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Another Common Core FAIL.. Fourth graders taught about "pimps" and "mobstaz"

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Fourth graders taught about ‘pimps’ and ‘mobstaz’ in Louisiana

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Published September 19, 2013

| FoxNews.com

Fourth grade students in Vermilion Parish, La. were given a homework assignment that included words like “Po Pimp” and “mobstaz,” but school officials said the worksheet was age appropriate based on an education website affiliated with Common Core education standards.

“I try to instill values in my son,” parent Brittney Badeaux told Fox News. “My goal is for him to ultimately to become a great man, a family man, a well-rounded man. And now my son wants to know what a pimp is.”

Badeaux was helping her 9-year-old son with his homework when she heard him say the words “Po Pimp” and “mobstaz.”

“I couldn’t believe it at first – hearing him read it to me,” she told Fox News. “So I looked at the paper and read the entire article. It was filled with Ebonics.”

The worksheet, obtained by Fox Radio affiliate KPEL provided contextual examples of the word “twist.” It included references to tornadoes and the 1950’s dance craze – the “Twist.”
But it also included a paragraph about “Twista” – a rapper with the group Speedknot Mobstaz who performs a single titled, “Po-Pimp.”

“It was really inappropriate for my child,” Badeaux said. “He doesn’t’ know what a pimp or mobster is.”

She also took issue with the school sending home a worksheet that intentionally misspelled words.

“I try to teach him morals and respect and to speak correctly,” she said. “It’s hard for a fourth grader to understand Ebonics when you’re trying to teach him how to spell and write correctly.”

Vermilion Parish School Superintendent Jerome Puyau told Fox News the “po-pimp” assignment was aligned to a fourth grade English Language Arts standard for Common Core.

“Out of context, this word is inappropriate,” Puyau said. “However, within the Common Core standards, they do want us to discuss real world texts.”

The Common Core State Standards initiative is a plan devised by the nation’s governors and backed by the Obama administration to set a uniform standard for grades K-12. In practice, it will ensure that every child in the nation reaches the same level of learning. So far, 45 states have agreed to use Common Core – including Louisiana.

“The Common Core curriculum, like it or not – we have to make our students successful,” the superintendent said. “We know that in New York proficiency in state testing was very low. We foresee that our students will not be successful unless with align everything to the common core standards.”

And that’s why fourth graders were learning about pimps and mobstaz.

“We want them to read real world texts,” he said. “We know they will go into a department store and see an album with that language on it. We know that will happen. But is that something they should be reading in the schools?”

Puyau conceded the actual paragraph in the assignment was not appropriate for 9-year-olds – even though Common Core-affiliated education site said it was.

“We are going to edit and audit everything that comes through,” he said. “In southwest Louisiana we do have high morals. We’re going to utilize everything that we have to ensure our parents that what they are reading is appropriate to grade level.”

Puyau said he takes full responsibility as the superintendent for what happened – but stressed that according to the Common Core standards – the material was age appropriate.

He said there is even more material out there that would cause parents to raise eyebrows and Badeaux said she heard something similar from her son’s teacher.

“The teacher told me this was the best of the worst of the curriculum that was provided to her,” she said. “We’re not even two months into school. What are they trying to teach him?”

Regardless, the superintendent said the pimp lesson provides a teachable moment for parents and teachers.

“These teachable moments are great to have,” he said. 

But try telling that to the mom who had to explain what a pimp is to her 9-year-old son.

“My son doesn’t know what pimps and mobstaz are!” wrote concerned mother Brittney Badeaux in an email to Hot 107.9′s DJ Digital. “I don’t condone ebonics at his young age.”
“I try to teach my son respect and morals,” Badeaux said. “My goal everyday (sic) is for him to become better for tomorrow and ultimately grow into a great man!”

Vermilion Parish School Superintendent Jerome Puyau said the worksheet is in accordance with Common Core standards adopted by Louisiana.

“Part of the Common Core is what they call ‘real-world text,’” Puyau explained. “What are our students reading?”

“Are these students going to see this on the shelves in our department stores?” he continued. “And the answer is yes. If you search it, the first thing that comes up is the actual song [“Po Pimp”]. This is real-world.”

Puyau said the worksheet was pulled from an education website that aligns itself with Common Core standards.

