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Did you hear about the Bees?

Posted by on Aug. 30, 2013 at 3:02 AM
  • 17 Replies
by on Aug. 30, 2013 at 3:02 AM
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Replies (1-10):
stormcris
by Christy on Aug. 30, 2013 at 3:04 AM

Yep!

SadiasMomma
by Member on Aug. 30, 2013 at 3:10 AM
Scary! My husband's job always has a lot of bees. They fly into the store then They end up dying because they can't figure out how to fly out. They'll ram the glass window over and over again. Its rather sad. If he happens to catch one in a cup he sets it free, but they're usually scared and defensive. He never kills them but he probably should since its a death sentence anyway. At least then they wouldn't spend 3 hours fighting for their life. Poor bees.
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copasetic1
by Bronze Member on Aug. 30, 2013 at 3:14 AM

 We are doomed. If we don't starve to death because of the bees, over-population will get us.

Woodbabe
by Woodie on Aug. 30, 2013 at 7:57 AM

Here is a different but interesting take on the bee problem from Brother Blaise I knew in SoCal. Of course its not 'scientific' but there are a lot of people in the area that are sitting up and paying attention to him.

http://www.holytrinityob.com/uploads/1/4/0/2/14027756/logos_spring_2013.pdf

About 40 years ago, I took up beekeeping as a hobby. It has been a source of fun and has provided spiritual nourishment as I learn more and more about these wonderful creatures, and how God has them all working together like a giant social network. I love to see how they gather nectar from many different flowers and at the same time pollinate the flowers and fruit trees. In addition, they provide wonderful products such as honey, wax, propolis, royal jelly and bee pollen. 

The beekeeping kept building up so that during most of the thirty years of beekeeping, I was extracting one hundred gallons of honey a week. During one particularly fruitful springtime, I was able to extract over fourhundred gallons from just 20 hives! At one time I had over one hundred healthy hives. 

But ten years ago a few cell phone communication towers were constructed at the northern edge of our property. As the cell phone business expanded, they added more units and built more towers. Since the towers went up, my honey flow slowed down and eventually stopped. All my bee colonies began dying within two weeks or two hours after I installed them. I gave no notice to the towers since there could be other things to cause bees to die, such as bug spray in the air, mite infestation, weather conditions, etc. The problem of bees dying is so large that the Department of Agriculture in the United States, and similar departments in Europe and Brazil are concerned and looking in to the matter. 

After ten years of trying different medications and redesigning my boxes, I finally decided to move my bees to a different location. At the beginning of our abbey driveway is a small canyon with steep hills surrounding it. I used a regular cell phone to find a spot with no detectable communication signal, and I relocated my bees to that location. Bees I gathered from new swarms stopped dying off right away, and now the bees are doing much better. I have about twenty-five healthy hives. For the first time in over ten years, I extracted my first gallon of honey! What a joy it is to see the light golden honey again from our own hives! 

http://fox5sandiego.com/2013/04/22/bees-swarm-san-diego/#axzz2dS7La384

http://weepnews.blogspot.com/2011/05/bees-know-best-at-oceansides-prince-of.html


 Sexy If its unladylike, fattening or fun, I'm in!
  

SuzCahn
by Bronze Member on Aug. 30, 2013 at 9:29 AM

 Interesting and great read. Thanks for posting!

Quoting Woodbabe:

Here is a different but interesting take on the bee problem from Brother Blaise I knew in SoCal. Of course its not 'scientific' but there are a lot of people in the area that are sitting up and paying attention to him.

http://www.holytrinityob.com/uploads/1/4/0/2/14027756/logos_spring_2013.pdf

About 40 years ago, I took up beekeeping as a hobby. It has been a source of fun and has provided spiritual nourishment as I learn more and more about these wonderful creatures, and how God has them all working together like a giant social network. I love to see how they gather nectar from many different flowers and at the same time pollinate the flowers and fruit trees. In addition, they provide wonderful products such as honey, wax, propolis, royal jelly and bee pollen. 

The beekeeping kept building up so that during most of the thirty years of beekeeping, I was extracting one hundred gallons of honey a week. During one particularly fruitful springtime, I was able to extract over fourhundred gallons from just 20 hives! At one time I had over one hundred healthy hives. 

