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Charges dropped against Maryland parent who spoke against Common Core standards

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The Howard County father whose arrest became a viral web video and a cause celebre of conservative talk radio won't be prosecuted for disrupting a meeting on state education standards.

The Baltimore County state's attorney's office dropped assault charges Monday against Robert Small, who had been led out of the Thursday night meeting in Towson by an off-duty police officer. Small interrupted education officials, complaining that new standards were aimed at sending children to community colleges.

"It was clear that Mr. Small violated the rules of the meeting and disrupted the meeting. It was also clear that the officer acted appropriately and did have probable cause to make an arrest on both charges," the state's attorney's office said in a statement. "In the interest of justice, further prosecution will not accomplish anything more. Therefore, the charges have been dismissed."

Small, 46, has been discussed on Glenn Beck's radio show. Sean Hannity has reached out to him. Two lawyers offered to take his case for free, and people from across the country have sent emails offering help, while others have just written to praise him for standing up at the meeting. Maryland politicians have jumped in to defend Small and discredit the handling of the public meeting.

A relative unknown until Friday, Small's case spread over social media. A YouTube video of him being escorted out of the room by the police officer has been viewed more than 500,000 times.

In fact, it seemed that the only one not talking about it is Small. He gave a brief interview to The Baltimore Sun on Friday but has declined to comment since.

The Ellicott City father of two interrupted a public forum given by the Maryland State Department of Education on Thursday night at the Ridge Ruxton School on Charles Street in Towson. After a lengthy presentation by officials, members of the public were asked to submit their questions in writing. Baltimore County School Superintendent Dallas Dance then scanned the pile of questions and picked out ones to be read aloud.

A panel, which included state schools Superintendent Lillian Lowery, then answered the questions.

But Small wasn't satisfied that his question would be answered so he stood and interrupted Dance. He said he believed the new standards would lower expectations for students and that teaching would be aimed at getting students to community colleges rather than Harvard.

After being told, "Let's go," by an officer, Small continued to talk to the parents, saying, "Don't sit there like cattle." A Baltimore County police officer, who was working as a security guard, escorted Small out of the room, arrested him and charged him with assaulting a police officer and disturbing a school activity.

In an interview Friday morning, Small did not criticize the police actions but said he had a First Amendment right to speak. Small graduated from Baltimore County public schools, went on to a community college and got his four-year degree from the University of Maryland, College Park.

He said he is employed by the federal government and his two children attend Howard County public schools.

Many conservatives oppose the implementation of the new Common Core standards on the grounds that it is a federal government intrusion into local school control. Beck and others have talked about the new standards for months.

On his Monday morning radio program, Beck said Small's arrest was "a warning sign to the American people. I believe my job is to tell you the signposts. My job is to tell you how far down this road are you and how much farther do you have to go. Not much."

State Del. Patrick L. McDonough characterized as "outrageous" the failure of education officials to give Small a chance to speak. The Baltimore County Republican plans to introduce legislation that would put a moratorium on the implementation of the Common Core standards in the county's schools. Del. Ron George, a Republican candidate for governor, said Monday he wants address the common core standards in the next General Assembly session.

"I think education is best handled at the local community level," McDonough said.

Maryland was one of 45 states and the District of Columbia to adopt the Common Core standards, which were written collectively by the National Governors Association and the association of chief state school officers. The Common Core is not a federal requirement, but the Obama administration offered financial incentives to states that implemented the standards.

The state has trained 7,000 teachers for three summers in a row in the standards, and local school systems have been writing their own curriculum or lesson plans that align with the new standards.

All school systems in Maryland were required to begin teaching to the standards this school year.

Harford County Executive David R. Craig, a Republican candidate for governor, said Monday that he does not support the Common Core because he believes what is taught should be left up to classroom teachers. The former teacher and administrator said he believes the new standards are no better than what was required by the state under No Child Left Behind and that he is opposed to the amount of testing that would be required.

He also expressed concern about the way Thursday night's meeting was handled by education officials. In his many years of overseeing public meetings as a Harford County official, he said, he never had to have someone arrested, even when members of the public were upset and angry. "We always respect the people. ... Why not let them get up and speak and give their concerns?" he said.