“The Twist” was controversial in the 50s, Puyau noted, and even the Harry Potter books once raised controversy in his district when a librarian wouldn’t stock the series because of its focus on witchcraft. 

The album “Kamikaze,” also mentioned under the rapper’s description, refers to suicide pilots, Puyau said, but this word is taught in history classes.

Badeaux also raised concerns about a similar text exercise that included a detailed description of how a machine gun works. But Puyau stressed that Vermilion Parish teachers review the content distributed to students, and it’s consistently in alignment with Common Core standards.

“We want to make sure that our students have an understanding and teaching of real-world life experiences through words, but there are teachable moments for parents, and there are teachable moments for us as educators.”





Thoughts?
by on Sep. 19, 2013 at 9:15 PM
Replies (31-40):
lga1965
by on Sep. 19, 2013 at 9:55 PM

 SO, don't justify them.  

 But I will tell you how I feel about homeschooling and I don't have to justify my reasons for thinking it is unecessary. ( and possibly harmful to children) :

Personally I think Public Schools are great. Always have been, are now. I think there is a huge fad, a new thing going on...a feeling that Moms need to homeschool or they will be "bad Moms" or that their precious kids will be mistreated at a public school. I think, based on the homeschooling Moms I know, that it is an escape, a way to keep kids from reality and overprotective behavior . It is a way to make sure that they are not exposed to parts of society that parents want to keep from them ( ie. Religious beliefs, for example) They prevent them from learning to cooperate in a group setting and prevent them from learning to respect and obey an authority figure ( the teacher) a lesson they need to learn before they are adults.Everyone does.

SO, a major attack on CommonCore is just another way homeschoolers justify keeping their kids home, protected.

And I don't have to justify anything I just said either.

Quoting autodidact:

Yes, several. None of which I feel the slightest need to justify to you. 

Quoting lga1965:

 I was asking the OP. And ,yes, people choose to homeschool because they don't approve of what is taught in schools.Right? Any other reason? LOL.

Quoting autodidact:

. . . and you associate that mentality with homeschooling. that would be the generalization. 

Quoting lga1965:

 Exactly WHAT am I generalizing about? She posts an article in which they zero in on words one teacher used in her class and decide that ALL Common Core is bad.

Crap.....

Quoting autodidact:

nice generalization. 

Quoting lga1965:

 Blame the teacher for the words, not "Common Core".

Geeeee, how desperate is everyone to bash schools?  Are you a homeschooler?


 


 


 

quickbooksworm
by Silver Member on Sep. 19, 2013 at 9:57 PM

Oh yes.  I think everything I read in 11th and 12th grade was actually banned at one point.


Quoting Lizard_Lina:

Wasn't Catcher In The Rye as well?


Quoting quickbooksworm:

Huck Finn was changed and/or banned due to period appropriate language.




Quoting worwalkerlds:

They shouldn't allow those kids to read "A Raisin in the Sun" or any other such works. They will have a fit with all of the incorrect grammar and references to things outside of the cultural norm.




T-HoneyLuv
by on Sep. 19, 2013 at 10:05 PM
I agree. Most kids where I live learn about these things from the streets. Shit, there are kids around here doing stick-ups and running dope at that age. Sad. :(


Quoting Mommabearbergh:

Yes really. Kids in the 21st century know about things earlier because society has forced them to. I knew about aids/HIV as a young kid because I had teenage siblings and the early90's it was all about awareness. With so much things out there kids are aware of a lot.



Quoting tooptimistic:




Quoting Mommabearbergh:

The teacher should have realized it wasn't age appropriate. In the fourth grade I knew what mobsters and pimps were.these kids probably know what they are but regardless its not age appropriate.







Really? I can honestly say that my first grade has never listened to rap music, and hopefully he will not be listening to it in fourth grade either. Most of it is not appropriate for children.

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autodidact
by Platinum Member on Sep. 19, 2013 at 10:08 PM

again, generalizing homeschoolers as against public education and against common core. 

and a very limited view of what constitutes homeschooling. 

Quoting lga1965:

 SO, don't justify them.  

