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Meanwhile, in Ohio you will work for your foodstamps **EDIT**

Posted by on Sep. 23, 2013 at 9:51 AM
  • 139 Replies

Ohio is introducing a work program for able bodied individuals on food stamps.

Ohio has long expected cash recipients to participate in a work program but in the case of foodstamps this is new.

Do you think work programs will make people feel better about all those "lazy poor people"?

What do you think would be a fair work exchange for say 200 a month in foodstamps?

I think working is great but when you have to put in 30 or 40 hours a week for 600 a month or much less that sounds like slave labor.

Thoughts?


**EDITED TO ADD**  This is about ablebodied people without dependants who get 138 a month in ohio.  20 hours a week for 138 a month.  Just for clarity.


How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


by on Sep. 23, 2013 at 9:51 AM
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bazjack
by Member on Sep. 23, 2013 at 9:56 AM
3 moms liked this

It shouldn't work out to less than minimum wage or it would be illegal, I think.

survivorinohio
by René on Sep. 23, 2013 at 9:56 AM

Kasich wants able-bodied adults to work for food stamps

By  Catherine Candisky

The Columbus Dispatch Saturday September 7, 2013 9:01 AM

 

Gov. John Kasich wants able-bodied recipients to spend 20 hours a week working, training for a job or volunteering.

Gov. John Kasich’s administration will limit food stamps for more than 130,000 adults in all but a few economically depressed areas starting Jan. 1.

To qualify for benefits, able-bodied adults without children will be required to spend at least 20 hours a week working, training for a job, volunteering or performing a similar type of activity unless they live in one of 16 counties exempt because of high unemployment. The requirements begin next month; however, those failing to meet them would not lose benefits until Jan. 1.

“It’s important that we provide more than just a monetary benefit, that we provide job training, an additional level of support that helps put (food-stamp recipients) on a path toward a career and out of poverty,” said Ben Johnson, spokesman for the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services.

For years, Ohio has taken advantage of a federal waiver exempting food-stamps recipients from the work requirements that Kasich championed while U.S. House Budget Committee chairman during the mid-1990s. Kasich and former Rep. Bob Ney, R-Heath, co-sponsored an amendment requiring able-bodied recipients without dependents to work that was included in sweeping welfare-reform legislation adopted in 1996.

“The governor believes in a work requirement,” Kasich spokesman Rob Nichols said yesterday. “But when the economy is bad and people are hurting, the waiver can be helpful. Now, fortunately, Ohio’s economy is improving.”

More than 1.8 million Ohioans receive food stamps, with the average individual benefit about $132 a month. Of them, an estimated 134,000 adults in 72 Ohio counties will be subject to the work requirements, including 15,000 in Franklin County. They are ages 18 to 50, without children under 18, and deemed to be physically and mentally able to participate, Johnson said.

County officials who administer public assistance and advocates for the poor predict the requirement will take food stamps away from thousands of Ohioans.

“The rolls will go down because of this. Some people will leave because of the requirement, and some won’t be able to meet it. It will be similar to what we saw with (welfare) rolls,” said Joel Potts, executive director of the Ohio Job and Family Services Directors’ Association.

More than 100,000 Ohioans have lost cash assistance since the beginning of 2011 as part of the federal crackdown on work requirements.

“We don’t have nearly enough places for 15,000 people” to work, said Lance Porter, spokesman for the Franklin County Department of Job and Family Services. Many of the “able-bodied” food-stamp recipients in the Columbus area have disabilities and are seeking Supplemental Social Security, an application process that can take months, even years.

“We don’t oppose the requirement, but most of these people have no other income than food stamps. Getting them transportation and other help to participate in work activities costs money,” said Jack Frech, director of the Athens County Department of Job and Family Services. “We’ll have 1,000 people subject to this requirement and there is no way we will have work sites for them. Every work site we have is already filled up by people working for cash assistance.”

