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Charges dropped against Maryland parent who spoke against Common Core standards

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The Howard County father whose arrest became a viral web video and a cause celebre of conservative talk radio won't be prosecuted for disrupting a meeting on state education standards.

The Baltimore County state's attorney's office dropped assault charges Monday against Robert Small, who had been led out of the Thursday night meeting in Towson by an off-duty police officer. Small interrupted education officials, complaining that new standards were aimed at sending children to community colleges.

"It was clear that Mr. Small violated the rules of the meeting and disrupted the meeting. It was also clear that the officer acted appropriately and did have probable cause to make an arrest on both charges," the state's attorney's office said in a statement. "In the interest of justice, further prosecution will not accomplish anything more. Therefore, the charges have been dismissed."

Small, 46, has been discussed on Glenn Beck's radio show. Sean Hannity has reached out to him. Two lawyers offered to take his case for free, and people from across the country have sent emails offering help, while others have just written to praise him for standing up at the meeting. Maryland politicians have jumped in to defend Small and discredit the handling of the public meeting.

A relative unknown until Friday, Small's case spread over social media. A YouTube video of him being escorted out of the room by the police officer has been viewed more than 500,000 times.

In fact, it seemed that the only one not talking about it is Small. He gave a brief interview to The Baltimore Sun on Friday but has declined to comment since.

The Ellicott City father of two interrupted a public forum given by the Maryland State Department of Education on Thursday night at the Ridge Ruxton School on Charles Street in Towson. After a lengthy presentation by officials, members of the public were asked to submit their questions in writing. Baltimore County School Superintendent Dallas Dance then scanned the pile of questions and picked out ones to be read aloud.

A panel, which included state schools Superintendent Lillian Lowery, then answered the questions.

But Small wasn't satisfied that his question would be answered so he stood and interrupted Dance. He said he believed the new standards would lower expectations for students and that teaching would be aimed at getting students to community colleges rather than Harvard.

After being told, "Let's go," by an officer, Small continued to talk to the parents, saying, "Don't sit there like cattle." A Baltimore County police officer, who was working as a security guard, escorted Small out of the room, arrested him and charged him with assaulting a police officer and disturbing a school activity.

In an interview Friday morning, Small did not criticize the police actions but said he had a First Amendment right to speak. Small graduated from Baltimore County public schools, went on to a community college and got his four-year degree from the University of Maryland, College Park.

He said he is employed by the federal government and his two children attend Howard County public schools.

Many conservatives oppose the implementation of the new Common Core standards on the grounds that it is a federal government intrusion into local school control. Beck and others have talked about the new standards for months.

On his Monday morning radio program, Beck said Small's arrest was "a warning sign to the American people. I believe my job is to tell you the signposts. My job is to tell you how far down this road are you and how much farther do you have to go. Not much."

State Del. Patrick L. McDonough characterized as "outrageous" the failure of education officials to give Small a chance to speak. The Baltimore County Republican plans to introduce legislation that would put a moratorium on the implementation of the Common Core standards in the county's schools. Del. Ron George, a Republican candidate for governor, said Monday he wants address the common core standards in the next General Assembly session.

"I think education is best handled at the local community level," McDonough said.

Maryland was one of 45 states and the District of Columbia to adopt the Common Core standards, which were written collectively by the National Governors Association and the association of chief state school officers. The Common Core is not a federal requirement, but the Obama administration offered financial incentives to states that implemented the standards.

The state has trained 7,000 teachers for three summers in a row in the standards, and local school systems have been writing their own curriculum or lesson plans that align with the new standards.

All school systems in Maryland were required to begin teaching to the standards this school year.

Harford County Executive David R. Craig, a Republican candidate for governor, said Monday that he does not support the Common Core because he believes what is taught should be left up to classroom teachers. The former teacher and administrator said he believes the new standards are no better than what was required by the state under No Child Left Behind and that he is opposed to the amount of testing that would be required.

He also expressed concern about the way Thursday night's meeting was handled by education officials. In his many years of overseeing public meetings as a Harford County official, he said, he never had to have someone arrested, even when members of the public were upset and angry. "We always respect the people. ... Why not let them get up and speak and give their concerns?" he said.

Baltimore County schools spokesman Mychael Dickerson said the system had gotten dozens of comments from the public, either by phone or email.

Officials did not answer questions about whether they believed Small should have been arrested for his behavior at the meeting. But they did send out an email to parents explaining how their children's education would change this year and issued a brief statement to reporters.

"The meeting helped us realize that we must do a better job of communicating what the Common Core is and what it is not," the statement said. "We have to ensure that our parents and community members understand that the Common Core allows us to implement our own curriculum, written by us, for us."

The Baltimore County Police Department, which had been criticized for its handling of the arrest, issued a statement saying that while the department "strongly supports a citizen's right to exercise his or her First Amendment rights, it also recognizes that meeting organizers have the right to establish rules of order."

Baltimore County Police Chief James Johnson said in the statement that he will review the incident.

liz.bowie@baltsun.com

source


by on Sep. 24, 2013 at 7:57 AM
Replies (21-30):
candlegal
by Judy on Sep. 24, 2013 at 9:56 AM
3 moms liked this

They have learned about these staged meetings from Obama.   He does this all the time.   He doesn't want to answer any questions that he doesn't know the ansswer to and/or put him in a bad light.