Baltimore County schools spokesman Mychael Dickerson said the system had gotten dozens of comments from the public, either by phone or email.

Officials did not answer questions about whether they believed Small should have been arrested for his behavior at the meeting. But they did send out an email to parents explaining how their children's education would change this year and issued a brief statement to reporters.

"The meeting helped us realize that we must do a better job of communicating what the Common Core is and what it is not," the statement said. "We have to ensure that our parents and community members understand that the Common Core allows us to implement our own curriculum, written by us, for us."

The Baltimore County Police Department, which had been criticized for its handling of the arrest, issued a statement saying that while the department "strongly supports a citizen's right to exercise his or her First Amendment rights, it also recognizes that meeting organizers have the right to establish rules of order."

Baltimore County Police Chief James Johnson said in the statement that he will review the incident.

liz.bowie@baltsun.com

source


by on Sep. 24, 2013 at 7:57 AM
Replies (111-114):
lga1965
by on Sep. 25, 2013 at 3:34 PM
I can't wait for her answer....oh,wait, something tells me she won't answer and instead she will insult you and suggest that it's all Obana's fault for why she doesn't trust Harvard.

Quoting greenie63:

According to......................................................

The candlegal? Why don't you amuse me too! Harvard Graduate school of education , an Ivy league school, very costly extremely difficult to get into, isn't a reliable source. Yet their graduate program is one of the most desirable in this country and one I'd love to have on my resume. By the way it was ranked #3 best in education, preceded by Vanderbilt and Johns Hopkins (where I plan to do my graduate studies). http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-education-schools/edu-rankings?int=be1ea4

So candlegal, please once again amuse me, what is reliable for YOU

Quoting candlegal:

Wow, lol, Harvard hasn't been a reliable source for many years.




Quoting Carpy:

You may consider Harvard to be reliable, I don't.

Quoting greenie63:

Read "myth #1." This is a reliable source Harvard Graduate School of Education: 

http://hepg.org/hel/article/513

Volume 27, Number 5
September/October 2011

Five Myths About the Common Core State Standards



The Common Core State Standards are one of the most significant initiatives in American education in decades. Yet the swiftness with which they were developed and adopted has left educators uncertain about exactly what they are. A number of myths about the standards have emerged.

Myth #1 The Common Core State Standards are a national curriculum.
Americans have long had a leery view of a national curriculum, but the Common Core State Standards do not create this scenario. Standards are not curriculum: standards spell out what students should know and be able to do at the end of a year; curriculum defines the specific course of study—the scope and sequence—that will enable students to meet standards. There are many possible curricula schools could use that would lead students to the Common Core State Standards.

For example, one of the Common Core standards for English language arts in grade 5states: “By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4–5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.” This standard does not spell out how teachers will teach students to “read and comprehend literature.” Nor does it indicate which texts to use. The standards document includes a number of suggested texts that are of appropriate complexity (in grades 4 and 5, these include Antoine St. Exupéry’s The Little Prince, Robert Frost’s “Dust of Snow,” and Kadir Nelson’s We Are the Ship: The Story of Negro League Baseball), but these are meant to be examples, not a reading list. 

Myth #2 The Common Core State Standards are an Obama administration initiative.

The Obama administration is a strong supporter of the Common Core State Standards initiative, but the administration did not lead it. The initiative was, and continues to be, state-led.

No federal official was on the work teams and feedback groups that developed the standards. Then, once the standards were released, forty-five states and the District of Columbia—each acting on its own—chose to adopt the standards.

The Obama administration clearly supported the effort. In its Race to the Top program—a $4.3 billion competitive grant program that awarded funds to states that pledged reforms in four key areas—the administration awarded 40 points out of a possible 500 to states that adopted “a common set of K-12 standards” which were internationally benchmarked and that prepared students for colleges and careers-- such as the Common Core State Standards. States could conceivably have won the grants without adopting the Common Core standards specifically. In February 2010, President Obama said he might tie funds from the federal Title I program to adoption of the Common Core standards, but the administration never followed up on that plan. The administration provided incentives but did not force states to adopt the standards. 

The administration did provide $330 million to two state consortia to develop assessments to measure the Common Core standards, but these funds support development. States are building the assessments, and once the assessments are in place, they will be administered and operated by states. They are not federal tests.