The announcement comes the same week as a federal report showing hunger persists in Ohio despite signs of economic improvement. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1 in 6 Ohio families faced hunger last year, the 10th highest rate in the nation. And over the past decade, the percentage of families forced to skip meals or cut back on what they eat has grown 6.3 percentage points, higher than in all but two other states.

Ohio officials learned they would continue to qualify for a federal waiver of the work requirement because the recession made jobs scarce, but the Kasich administration wants to exempt only those in 16 Ohio counties where the two-year average unemployment rate was more than 120 percent of the national rate, Johnson said.

ccandisky@dispatch.com

survivorinohio
by René on Sep. 23, 2013 at 10:01 AM
1 mom liked this

Thats my issue with welfare work programs.

Anecdotal but none the less...  My SIL was unemployed for a few months while he and my dd were still married and they had to go on assistance.  He has an associated degree and was put to work as a case worker for Social security.  The presented it as an internship and assured him employment.  He stuck with it for 7 month all the while working 40 hour weeks for a total of 600 a month.  Bus passes were provided as well.  He was never offered the employment promised and he moved on eventually but what a trap from my perspective!  How can you do anything on 600 a mo and keeping in mind that 300 of that was foodstamps?.

Quoting bazjack:

It shouldn't work out to less than minimum wage or it would be illegal, I think.


How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


katy_kay08
by on Sep. 23, 2013 at 10:01 AM
8 moms liked this

I have no problem with the way the program is laid out in the article.  No where does it state that the recipient would not be paid for the work they are doing, only that being employed OR participation in work training programs would be necessary.  

I see nothing wrong with programs designed with timelines for self reliance.  I don't understand how anyone would have a problem with job training programs with a goal of getting people off government assistance.  Public assitance should always be a safety net not a lifestyle choice.  

bazjack
by Member on Sep. 23, 2013 at 10:05 AM
7 moms liked this

20 hours a week for $132 per month in benefits is absolutely insane - $1.65 an hour. It's forcing people to work for less than minimum wage because they can't find a job that pays minimum wage. That shouldn't be legal.

(And that's the AVERAGE benefit. Some people could find themselves working for less than a dollar an hour.)

viv212
by Gold Member on Sep. 23, 2013 at 10:06 AM
This sounds like a program for people on GR, or General Relief. I'm not sure what other states call it. The recipients have to be able bodied and also I know with our GR program, the people can have no drug record. It sounds like a good program... We'll see.
bazjack
by Member on Sep. 23, 2013 at 10:07 AM

It lists volunteering as one of the options. And there just aren't enough jobs and work training programs for everyone - if there were, we wouldn't have a problem. So they would have to volunteer, which by definition means they wouldn't be paid.


Quoting katy_kay08:

I have no problem with the way the program is laid out in the article.  No where does it state that the recipient would not be paid for the work they are doing, only that being employed OR participation in work training programs would be necessary.  

I see nothing wrong with programs designed with timelines for self reliance.  I don't understand how anyone would have a problem with job training programs with a goal of getting people off government assistance.  Public assitance should always be a safety net not a lifestyle choice.  



katy_kay08
by on Sep. 23, 2013 at 10:07 AM

They aren't expected to work and be paid in  food stamps.  The expectation is that they are either employed part time or participating in job training programs.   

Quoting bazjack:

It shouldn't work out to less than minimum wage or it would be illegal, I think.


bazjack
by Member on Sep. 23, 2013 at 10:12 AM

The expectation is that these people can find jobs - except if they could find reasonable jobs they wouldn't need the food stamps.


Quoting katy_kay08:

They aren't expected to work and be paid in  food stamps.  The expectation is that they are either employed part time or participating in job training programs.   

Quoting bazjack:

It shouldn't work out to less than minimum wage or it would be illegal, I think.




babygirl4326
by Member on Sep. 23, 2013 at 10:13 AM

BUMP!

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