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Another Common Core FAIL.. Fourth graders taught about "pimps" and "mobstaz"

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Fourth graders taught about ‘pimps’ and ‘mobstaz’ in Louisiana

By

Published September 19, 2013

| FoxNews.com

Fourth grade students in Vermilion Parish, La. were given a homework assignment that included words like “Po Pimp” and “mobstaz,” but school officials said the worksheet was age appropriate based on an education website affiliated with Common Core education standards.

“I try to instill values in my son,” parent Brittney Badeaux told Fox News. “My goal is for him to ultimately to become a great man, a family man, a well-rounded man. And now my son wants to know what a pimp is.”

Badeaux was helping her 9-year-old son with his homework when she heard him say the words “Po Pimp” and “mobstaz.”

“I couldn’t believe it at first – hearing him read it to me,” she told Fox News. “So I looked at the paper and read the entire article. It was filled with Ebonics.”

The worksheet, obtained by Fox Radio affiliate KPEL provided contextual examples of the word “twist.” It included references to tornadoes and the 1950’s dance craze – the “Twist.”
But it also included a paragraph about “Twista” – a rapper with the group Speedknot Mobstaz who performs a single titled, “Po-Pimp.”

“It was really inappropriate for my child,” Badeaux said. “He doesn’t’ know what a pimp or mobster is.”

She also took issue with the school sending home a worksheet that intentionally misspelled words.

“I try to teach him morals and respect and to speak correctly,” she said. “It’s hard for a fourth grader to understand Ebonics when you’re trying to teach him how to spell and write correctly.”

Vermilion Parish School Superintendent Jerome Puyau told Fox News the “po-pimp” assignment was aligned to a fourth grade English Language Arts standard for Common Core.

“Out of context, this word is inappropriate,” Puyau said. “However, within the Common Core standards, they do want us to discuss real world texts.”

The Common Core State Standards initiative is a plan devised by the nation’s governors and backed by the Obama administration to set a uniform standard for grades K-12. In practice, it will ensure that every child in the nation reaches the same level of learning. So far, 45 states have agreed to use Common Core – including Louisiana.

“The Common Core curriculum, like it or not – we have to make our students successful,” the superintendent said. “We know that in New York proficiency in state testing was very low. We foresee that our students will not be successful unless with align everything to the common core standards.”

And that’s why fourth graders were learning about pimps and mobstaz.

“We want them to read real world texts,” he said. “We know they will go into a department store and see an album with that language on it. We know that will happen. But is that something they should be reading in the schools?”

Puyau conceded the actual paragraph in the assignment was not appropriate for 9-year-olds – even though Common Core-affiliated education site said it was.

“We are going to edit and audit everything that comes through,” he said. “In southwest Louisiana we do have high morals. We’re going to utilize everything that we have to ensure our parents that what they are reading is appropriate to grade level.”

Puyau said he takes full responsibility as the superintendent for what happened – but stressed that according to the Common Core standards – the material was age appropriate.

He said there is even more material out there that would cause parents to raise eyebrows and Badeaux said she heard something similar from her son’s teacher.

“The teacher told me this was the best of the worst of the curriculum that was provided to her,” she said. “We’re not even two months into school. What are they trying to teach him?”

Regardless, the superintendent said the pimp lesson provides a teachable moment for parents and teachers.

“These teachable moments are great to have,” he said. 

But try telling that to the mom who had to explain what a pimp is to her 9-year-old son.

“My son doesn’t know what pimps and mobstaz are!” wrote concerned mother Brittney Badeaux in an email to Hot 107.9′s DJ Digital. “I don’t condone ebonics at his young age.”
“I try to teach my son respect and morals,” Badeaux said. “My goal everyday (sic) is for him to become better for tomorrow and ultimately grow into a great man!”

Vermilion Parish School Superintendent Jerome Puyau said the worksheet is in accordance with Common Core standards adopted by Louisiana.

“Part of the Common Core is what they call ‘real-world text,’” Puyau explained. “What are our students reading?”

“Are these students going to see this on the shelves in our department stores?” he continued. “And the answer is yes. If you search it, the first thing that comes up is the actual song [“Po Pimp”]. This is real-world.”

Puyau said the worksheet was pulled from an education website that aligns itself with Common Core standards.

“The Twist” was controversial in the 50s, Puyau noted, and even the Harry Potter books once raised controversy in his district when a librarian wouldn’t stock the series because of its focus on witchcraft. 