Myth #3 The Common Core standards represent a modest change from current practice.
In preparation for adoption of the Common Core standards, several states conducted analyses that found considerable alignment between them and their current standards. Yet while the content of the two sets of standards is similar, the level of knowledge and skills the Common Core calls for is in many respects quite different from what current standards expect and what schools currently practice.

Take English language arts. Perhaps the main idea of the Common Core ELA standards is the notion that students should read increasingly complex texts in order to be prepared for the reading they will do in postsecondary education. Yet research the standards-writers relied upon showed that the complexity of texts assigned in high school has actually declined over time, while the reading requirements of entry-level college courses have increased. The Common Core Standards raise the expectations for text complexity considerably. 

Myth #4 States cannot implement the Common Core standards in the current budget climate.
Implementing the Common Core standards, which involves revising assessments, developing curriculum materials, providing professional development and tools for teachers, and other tasks, will cost money. And officials in 76 percent of districts in Common Core states said in a survey released in September 2011 by the Center on Education Policy that inadequate funds for implementation was a major challenge.
Yet the survey also found that 80 percent of districts had efforts to implement the standards under way or planned for 2011–2012. And more activities are likely once the assessments to measure the standards are in place.

Myth #5 The Common Core State Standards will transform schools.
Advocates have high hopes for the Common Core State Standards. They believe that a common set of expectations that are geared toward what students need to know to succeed after high school and that are benchmarked to the expectations of high-performing countries will lead to substantial improvements in student learning.

Yet even the most passionate advocate of standards will acknowledge that standards, by themselves, do not improve education. Standards can do a great deal: they can set clear goals for learning for students and teachers, and establish guidelines for instruction and performance. But to have an effect on the day-to-day interaction between students and teachers, and thus improve learning, states and districts will have to implement the standards. That will require changes in curricula and assessments to align with the standards, professional development to ensure that teachers know what they are expected to teach, and ultimately, changes in teacher education so that all teachers have the capability to teach all students to the standards. The standards are only the first step on the road to higher levels of learning.

Robert Rothman is a senior fellow at the Alliance for Excellent Education and the author of Something in Common: The Common Core Standards and the Next Chapter in American Education (Harvard Education Press, 2011).
Quoting Carpy:

Not by a long shot.

Quoting greenie63:

They still are. 

Quoting Carpy:

America produced the best and brightest when schools were controlled at the state and local level.

Quoting greenie63:

Ok after talking to some friends that went to the meeting, Robert Small was taken outside and assaulted the police officer which we can't see from the video. The security guard in the video is an off duty police officer.  Now as far as the meeting it was to help parents understand Common Core and questions were pre-submitted in advance to use at the meeting. Any further questions were asked to be held until the end of the meeting.

As I said before my verdict is still out because it's too early to see results. However, something needs to be done so children are ready to enter college. Too many enter college now needing remedial courses before they can take college level classes. I think too many are confused about Common Core and feel it may be some kind of indoctrination by the government, but I feel it's an attempt to improve a sad educational system in the US.  

NCLB isn't working, so my question to people up in arms is "what is your idea to make our educational system better and improving grades?" Do you have a plan? 








Posted on CafeMom Mobile
lga1965
by on Sep. 25, 2013 at 3:35 PM
1 mom liked this
I can't wait for her answer....oh,wait, something tells me she won't answer and instead she will insult you and suggest that it's all Obama's fault for why she doesn't trust Harvard.

Quoting greenie63:

According to......................................................

The candlegal? Why don't you amuse me too! Harvard Graduate school of education , an Ivy league school, very costly extremely difficult to get into, isn't a reliable source. Yet their graduate program is one of the most desirable in this country and one I'd love to have on my resume. By the way it was ranked #3 best in education, preceded by Vanderbilt and Johns Hopkins (where I plan to do my graduate studies). http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-education-schools/edu-rankings?int=be1ea4

So candlegal, please once again amuse me, what is reliable for YOU

Quoting candlegal:

Wow, lol, Harvard hasn't been a reliable source for many years.




Quoting Carpy:

You may consider Harvard to be reliable, I don't.