 But I will tell you how I feel about homeschooling and I don't have to justify my reasons for thinking it is unecessary. ( and possibly harmful to children) :

Personally I think Public Schools are great. Always have been, are now. I think there is a huge fad, a new thing going on...a feeling that Moms need to homeschool or they will be "bad Moms" or that their precious kids will be mistreated at a public school. I think, based on the homeschooling Moms I know, that it is an escape, a way to keep kids from reality and overprotective behavior . It is a way to make sure that they are not exposed to parts of society that parents want to keep from them ( ie. Religious beliefs, for example) They prevent them from learning to cooperate in a group setting and prevent them from learning to respect and obey an authority figure ( the teacher) a lesson they need to learn before they are adults.Everyone does.

SO, a major attack on CommonCore is just another way homeschoolers justify keeping their kids home, protected.

And I don't have to justify anything I just said either.

Quoting autodidact:

Yes, several. None of which I feel the slightest need to justify to you. 

Quoting lga1965:

 I was asking the OP. And ,yes, people choose to homeschool because they don't approve of what is taught in schools.Right? Any other reason? LOL.

Quoting autodidact:

. . . and you associate that mentality with homeschooling. that would be the generalization. 

Quoting lga1965:

 Exactly WHAT am I generalizing about? She posts an article in which they zero in on words one teacher used in her class and decide that ALL Common Core is bad.

Crap.....

Quoting autodidact:

nice generalization. 

Quoting lga1965:

 Blame the teacher for the words, not "Common Core".

Geeeee, how desperate is everyone to bash schools?  Are you a homeschooler?


 


 


 


lga1965
by on Sep. 19, 2013 at 10:27 PM

 I know all about homeschooling. My daughter homeschooled for a year. We know two other families who homeschool. I know all about the curriculum. I know why they homeschool.

Here is another thing I know....homeschoolers think they know more than anyone else, that you have special knowledge.. You just demonstrated it.  Good luck with that. Some day  you will see that you don't ( nobody does )and it will be hard for you.

Quoting autodidact:

again, generalizing homeschoolers as against public education and against common core. 

and a very limited view of what constitutes homeschooling. 

Quoting lga1965:

 SO, don't justify them.  

 But I will tell you how I feel about homeschooling and I don't have to justify my reasons for thinking it is unecessary. ( and possibly harmful to children) :

Personally I think Public Schools are great. Always have been, are now. I think there is a huge fad, a new thing going on...a feeling that Moms need to homeschool or they will be "bad Moms" or that their precious kids will be mistreated at a public school. I think, based on the homeschooling Moms I know, that it is an escape, a way to keep kids from reality and overprotective behavior . It is a way to make sure that they are not exposed to parts of society that parents want to keep from them ( ie. Religious beliefs, for example) They prevent them from learning to cooperate in a group setting and prevent them from learning to respect and obey an authority figure ( the teacher) a lesson they need to learn before they are adults.Everyone does.

SO, a major attack on CommonCore is just another way homeschoolers justify keeping their kids home, protected.

And I don't have to justify anything I just said either.

Quoting autodidact:

Yes, several. None of which I feel the slightest need to justify to you. 

Quoting lga1965:

 I was asking the OP. And ,yes, people choose to homeschool because they don't approve of what is taught in schools.Right? Any other reason? LOL.

Quoting autodidact:

. . . and you associate that mentality with homeschooling. that would be the generalization. 

Quoting lga1965:

 Exactly WHAT am I generalizing about? She posts an article in which they zero in on words one teacher used in her class and decide that ALL Common Core is bad.

Crap.....

Quoting autodidact:

nice generalization. 

Quoting lga1965:

 Blame the teacher for the words, not "Common Core".

Geeeee, how desperate is everyone to bash schools?  Are you a homeschooler?


 


 


 


 

autodidact
by Platinum Member on Sep. 19, 2013 at 10:34 PM

oh for fuck's sake. 

Ok, please do tell me about my curriculum. 

I didn't say that I know more about homeschooling than anyone else, that I possess special knowledge.

I just know more about it than you do, and it's not special knowledge, just knowledge you don't have.  

Quoting lga1965:

 I know all about homeschooling. My daughter homeschooled for a year. We know two other families who homeschool. I know all about the curriculum. I know why they homeschool.

