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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Obamacare will question your sex life

Posted by on Sep. 16, 2013 at 7:33 AM
  • 236 Replies
1 mom liked this


Are you sexually active? If so, with one partner, multiple partners or same-sex partners?”

Be ready to answer those questions and more the next time you go to the doctor, whether it’s the dermatologist or the cardiologist and no matter if the questions are unrelated to why you’re seeking medical help. And you can thank the Obama health law.

“This is nasty business,” says New York cardiologist Dr. Adam Budzikowski. He called the sex questions “insensitive, stupid and very intrusive.” He couldn’t think of an occasion when a cardiologist would need such information — but he knows he’ll be pushed to ask for it.

The president’s “reforms” aim to turn doctors into government agents, pressuring them financially to ask questions they consider inappropriate and unnecessary, and to violate their Hippocratic Oath to keep patients’ records confidential.

Embarrassing though it may be, you confide things to a doctor you wouldn’t tell anyone else. But this is entirely different.

Doctors and hospitals who don’t comply with the federal government’s electronic-health-records requirements forgo incentive payments now; starting in 2015, they’ll face financial penalties from Medicare and Medicaid. The Department of Health and Human Services has already paid out over $12.7 billion for these incentives.

Dr. Richard Amerling, a nephrologist and associate professor at Albert Einstein Medical College, explains that your medical record should be “a story created by you and your doctor solely for your treatment and benefit.” But the new requirements are turning it “into an interrogation, and the data will not be confidential.”

Lack of confidentiality is what concerned the New York Civil Liberties Union in a 2012 report. Electronic medical records have enormous benefits, but with one click of a mouse, every piece of information in a patient’s record, including the social history, is transmitted, disclosing too much.

The social-history questions also include whether you’ve ever used drugs, including IV drugs. As the NYCLU cautioned, revealing a patient’s past drug problem, even if it was a decade ago, risks stigma.

On the other end of the political spectrum is the Goldwater Institute, a free-market think tank. It argues that by requiring everyone to have health insurance and then imposing penalties on insurers, doctors and hospitals who don’t use the one-click electronic system, the law is violating Americans’ medical privacy.

The administration is ignoring these protests from privacy advocates. On Jan. 17, HHS announced patients who want to keep something out of their electronic record should pay cash. That’s impractical for most people.

There’s one question they can’t ask: Thanks to the NRA, Section 2716 of the ObamaCare law bars the federal government from compelling doctors and hospitals to ask you if you own a firearm.

But that’s the only question they can’t be told to ask you.

Where are the women’s rights groups that went to the barricades in the 1980s and 1990s to prevent the federal government from accessing a woman’s health records? Hypocritically, they are silent now.

Patients need to defend their own privacy by refusing to answer the intrusive social-history questions. If you need to confide something pertaining to your treatment, ask your doctor about keeping two sets of books so that your secret stays in the office. Doctors take the Hippocratic Oath seriously and won’t be offended.

Are such precautions paranoid? Hardly. WikiLeaker Bradley Manning showed how incompetent the government is at keeping its own secrets; incidents where various agencies accidentally disclose personal data like Social Security numbers are legion. And that’s not to mention the ways in which commercial databases are prone to hacking and/or exploitation.

Be careful about sharing your medical secrets with Uncle Sam.

Minnow Slayer

by on Sep. 16, 2013 at 7:33 AM
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Replies (1-10):
kidlover2
by Bronze Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 7:36 AM
23 moms liked this
Am I missing something because my doctors have been asking me all those questions for years and HIPAA has been around for a long time and I don't see that going anywhere anytime soon.
lhiannan
by Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 7:37 AM
1 mom liked this
Pretty sure i've been answering those questions for years....nothing new here.
lga1965
by on Sep. 16, 2013 at 7:41 AM
3 moms liked this

 Yeah, this is not a new thing and Obama doesn't care, the Doctors do....what the hell? Obamacare is a stupid name for the ACA. Can you BE any more bigoted, Carpy? What is your source, Breitbart? Ugh.

LauraKW
by "Dude!" on Sep. 16, 2013 at 7:42 AM
19 moms liked this
Wait - it's ok for a doctor to ask inappropriate and unnecessary questions if it keeps a woman from getting an abortion, but otherwise it's an invasion of 'Merican privacy?
billsfan1104
by Jules on Sep. 16, 2013 at 7:47 AM
3 moms liked this
Almost everyone calls it Obamacare, and since when does it mean it's bigoted??
What does this have to do with race?


Quoting lga1965:

 Yeah, this is not a new thing and Obama doesn't care, the Doctors do....what the hell? Obamacare is a stupid name for the ACA. Can you BE any more bigoted, Carpy? What is your source, Breitbart? Ugh.

Saphira1207
by Bronze Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 7:47 AM
2 moms liked this

I agree with previous posters.  These questions have been asked for decades.


And, having worked in medical records myself for 11 years, and most of that using EMR, I know for a fact it isn't that easy to transmit anything out of the system.  For one, everything is in a different section which means you have to get out of one thing before you can send another, and two it doesn't matter who you are or what information you're looking at, the systems are set up so that they log who was looking at what, when and what they did with the information.  So it's really easy to see who sent what where and discipline as needed.

stringtheory
by Gold Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 7:48 AM
6 moms liked this
No source or section of the bill cited to show how it is the ACA that is driving cardiologists to ask these? How are they financially incentivized? Is it because insurance companies have always been the ones requiring these questions for their coverage and now because ACA requires insurance coverage, its Obama and the government keeping tabs on your medical information? Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence and all that jazz...
Carpy
by Ruby Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 7:50 AM
4 moms liked this

Have the answers been entered into a government database for years?

Quoting lhiannan:

Pretty sure i've been answering those questions for years....nothing new here.


Minnow Slayer

Debmomto2girls
by Platinum Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 7:53 AM
10 moms liked this

 It's a shame people are so busy being ignorant about the ACA and electronic health records they are overlooknig the absolute good they can do.  We have been trying to mandate and make electronic health records centralized and national for a long time. 

It would save lives, increase immunization rates and prevent many medical errors.

But, let's hate it because of Obama...so, so ignorant

LAHnTAH0812
by Bronze Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 7:54 AM
I simply don't answer anything I don't want to
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