Quoting greenie63:

Read "myth #1." This is a reliable source Harvard Graduate School of Education: 

http://hepg.org/hel/article/513

Volume 27, Number 5
September/October 2011

Five Myths About the Common Core State Standards



The Common Core State Standards are one of the most significant initiatives in American education in decades. Yet the swiftness with which they were developed and adopted has left educators uncertain about exactly what they are. A number of myths about the standards have emerged.

Myth #1 The Common Core State Standards are a national curriculum.
Americans have long had a leery view of a national curriculum, but the Common Core State Standards do not create this scenario. Standards are not curriculum: standards spell out what students should know and be able to do at the end of a year; curriculum defines the specific course of study—the scope and sequence—that will enable students to meet standards. There are many possible curricula schools could use that would lead students to the Common Core State Standards.

For example, one of the Common Core standards for English language arts in grade 5states: “By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4–5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.” This standard does not spell out how teachers will teach students to “read and comprehend literature.” Nor does it indicate which texts to use. The standards document includes a number of suggested texts that are of appropriate complexity (in grades 4 and 5, these include Antoine St. Exupéry’s The Little Prince, Robert Frost’s “Dust of Snow,” and Kadir Nelson’s We Are the Ship: The Story of Negro League Baseball), but these are meant to be examples, not a reading list. 

Myth #2 The Common Core State Standards are an Obama administration initiative.

The Obama administration is a strong supporter of the Common Core State Standards initiative, but the administration did not lead it. The initiative was, and continues to be, state-led.

No federal official was on the work teams and feedback groups that developed the standards. Then, once the standards were released, forty-five states and the District of Columbia—each acting on its own—chose to adopt the standards.

The Obama administration clearly supported the effort. In its Race to the Top program—a $4.3 billion competitive grant program that awarded funds to states that pledged reforms in four key areas—the administration awarded 40 points out of a possible 500 to states that adopted “a common set of K-12 standards” which were internationally benchmarked and that prepared students for colleges and careers-- such as the Common Core State Standards. States could conceivably have won the grants without adopting the Common Core standards specifically. In February 2010, President Obama said he might tie funds from the federal Title I program to adoption of the Common Core standards, but the administration never followed up on that plan. The administration provided incentives but did not force states to adopt the standards. 

The administration did provide $330 million to two state consortia to develop assessments to measure the Common Core standards, but these funds support development. States are building the assessments, and once the assessments are in place, they will be administered and operated by states. They are not federal tests.

Myth #3 The Common Core standards represent a modest change from current practice.
In preparation for adoption of the Common Core standards, several states conducted analyses that found considerable alignment between them and their current standards. Yet while the content of the two sets of standards is similar, the level of knowledge and skills the Common Core calls for is in many respects quite different from what current standards expect and what schools currently practice.

Take English language arts. Perhaps the main idea of the Common Core ELA standards is the notion that students should read increasingly complex texts in order to be prepared for the reading they will do in postsecondary education. Yet research the standards-writers relied upon showed that the complexity of texts assigned in high school has actually declined over time, while the reading requirements of entry-level college courses have increased. The Common Core Standards raise the expectations for text complexity considerably. 

Myth #4 States cannot implement the Common Core standards in the current budget climate.
Implementing the Common Core standards, which involves revising assessments, developing curriculum materials, providing professional development and tools for teachers, and other tasks, will cost money. And officials in 76 percent of districts in Common Core states said in a survey released in September 2011 by the Center on Education Policy that inadequate funds for implementation was a major challenge.
Yet the survey also found that 80 percent of districts had efforts to implement the standards under way or planned for 2011–2012. And more activities are likely once the assessments to measure the standards are in place.

Myth #5 The Common Core State Standards will transform schools.
Advocates have high hopes for the Common Core State Standards. They believe that a common set of expectations that are geared toward what students need to know to succeed after high school and that are benchmarked to the expectations of high-performing countries will lead to substantial improvements in student learning.

Yet even the most passionate advocate of standards will acknowledge that standards, by themselves, do not improve education. Standards can do a great deal: they can set clear goals for learning for students and teachers, and establish guidelines for instruction and performance. But to have an effect on the day-to-day interaction between students and teachers, and thus improve learning, states and districts will have to implement the standards. That will require changes in curricula and assessments to align with the standards, professional development to ensure that teachers know what they are expected to teach, and ultimately, changes in teacher education so that all teachers have the capability to teach all students to the standards. The standards are only the first step on the road to higher levels of learning.