Here is another thing I know....homeschoolers think they know more than anyone else, that you have special knowledge.. You just demonstrated it.  Good luck with that. Some day  you will see that you don't ( nobody does )and it will be hard for you.

Quoting autodidact:

again, generalizing homeschoolers as against public education and against common core. 

and a very limited view of what constitutes homeschooling. 

Quoting lga1965:

 SO, don't justify them.  

 But I will tell you how I feel about homeschooling and I don't have to justify my reasons for thinking it is unecessary. ( and possibly harmful to children) :

Personally I think Public Schools are great. Always have been, are now. I think there is a huge fad, a new thing going on...a feeling that Moms need to homeschool or they will be "bad Moms" or that their precious kids will be mistreated at a public school. I think, based on the homeschooling Moms I know, that it is an escape, a way to keep kids from reality and overprotective behavior . It is a way to make sure that they are not exposed to parts of society that parents want to keep from them ( ie. Religious beliefs, for example) They prevent them from learning to cooperate in a group setting and prevent them from learning to respect and obey an authority figure ( the teacher) a lesson they need to learn before they are adults.Everyone does.

SO, a major attack on CommonCore is just another way homeschoolers justify keeping their kids home, protected.

And I don't have to justify anything I just said either.

Quoting autodidact:

Yes, several. None of which I feel the slightest need to justify to you. 

Quoting lga1965:

 I was asking the OP. And ,yes, people choose to homeschool because they don't approve of what is taught in schools.Right? Any other reason? LOL.

Quoting autodidact:

. . . and you associate that mentality with homeschooling. that would be the generalization. 

Quoting lga1965:

 Exactly WHAT am I generalizing about? She posts an article in which they zero in on words one teacher used in her class and decide that ALL Common Core is bad.

Crap.....

Quoting autodidact:

nice generalization. 

Quoting lga1965:

 Blame the teacher for the words, not "Common Core".

Geeeee, how desperate is everyone to bash schools?  Are you a homeschooler?


 


 


 


 


tooptimistic
by Kelly on Sep. 19, 2013 at 10:37 PM


The biggest issue with cc right now is it so hard to figure what applies, and what the standards are exactly.  Our teacher has been great about helping us break it down, to make sure our kids are exceeding the standards, but my little guy is only in first grade, so it is easy right now.

Quoting autodidact:

I found this, but it's unclear to which grade, if not all, it applies: 

Content

A.1.1 Address discrete elements of daily life

A.2.1 Address topics related to self and the immediate environment

A.3.1 Address concrete and factual topics related to the immediate and external environment

A.4.1 Address complex concrete, factual and abstract topics related to the immediate and external environment

Quoting tooptimistic:

Yeah, I looked too and you are right, there are so many common core sites!!  I wonder where the "real world language" part is..  I wonder if it is 4.1?


Quoting autodidact:

funny, nothing here about pimps or Mobstaz.

http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/4

Key Ideas and Details

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.3 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).

Craft and Structure

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.5 Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.6 Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.7 Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.
  • (RL.4.8 not applicable to literature)
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.9 Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.






coolmommy2x
by Gold Member on Sep. 19, 2013 at 10:39 PM
You're right.

Quoting Kmary:

Ok I'm not very fond of defending the Common Core, but this is a teacher/school/common sense issue more than a Common Core issue.  A teacher needs to preview every single thing he or she has the students read, watch, listen to, etc. and then use their common sense to see if it's appropriate.  Any person with half a brain would see those words (even if they're somehow "technically" common-core approved) and say, "Gee, I should probably pick a different text to give to my 4th grade students."

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redhead-bedhead
by on Sep. 19, 2013 at 10:48 PM
1 mom liked this

It's not only homeschoolers who are against the CCS. A simple Google Search of "Teachers against Common Core" brings up many news articles and blogs about teachers who are against them. I personally know several elementary and middle school teachers who all but one hate them.

Quoting lga1965:

 Blame the teacher for the words, not "Common Core".

Geeeee, how desperate is everyone to bash schools?  Are you a homeschooler?


Looking4Truth
by on Sep. 19, 2013 at 10:48 PM
1 mom liked this

 Good Grief!  It's ok for kids to learn complete and worthless garbage, but don't dare mention the word God.  Yep, this country has definitely been dumbed down.

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