But ten years ago a few cell phone communication towers were constructed at the northern edge of our property. As the cell phone business expanded, they added more units and built more towers. Since the towers went up, my honey flow slowed down and eventually stopped. All my bee colonies began dying within two weeks or two hours after I installed them. I gave no notice to the towers since there could be other things to cause bees to die, such as bug spray in the air, mite infestation, weather conditions, etc. The problem of bees dying is so large that the Department of Agriculture in the United States, and similar departments in Europe and Brazil are concerned and looking in to the matter. 

After ten years of trying different medications and redesigning my boxes, I finally decided to move my bees to a different location. At the beginning of our abbey driveway is a small canyon with steep hills surrounding it. I used a regular cell phone to find a spot with no detectable communication signal, and I relocated my bees to that location. Bees I gathered from new swarms stopped dying off right away, and now the bees are doing much better. I have about twenty-five healthy hives. For the first time in over ten years, I extracted my first gallon of honey! What a joy it is to see the light golden honey again from our own hives! 

http://fox5sandiego.com/2013/04/22/bees-swarm-san-diego/#axzz2dS7La384

http://weepnews.blogspot.com/2011/05/bees-know-best-at-oceansides-prince-of.html

 

 

copasetic1
by Bronze Member on Aug. 30, 2013 at 9:26 PM

 There has been a lot of talk about the towers. Studies have been done and are said to show no connection. But Cell phone companies are rich and powerful, so, to me, the studies aren't particularly credible. It's like when people say there are problems caused by electricity. The government isn't about to do anything about powerful companies and what most people consider necessities. I worry about the chemicals, and the cell towers, and also - a lot of the stuff for producing honey, even bees, come from China.

Quoting Woodbabe:

Here is a different but interesting take on the bee problem from Brother Blaise I knew in SoCal. Of course its not 'scientific' but there are a lot of people in the area that are sitting up and paying attention to him.

http://www.holytrinityob.com/uploads/1/4/0/2/14027756/logos_spring_2013.pdf

About 40 years ago, I took up beekeeping as a hobby. It has been a source of fun and has provided spiritual nourishment as I learn more and more about these wonderful creatures, and how God has them all working together like a giant social network. I love to see how they gather nectar from many different flowers and at the same time pollinate the flowers and fruit trees. In addition, they provide wonderful products such as honey, wax, propolis, royal jelly and bee pollen. 

The beekeeping kept building up so that during most of the thirty years of beekeeping, I was extracting one hundred gallons of honey a week. During one particularly fruitful springtime, I was able to extract over fourhundred gallons from just 20 hives! At one time I had over one hundred healthy hives. 

But ten years ago a few cell phone communication towers were constructed at the northern edge of our property. As the cell phone business expanded, they added more units and built more towers. Since the towers went up, my honey flow slowed down and eventually stopped. All my bee colonies began dying within two weeks or two hours after I installed them. I gave no notice to the towers since there could be other things to cause bees to die, such as bug spray in the air, mite infestation, weather conditions, etc. The problem of bees dying is so large that the Department of Agriculture in the United States, and similar departments in Europe and Brazil are concerned and looking in to the matter. 

After ten years of trying different medications and redesigning my boxes, I finally decided to move my bees to a different location. At the beginning of our abbey driveway is a small canyon with steep hills surrounding it. I used a regular cell phone to find a spot with no detectable communication signal, and I relocated my bees to that location. Bees I gathered from new swarms stopped dying off right away, and now the bees are doing much better. I have about twenty-five healthy hives. For the first time in over ten years, I extracted my first gallon of honey! What a joy it is to see the light golden honey again from our own hives! 

http://fox5sandiego.com/2013/04/22/bees-swarm-san-diego/#axzz2dS7La384

http://weepnews.blogspot.com/2011/05/bees-know-best-at-oceansides-prince-of.html

 

 

copasetic1
by Bronze Member on Aug. 30, 2013 at 9:29 PM

 Thank you, by the way, for the info. A lot more people should be aware of this issue - and really scared. But people refuse to look at the future, as we see in this trend of having large families again. Worst possible thing to do, no offense to anyone with a large family. Just my opinion, of course.

