process relied on teachers and standards experts from across the country. In addition, there were many state experts that came together to create the most thoughtful and transparent process of standard setting. This was only made possible by many states working together.

Myth: The Standards are not research or evidence based.

Fact: The Standards have made careful use of a large and growing body of evidence. The evidence base includes scholarly research; surveys on what skills are required of students entering college and workforce training programs; assessment data identifying college‐and career‐ready performance; and comparisons to standards from high‐performing states and nations.

In English language arts, the Standards build on the firm foundation of the NAEP frameworks in Reading and Writing, which draw on extensive scholarly research and evidence.

In Mathematics, the Standards draw on conclusions from TIMSS and other studies of high‐performing countries that the traditional US mathematics curriculum must become substantially more coherent and focused in order to improve student achievement, addressing the problem of a curriculum that is “a mile wide and an inch deep.”

 

 
Myths About Implementation

Myth: The Standards tell teachers what to teach.

Fact: The best understanding of what works in the classroom comes from the teachers who are in them. That’s why these standards will establish what students need to learn, but they will not dictatehow teachers should teach. Instead, schools and teachers will decide how best to help students reach the standards.

Myth: The Standards will be implemented through No Child Left Behind (NCLB) - signifying that the federal government will be leading them.

Fact: The Common Core State Standards Initiative is a state‐led effort that is not part of No Child Left Behind and adoption of the Standards is in no way mandatory. States began the work to create clear, consistent standards before the Recovery Act or the Elementary and Secondary Education Act blueprint was released because this work is being driven by the needs of the states, not the federal government.

The NGA Center and CCSSO are offering support by developing a State Policymaker Guide to Implementation, facilitating opportunities for collaboration among organizations working on implementation, planning the future governance structure of the standards, and convening the publishing community to ensure that high quality materials aligned with the standards are created.

Myth: These Standards amount to a national curriculum for our schools.

Fact: The Standards are not a curriculum. They are a clear set of shared goals and expectations for what knowledge and skills will help our students succeed. Local teachers, principals, superintendents and others will decide how the standards are to be met. Teachers will continue to devise lesson plans and tailor instruction to the individual needs of the students in their classrooms.

lizzielouaf
by Gold Member on Aug. 24, 2013 at 12:22 AM
2 moms liked this


Are you fully aware of the common core initiative and when it all developed? 

Quoting gsprofval:

Common core has nothing good in it.  There are plenty of good literature books, but instead, bHo's group who wrote it choose crap like this to teach--and dropped the good literature to replace it with this crap and reading government documents--documents even Congress won't read, i.e. bHo care.

The way is to be taught is even worse. Kids don't even have to get the right answer, but basically pass just for "trying". Ya, that will get them far in life and in many professions, get people killed.



TranquilMind
by Platinum Member on Aug. 24, 2013 at 12:53 AM
6 moms liked this

 Right.  The most dangerous part is that it tracks the kid from preschool throughout high school, and maintains huge databases on everyone.  That alone is enough to opt out. 

It also uses snippets of books, not whole books!  Nope. That's not how we do it here.   We go deep. 

impostagothkat
by on Aug. 24, 2013 at 1:15 AM

http://schoolsucksproject.com/225-live-show-the-road-to-hell-is-paved-with-central-plans/


This is by far one of the most educated websites out there. For anyone who is actually interested in learning something about the world go to schoolsucks. Amazing place for informaiton.

Goodwoman614
by Satan on Aug. 24, 2013 at 1:28 AM
6 moms liked this

Paranoia

impostagothkat
by on Aug. 24, 2013 at 1:35 AM
1 mom liked this

Very insightful

Quoting Goodwoman614:

Paranoia


DestinyHLewis
by Destiny on Aug. 24, 2013 at 1:40 AM
2 moms liked this

We just switched last year to common core. I hate it for a ton of reasons, but this just blew my mind. 

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