The album “Kamikaze,” also mentioned under the rapper’s description, refers to suicide pilots, Puyau said, but this word is taught in history classes.

Badeaux also raised concerns about a similar text exercise that included a detailed description of how a machine gun works. But Puyau stressed that Vermilion Parish teachers review the content distributed to students, and it’s consistently in alignment with Common Core standards.

“We want to make sure that our students have an understanding and teaching of real-world life experiences through words, but there are teachable moments for parents, and there are teachable moments for us as educators.”





Thoughts?
by on Sep. 19, 2013 at 9:15 PM
Replies (41-50):
tooptimistic
by Kelly on Sep. 19, 2013 at 10:53 PM


May I ask where you live?  The quality of public schools depends on where you live.

Where I live, the schools are not very good.  The classrooms are very over crowed and the teachers are not the best.  Having two with special needs (my son is high functioning autistic and my daugter has immunity issues) I don't expect the school to cater to their needs.  My son is reading on a fourth grade level and is in first grade.  With over thirty kids in a class, what is the teacher going to do to challenge him?  Is it fair to the other students if my son melts down because of all the noise?  NO. 

Not all schools are equal.

My son is learning how to respect authority figures.  At our childrens museum they offer classes in science, math, literature that he attends and completes work for.  It is a smaller class, so there are less sensory issues for him.  He does get a chance to work with others.

I am not being overprotective for thinking certain things (like music with explicit lyrics) are inappropriate for a child his age. 

Not that any of this is any of your business, nor do I need to explain.

Most home school families are very normal and have very legitimate reasons for homeschooling.

Quoting lga1965:

 SO, don't justify them.  

 But I will tell you how I feel about homeschooling and I don't have to justify my reasons for thinking it is unecessary. ( and possibly harmful to children) :

Personally I think Public Schools are great. Always have been, are now. I think there is a huge fad, a new thing going on...a feeling that Moms need to homeschool or they will be "bad Moms" or that their precious kids will be mistreated at a public school. I think, based on the homeschooling Moms I know, that it is an escape, a way to keep kids from reality and overprotective behavior . It is a way to make sure that they are not exposed to parts of society that parents want to keep from them ( ie. Religious beliefs, for example) They prevent them from learning to cooperate in a group setting and prevent them from learning to respect and obey an authority figure ( the teacher) a lesson they need to learn before they are adults.Everyone does.

SO, a major attack on CommonCore is just another way homeschoolers justify keeping their kids home, protected.

And I don't have to justify anything I just said either.

Quoting autodidact:

Yes, several. None of which I feel the slightest need to justify to you. 

Quoting lga1965:

 I was asking the OP. And ,yes, people choose to homeschool because they don't approve of what is taught in schools.Right? Any other reason? LOL.

Quoting autodidact:

. . . and you associate that mentality with homeschooling. that would be the generalization. 

Quoting lga1965:

 Exactly WHAT am I generalizing about? She posts an article in which they zero in on words one teacher used in her class and decide that ALL Common Core is bad.

Crap.....

Quoting autodidact:

nice generalization. 

Quoting lga1965:

 Blame the teacher for the words, not "Common Core".

Geeeee, how desperate is everyone to bash schools?  Are you a homeschooler?


 


 


 



tattedmommi
by on Sep. 19, 2013 at 10:56 PM
Wow
lizzielouaf
by Gold Member on Sep. 19, 2013 at 11:42 PM
1 mom liked this
I admire people who have the patience to homeschool because I do not.


Quoting tooptimistic:


May I ask where you live?  The quality of public schools depends on where you live.

Where I live, the schools are not very good.  The classrooms are very over crowed and the teachers are not the best.  Having two with special needs (my son is high functioning autistic and my daugter has immunity issues) I don't expect the school to cater to their needs.  My son is reading on a fourth grade level and is in first grade.  With over thirty kids in a class, what is the teacher going to do to challenge him?  Is it fair to the other students if my son melts down because of all the noise?  NO. 

Not all schools are equal.

My son is learning how to respect authority figures.  At our childrens museum they offer classes in science, math, literature that he attends and completes work for.  It is a smaller class, so there are less sensory issues for him.  He does get a chance to work with others.

I am not being overprotective for thinking certain things (like music with explicit lyrics) are inappropriate for a child his age. 

Not that any of this is any of your business, nor do I need to explain.

Most home school families are very normal and have very legitimate reasons for homeschooling.