Robert Rothman is a senior fellow at the Alliance for Excellent Education and the author of Something in Common: The Common Core Standards and the Next Chapter in American Education (Harvard Education Press, 2011).
Quoting Carpy:

Not by a long shot.

Quoting greenie63:

They still are. 

Quoting Carpy:

America produced the best and brightest when schools were controlled at the state and local level.

Quoting greenie63:

Ok after talking to some friends that went to the meeting, Robert Small was taken outside and assaulted the police officer which we can't see from the video. The security guard in the video is an off duty police officer.  Now as far as the meeting it was to help parents understand Common Core and questions were pre-submitted in advance to use at the meeting. Any further questions were asked to be held until the end of the meeting.

As I said before my verdict is still out because it's too early to see results. However, something needs to be done so children are ready to enter college. Too many enter college now needing remedial courses before they can take college level classes. I think too many are confused about Common Core and feel it may be some kind of indoctrination by the government, but I feel it's an attempt to improve a sad educational system in the US.  

NCLB isn't working, so my question to people up in arms is "what is your idea to make our educational system better and improving grades?" Do you have a plan? 








Posted on CafeMom Mobile
greenie63
by Silver Member on Sep. 25, 2013 at 4:40 PM

Yep. 

Quoting lga1965:

I can't wait for her answer....oh,wait, something tells me she won't answer and instead she will insult you and suggest that it's all Obama's fault for why she doesn't trust Harvard.

Quoting greenie63:

According to......................................................

The candlegal? Why don't you amuse me too! Harvard Graduate school of education , an Ivy league school, very costly extremely difficult to get into, isn't a reliable source. Yet their graduate program is one of the most desirable in this country and one I'd love to have on my resume. By the way it was ranked #3 best in education, preceded by Vanderbilt and Johns Hopkins (where I plan to do my graduate studies). http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-education-schools/edu-rankings?int=be1ea4

So candlegal, please once again amuse me, what is reliable for YOU

Quoting candlegal:

Wow, lol, Harvard hasn't been a reliable source for many years.




Quoting Carpy:

You may consider Harvard to be reliable, I don't.

Quoting greenie63:

Read "myth #1." This is a reliable source Harvard Graduate School of Education: 

http://hepg.org/hel/article/513

Volume 27, Number 5
September/October 2011

Five Myths About the Common Core State Standards



The Common Core State Standards are one of the most significant initiatives in American education in decades. Yet the swiftness with which they were developed and adopted has left educators uncertain about exactly what they are. A number of myths about the standards have emerged.

Myth #1 The Common Core State Standards are a national curriculum.
Americans have long had a leery view of a national curriculum, but the Common Core State Standards do not create this scenario. Standards are not curriculum: standards spell out what students should know and be able to do at the end of a year; curriculum defines the specific course of study—the scope and sequence—that will enable students to meet standards. There are many possible curricula schools could use that would lead students to the Common Core State Standards.

For example, one of the Common Core standards for English language arts in grade 5states: “By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4–5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.” This standard does not spell out how teachers will teach students to “read and comprehend literature.” Nor does it indicate which texts to use. The standards document includes a number of suggested texts that are of appropriate complexity (in grades 4 and 5, these include Antoine St. Exupéry’s The Little Prince, Robert Frost’s “Dust of Snow,” and Kadir Nelson’s We Are the Ship: The Story of Negro League Baseball), but these are meant to be examples, not a reading list. 

Myth #2 The Common Core State Standards are an Obama administration initiative.

The Obama administration is a strong supporter of the Common Core State Standards initiative, but the administration did not lead it. The initiative was, and continues to be, state-led.

No federal official was on the work teams and feedback groups that developed the standards. Then, once the standards were released, forty-five states and the District of Columbia—each acting on its own—chose to adopt the standards.