Quoting copasetic1:

 There has been a lot of talk about the towers. Studies have been done and are said to show no connection. But Cell phone companies are rich and powerful, so, to me, the studies aren't particularly credible. It's like when people say there are problems caused by electricity. The government isn't about to do anything about powerful companies and what most people consider necessities. I worry about the chemicals, and the cell towers, and also - a lot of the stuff for producing honey, even bees, come from China.

Quoting Woodbabe:

Here is a different but interesting take on the bee problem from Brother Blaise I knew in SoCal. Of course its not 'scientific' but there are a lot of people in the area that are sitting up and paying attention to him.

http://www.holytrinityob.com/uploads/1/4/0/2/14027756/logos_spring_2013.pdf

About 40 years ago, I took up beekeeping as a hobby. It has been a source of fun and has provided spiritual nourishment as I learn more and more about these wonderful creatures, and how God has them all working together like a giant social network. I love to see how they gather nectar from many different flowers and at the same time pollinate the flowers and fruit trees. In addition, they provide wonderful products such as honey, wax, propolis, royal jelly and bee pollen. 

The beekeeping kept building up so that during most of the thirty years of beekeeping, I was extracting one hundred gallons of honey a week. During one particularly fruitful springtime, I was able to extract over fourhundred gallons from just 20 hives! At one time I had over one hundred healthy hives. 

But ten years ago a few cell phone communication towers were constructed at the northern edge of our property. As the cell phone business expanded, they added more units and built more towers. Since the towers went up, my honey flow slowed down and eventually stopped. All my bee colonies began dying within two weeks or two hours after I installed them. I gave no notice to the towers since there could be other things to cause bees to die, such as bug spray in the air, mite infestation, weather conditions, etc. The problem of bees dying is so large that the Department of Agriculture in the United States, and similar departments in Europe and Brazil are concerned and looking in to the matter. 

After ten years of trying different medications and redesigning my boxes, I finally decided to move my bees to a different location. At the beginning of our abbey driveway is a small canyon with steep hills surrounding it. I used a regular cell phone to find a spot with no detectable communication signal, and I relocated my bees to that location. Bees I gathered from new swarms stopped dying off right away, and now the bees are doing much better. I have about twenty-five healthy hives. For the first time in over ten years, I extracted my first gallon of honey! What a joy it is to see the light golden honey again from our own hives! 

http://fox5sandiego.com/2013/04/22/bees-swarm-san-diego/#axzz2dS7La384

http://weepnews.blogspot.com/2011/05/bees-know-best-at-oceansides-prince-of.html

 

 

 

PinkButterfly66
by Gold Member on Aug. 30, 2013 at 9:33 PM

Yes... it has been linked to nicotinic based pesticides and they need to be banned, but they won't be.

http://www.treehugger.com/clean-technology/nicotine-bees-population-restored-with-neonicotinoids-ban.html

"Nicotine Bees" Population Restored With Neonicotinoids Ban


Bee barely hangs on before collapsing. Photo by Operaticomnivore

Following France and Germany, last year the Italian Agriculture Ministry suspended the use of a class of pesticides, nicotine-based neonicotinoids, as a "precautionary measure." The compelling results - restored bee populations - prompted the government to uphold the ban. Yesterday, copies of the film 'Nicotine Bees' were delivered to the US Congress explaining the pesticide's connection to Colony Collapse Disorder. Despite the evidence, why does CCD remain a 'mystery' in the US? 
Trailer for "Nicotine Bees" documentary explaining cause for Colony Collapse Disorder.

Nicotinyl pesticides, containing clothianidin, thiametoxam and imidacloprid, used to coat plant seeds, are released into the lymph as a permanent insecticide inside the plant. But after just sucking dew from maize leaves that absorbed neonicotinoids, disoriented bees can't find their way to the apiary. Massive numbers of bees get lost and die.

In 2009, Italy's neonicotinoid-free corn sowing resulted in no cases of widespread bee mortality in apiaries around the crops. This had not happened since 1999. The European Research Center, Youris, reported that Moreno Greatti, from the University of Udine stated, "Bee hives have not suffered depopulation and mortality coinciding with maize sowing this year. Beekeepers from Northern Italy and all over the country are unanimous in recognizing that the suspension of neonicotinoid- and fipronil-coated maize seeds."