Quoting lga1965:

 SO, don't justify them.  


 But I will tell you how I feel about homeschooling and I don't have to justify my reasons for thinking it is unecessary. ( and possibly harmful to children) :


Personally I think Public Schools are great. Always have been, are now. I think there is a huge fad, a new thing going on...a feeling that Moms need to homeschool or they will be "bad Moms" or that their precious kids will be mistreated at a public school. I think, based on the homeschooling Moms I know, that it is an escape, a way to keep kids from reality and overprotective behavior . It is a way to make sure that they are not exposed to parts of society that parents want to keep from them ( ie. Religious beliefs, for example) They prevent them from learning to cooperate in a group setting and prevent them from learning to respect and obey an authority figure ( the teacher) a lesson they need to learn before they are adults.Everyone does.


SO, a major attack on CommonCore is just another way homeschoolers justify keeping their kids home, protected.


And I don't have to justify anything I just said either.


Quoting autodidact:


Yes, several. None of which I feel the slightest need to justify to you. 


Quoting lga1965:


 I was asking the OP. And ,yes, people choose to homeschool because they don't approve of what is taught in schools.Right? Any other reason? LOL.


Quoting autodidact:


. . . and you associate that mentality with homeschooling. that would be the generalization. 


Quoting lga1965:


 Exactly WHAT am I generalizing about? She posts an article in which they zero in on words one teacher used in her class and decide that ALL Common Core is bad.


Crap.....


Quoting autodidact:


nice generalization. 


Quoting lga1965:


 Blame the teacher for the words, not "Common Core".


Geeeee, how desperate is everyone to bash schools?  Are you a homeschooler?




 




 




 





SewingMamaLele
by Leanne on Sep. 20, 2013 at 12:04 AM
Me too. I can see how my kids would totally benefit, but the fear I would fail them sets in. :(

Quoting lizzielouaf:

I admire people who have the patience to homeschool because I do not.




Quoting tooptimistic:


May I ask where you live?  The quality of public schools depends on where you live.

Where I live, the schools are not very good.  The classrooms are very over crowed and the teachers are not the best.  Having two with special needs (my son is high functioning autistic and my daugter has immunity issues) I don't expect the school to cater to their needs.  My son is reading on a fourth grade level and is in first grade.  With over thirty kids in a class, what is the teacher going to do to challenge him?  Is it fair to the other students if my son melts down because of all the noise?  NO. 

Not all schools are equal.

My son is learning how to respect authority figures.  At our childrens museum they offer classes in science, math, literature that he attends and completes work for.  It is a smaller class, so there are less sensory issues for him.  He does get a chance to work with others.

I am not being overprotective for thinking certain things (like music with explicit lyrics) are inappropriate for a child his age. 

Not that any of this is any of your business, nor do I need to explain.

Most home school families are very normal and have very legitimate reasons for homeschooling.



Quoting lga1965:

 SO, don't justify them.  



 But I will tell you how I feel about homeschooling and I don't have to justify my reasons for thinking it is unecessary. ( and possibly harmful to children) :



Personally I think Public Schools are great. Always have been, are now. I think there is a huge fad, a new thing going on...a feeling that Moms need to homeschool or they will be "bad Moms" or that their precious kids will be mistreated at a public school. I think, based on the homeschooling Moms I know, that it is an escape, a way to keep kids from reality and overprotective behavior . It is a way to make sure that they are not exposed to parts of society that parents want to keep from them ( ie. Religious beliefs, for example) They prevent them from learning to cooperate in a group setting and prevent them from learning to respect and obey an authority figure ( the teacher) a lesson they need to learn before they are adults.Everyone does.



SO, a major attack on CommonCore is just another way homeschoolers justify keeping their kids home, protected.



And I don't have to justify anything I just said either.



Quoting autodidact:



Yes, several. None of which I feel the slightest need to justify to you. 



Quoting lga1965:



 I was asking the OP. And ,yes, people choose to homeschool because they don't approve of what is taught in schools.Right? Any other reason? LOL.



Quoting autodidact:



. . . and you associate that mentality with homeschooling. that would be the generalization. 



Quoting lga1965:



 Exactly WHAT am I generalizing about? She posts an article in which they zero in on words one teacher used in her class and decide that ALL Common Core is bad.



Crap.....



Quoting autodidact:



nice generalization. 



Quoting lga1965:



 Blame the teacher for the words, not "Common Core".



Geeeee, how desperate is everyone to bash schools?  Are you a homeschooler?