The Obama administration clearly supported the effort. In its Race to the Top program—a $4.3 billion competitive grant program that awarded funds to states that pledged reforms in four key areas—the administration awarded 40 points out of a possible 500 to states that adopted “a common set of K-12 standards” which were internationally benchmarked and that prepared students for colleges and careers-- such as the Common Core State Standards. States could conceivably have won the grants without adopting the Common Core standards specifically. In February 2010, President Obama said he might tie funds from the federal Title I program to adoption of the Common Core standards, but the administration never followed up on that plan. The administration provided incentives but did not force states to adopt the standards. 

The administration did provide $330 million to two state consortia to develop assessments to measure the Common Core standards, but these funds support development. States are building the assessments, and once the assessments are in place, they will be administered and operated by states. They are not federal tests.

Myth #3 The Common Core standards represent a modest change from current practice.
In preparation for adoption of the Common Core standards, several states conducted analyses that found considerable alignment between them and their current standards. Yet while the content of the two sets of standards is similar, the level of knowledge and skills the Common Core calls for is in many respects quite different from what current standards expect and what schools currently practice.

Take English language arts. Perhaps the main idea of the Common Core ELA standards is the notion that students should read increasingly complex texts in order to be prepared for the reading they will do in postsecondary education. Yet research the standards-writers relied upon showed that the complexity of texts assigned in high school has actually declined over time, while the reading requirements of entry-level college courses have increased. The Common Core Standards raise the expectations for text complexity considerably. 

Myth #4 States cannot implement the Common Core standards in the current budget climate.
Implementing the Common Core standards, which involves revising assessments, developing curriculum materials, providing professional development and tools for teachers, and other tasks, will cost money. And officials in 76 percent of districts in Common Core states said in a survey released in September 2011 by the Center on Education Policy that inadequate funds for implementation was a major challenge.
Yet the survey also found that 80 percent of districts had efforts to implement the standards under way or planned for 2011–2012. And more activities are likely once the assessments to measure the standards are in place.

Myth #5 The Common Core State Standards will transform schools.
Advocates have high hopes for the Common Core State Standards. They believe that a common set of expectations that are geared toward what students need to know to succeed after high school and that are benchmarked to the expectations of high-performing countries will lead to substantial improvements in student learning.

Yet even the most passionate advocate of standards will acknowledge that standards, by themselves, do not improve education. Standards can do a great deal: they can set clear goals for learning for students and teachers, and establish guidelines for instruction and performance. But to have an effect on the day-to-day interaction between students and teachers, and thus improve learning, states and districts will have to implement the standards. That will require changes in curricula and assessments to align with the standards, professional development to ensure that teachers know what they are expected to teach, and ultimately, changes in teacher education so that all teachers have the capability to teach all students to the standards. The standards are only the first step on the road to higher levels of learning.

Robert Rothman is a senior fellow at the Alliance for Excellent Education and the author of Something in Common: The Common Core Standards and the Next Chapter in American Education (Harvard Education Press, 2011).
Quoting Carpy:

Not by a long shot.

Quoting greenie63:

They still are. 

Quoting Carpy:

America produced the best and brightest when schools were controlled at the state and local level.

Quoting greenie63:

Ok after talking to some friends that went to the meeting, Robert Small was taken outside and assaulted the police officer which we can't see from the video. The security guard in the video is an off duty police officer.  Now as far as the meeting it was to help parents understand Common Core and questions were pre-submitted in advance to use at the meeting. Any further questions were asked to be held until the end of the meeting.

As I said before my verdict is still out because it's too early to see results. However, something needs to be done so children are ready to enter college. Too many enter college now needing remedial courses before they can take college level classes. I think too many are confused about Common Core and feel it may be some kind of indoctrination by the government, but I feel it's an attempt to improve a sad educational system in the US.  

NCLB isn't working, so my question to people up in arms is "what is your idea to make our educational system better and improving grades?" Do you have a plan? 









Sisteract
by Whoopie on Sep. 25, 2013 at 4:56 PM
And we wonder why kids/ students are disruptive and impulsive... Looks like for some it might be genetic.

Quoting krysstizzle:

Free speech? There are processes for meetings like this, for a good reason. If everyone behaved as this man did, talking when they felt like it while ignoring everyone else, absolutely nothing would ever get done. It was be a melee of ignorant shouting louder and louder. 

Good grief. 

Quoting candlegal:

What has happened to free speech in this country?    Wow


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