Although varroasis (infections from mites) and other pathologies are found at other times of the year, suspending neurotoxic insecticides improved the situation significantly. Francesco Panella, President of the Italian Association of Beekepers, says: "On behalf of beegrowers working in a countryside dominated by maize crops, I wrote to the Minister of Agriculture to confirm the great news, for once: thanks to the suspension of the bee-killing seed coating, the hives in the Po Valley are flourishing again."

Not true in Southern Italy, where bee mortality was high in citrus groves, which were sprayed with neonicotinoids, also used in vineyards and other crops. The new law has been challenged by the agrochemical industry but the Italian government upheld the ban.

Want to eat?

With pollination responsible for one-third of our food supply, the loss of 30% of our bee population prompted the Pollinator Protection Campaign by theSierra Club. It bought 333 copies of Nicotine Bees which were delivered to Congress on May 13 and 14, along with 50 more from the filmmakers, with a letter from the National Honey Bee Advisory Board. The American Beekeeping Federation and American Honey Producers Association are asking Congress to stop the threats from systemic pesticides to food supplies, honeybees and pollinators. Send a copy to the other 152 members of Congress by contacting the Sierra Club's bee campaign.

The bees steep decline in 2005 and 2006 was catastrophic around the world. In the UK bee numbers have been halved over 20 years, with reasons including the pesticide and warmer winters due to climate change. Honeybee pollinated fruit trees and crops in Britain amount to £165m annually, so a campaign to grow bees in city gardens and roofs has been an attempt to halt decline.

Despite the scientific data, reports still claim the reason for the bee crisis is unclear, even blaming cell phones. So what's really holding up the banning of neonicotinoids? As a beekeeper in the documentary says, "A fifth grader can figure this out."

More on Colony Collapse Disorder:
Green Eyes On: Is Bees' Thirst Leading to Their Demise?
Bees Equiped With Microchips Help Explain Hive Declines
Bees Rejoice: One Potential Cause of Colony Collapse Disorder

Ms.KitKat
by Platinum Member on Aug. 30, 2013 at 9:38 PM

 Interesting. I bet it's a combo of both.

Quoting Woodbabe:

Here is a different but interesting take on the bee problem from Brother Blaise I knew in SoCal. Of course its not 'scientific' but there are a lot of people in the area that are sitting up and paying attention to him.

http://www.holytrinityob.com/uploads/1/4/0/2/14027756/logos_spring_2013.pdf

About 40 years ago, I took up beekeeping as a hobby. It has been a source of fun and has provided spiritual nourishment as I learn more and more about these wonderful creatures, and how God has them all working together like a giant social network. I love to see how they gather nectar from many different flowers and at the same time pollinate the flowers and fruit trees. In addition, they provide wonderful products such as honey, wax, propolis, royal jelly and bee pollen. 

The beekeeping kept building up so that during most of the thirty years of beekeeping, I was extracting one hundred gallons of honey a week. During one particularly fruitful springtime, I was able to extract over fourhundred gallons from just 20 hives! At one time I had over one hundred healthy hives. 

But ten years ago a few cell phone communication towers were constructed at the northern edge of our property. As the cell phone business expanded, they added more units and built more towers. Since the towers went up, my honey flow slowed down and eventually stopped. All my bee colonies began dying within two weeks or two hours after I installed them. I gave no notice to the towers since there could be other things to cause bees to die, such as bug spray in the air, mite infestation, weather conditions, etc. The problem of bees dying is so large that the Department of Agriculture in the United States, and similar departments in Europe and Brazil are concerned and looking in to the matter. 

After ten years of trying different medications and redesigning my boxes, I finally decided to move my bees to a different location. At the beginning of our abbey driveway is a small canyon with steep hills surrounding it. I used a regular cell phone to find a spot with no detectable communication signal, and I relocated my bees to that location. Bees I gathered from new swarms stopped dying off right away, and now the bees are doing much better. I have about twenty-five healthy hives. For the first time in over ten years, I extracted my first gallon of honey! What a joy it is to see the light golden honey again from our own hives! 

http://fox5sandiego.com/2013/04/22/bees-swarm-san-diego/#axzz2dS7La384

http://weepnews.blogspot.com/2011/05/bees-know-best-at-oceansides-prince-of.html

 

 

Ms.KitKat
by Platinum Member on Aug. 30, 2013 at 9:39 PM

 And I am worried about the dolphins on the east coast as well as the bats.

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