 






 






 






kellysp6637
by on Sep. 20, 2013 at 12:07 AM
1 mom liked this

 WHHHHHHHHAAAAATTTTT???  That's HIGHLY inappropriate and I would be furious!

FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Sep. 20, 2013 at 12:12 AM

I would want to see this actual assignment. 

tooptimistic
by Kelly on Sep. 20, 2013 at 7:22 AM


In my situation, I just pray for patience daily, because for right now it is in the best interest of my kids.  Maybe later I  will put them in school.

Quoting lizzielouaf:

I admire people who have the patience to homeschool because I do not.


Quoting tooptimistic:


May I ask where you live?  The quality of public schools depends on where you live.

Where I live, the schools are not very good.  The classrooms are very over crowed and the teachers are not the best.  Having two with special needs (my son is high functioning autistic and my daugter has immunity issues) I don't expect the school to cater to their needs.  My son is reading on a fourth grade level and is in first grade.  With over thirty kids in a class, what is the teacher going to do to challenge him?  Is it fair to the other students if my son melts down because of all the noise?  NO. 

Not all schools are equal.

My son is learning how to respect authority figures.  At our childrens museum they offer classes in science, math, literature that he attends and completes work for.  It is a smaller class, so there are less sensory issues for him.  He does get a chance to work with others.

I am not being overprotective for thinking certain things (like music with explicit lyrics) are inappropriate for a child his age. 

Not that any of this is any of your business, nor do I need to explain.

Most home school families are very normal and have very legitimate reasons for homeschooling.


Quoting lga1965:

 SO, don't justify them.  


 But I will tell you how I feel about homeschooling and I don't have to justify my reasons for thinking it is unecessary. ( and possibly harmful to children) :


Personally I think Public Schools are great. Always have been, are now. I think there is a huge fad, a new thing going on...a feeling that Moms need to homeschool or they will be "bad Moms" or that their precious kids will be mistreated at a public school. I think, based on the homeschooling Moms I know, that it is an escape, a way to keep kids from reality and overprotective behavior . It is a way to make sure that they are not exposed to parts of society that parents want to keep from them ( ie. Religious beliefs, for example) They prevent them from learning to cooperate in a group setting and prevent them from learning to respect and obey an authority figure ( the teacher) a lesson they need to learn before they are adults.Everyone does.


SO, a major attack on CommonCore is just another way homeschoolers justify keeping their kids home, protected.


And I don't have to justify anything I just said either.


Quoting autodidact:


Yes, several. None of which I feel the slightest need to justify to you. 


Quoting lga1965:


 I was asking the OP. And ,yes, people choose to homeschool because they don't approve of what is taught in schools.Right? Any other reason? LOL.


Quoting autodidact:


. . . and you associate that mentality with homeschooling. that would be the generalization. 


Quoting lga1965:


 Exactly WHAT am I generalizing about? She posts an article in which they zero in on words one teacher used in her class and decide that ALL Common Core is bad.


Crap.....


Quoting autodidact:


nice generalization. 


Quoting lga1965:


 Blame the teacher for the words, not "Common Core".


Geeeee, how desperate is everyone to bash schools?  Are you a homeschooler?




 




 




 







SyllabaryBisque
by Bronze Member on Sep. 20, 2013 at 7:26 AM
1 mom liked this

I wouldn't want my child educated on the term "pimp" at that age; just like I wouldn't want him educated on "prostitute" at that age. It's just ridiculous.

tooptimistic
by Kelly on Sep. 20, 2013 at 7:28 AM


There are programs where the curriculum, books, workbooks, equipment is all provided, you have a teacher and online classes for the parent and child.  Programs like K12, Connections, Calvert Academy provide everything, pretty much follow the public school curriculum.  I use a program like that, make sure he is meeting all the benchmarks, and supplement from there.  It makes homeschooling a little less scary.  :)

Quoting SewingMamaLele:

Me too. I can see how my kids would totally benefit, but the fear I would fail them sets in. :(
romalove
by Roma on Sep. 20, 2013 at 7:29 AM
2 moms liked this

No one is ever happy.

Don't test, because they teach to the test, the tests are unreliable, etc.

Don't have standards, because some kids and some districts can't meet the standards and it's setting them up to fail.

Don't ease standards for some because that indicates those kids "can't" do what others can and/or because it waters the standards and makes them moot.

Just complain that public schools don't do enough or do everything poorly.


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