Quoting yourspecialkid:

 

Quoting krysstizzle:

There is a process to meetings. Otherwise everyone would end up shouting over and around each other, interrupting and nothing would get done. 

He decided to interrupt and not listen to anyone else, so he was escorted out. Not that surprising. 

Quoting yourspecialkid:

 I think it was outrageous that he was not able to speak and appalling that he was manhandled and arrested.  This was a PUBLIC forum about PUBLIC education..as a parent he had a right to be there and a right to be heard.

Common Core is one of the factors in our decision to homeschool.


 You missed the big picture.  This was a public meeting about public education.  It was set up in such a way as to limit what the public wanted to discuss.  Doing so made it a staged meeting about public education. 

I attend public meetings all the time.  I have never been asked to submit questions in writing for them to be chosen from.  A lot of the time the meetings run long because they are answering all the questions.

I don't blame him for what he did.  He was invited to a PUBLIC meeting...not a STAGED one.

 


tooptimistic
by Kelly on Sep. 24, 2013 at 9:57 AM
3 moms liked this


Or something he can't read the answer to off the teleprompter.


Quoting candlegal:

They have learned about these staged meetings from Obama.   He does this all the time.   He doesn't want to answer any questions that he doesn't know the ansswer to and/or put him in a bad light.

Quoting yourspecialkid:

 

Quoting krysstizzle:

There is a process to meetings. Otherwise everyone would end up shouting over and around each other, interrupting and nothing would get done. 

He decided to interrupt and not listen to anyone else, so he was escorted out. Not that surprising. 

Quoting yourspecialkid:

 I think it was outrageous that he was not able to speak and appalling that he was manhandled and arrested.  This was a PUBLIC forum about PUBLIC education..as a parent he had a right to be there and a right to be heard.

Common Core is one of the factors in our decision to homeschool.


 You missed the big picture.  This was a public meeting about public education.  It was set up in such a way as to limit what the public wanted to discuss.  Doing so made it a staged meeting about public education. 

I attend public meetings all the time.  I have never been asked to submit questions in writing for them to be chosen from.  A lot of the time the meetings run long because they are answering all the questions.

I don't blame him for what he did.  He was invited to a PUBLIC meeting...not a STAGED one.

 




candlegal
by Judy on Sep. 24, 2013 at 9:58 AM
1 mom liked this

That is  probably the main reason.

Quoting tooptimistic:


Or something he can't read the answer to off the teleprompter.


Quoting candlegal:

They have learned about these staged meetings from Obama.   He does this all the time.   He doesn't want to answer any questions that he doesn't know the ansswer to and/or put him in a bad light.

Quoting yourspecialkid:

 

Quoting krysstizzle:

There is a process to meetings. Otherwise everyone would end up shouting over and around each other, interrupting and nothing would get done. 

He decided to interrupt and not listen to anyone else, so he was escorted out. Not that surprising. 

Quoting yourspecialkid:

 I think it was outrageous that he was not able to speak and appalling that he was manhandled and arrested.  This was a PUBLIC forum about PUBLIC education..as a parent he had a right to be there and a right to be heard.

Common Core is one of the factors in our decision to homeschool.


 You missed the big picture.  This was a public meeting about public education.  It was set up in such a way as to limit what the public wanted to discuss.  Doing so made it a staged meeting about public education. 

I attend public meetings all the time.  I have never been asked to submit questions in writing for them to be chosen from.  A lot of the time the meetings run long because they are answering all the questions.

I don't blame him for what he did.  He was invited to a PUBLIC meeting...not a STAGED one.

 





krysstizzle
by on Sep. 24, 2013 at 10:02 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting yourspecialkid:

 

Quoting krysstizzle:

There is a process to meetings. Otherwise everyone would end up shouting over and around each other, interrupting and nothing would get done. 

He decided to interrupt and not listen to anyone else, so he was escorted out. Not that surprising. 

Quoting yourspecialkid:

 I think it was outrageous that he was not able to speak and appalling that he was manhandled and arrested.  This was a PUBLIC forum about PUBLIC education..as a parent he had a right to be there and a right to be heard.

Common Core is one of the factors in our decision to homeschool.


 You missed the big picture.  This was a public meeting about public education.  It was set up in such a way as to limit what the public wanted to discuss.  Doing so made it a staged meeting about public education. 

I attend public meetings all the time.  I have never been asked to submit questions in writing for them to be chosen from.  A lot of the time the meetings run long because they are answering all the questions.

I don't blame him for what he did.  He was invited to a PUBLIC meeting...not a STAGED one.

 

I seriously doubt that was the only meeting they would ever have. If he wanted to voice his opinion without getting escorted out, he should have waited until the appropriate time. I've been to many public meetings. Sometimes they answer all questions until 3am (controversial rezoning is one that recently went that way), sometimes they limit the number of questions or amount of time someone has to speak, etc, etc. He can't be surprised that he was escorted out when he just stood up and interrupted the whole thing. 

Now, I'm all for free speech and shoot, if the only way you think you can make a point is to stand up and cause a spectacle, go for it. Seriously. I fully support civil disobedience, and I fully support a person's right to ignore the agenda of a public meeting and stand up and interrupt. Some messages I support, some I don't. But don't expect to not suffer any consequences whatsoever. That's just silly.

TranquilMind
by Platinum Member on Sep. 24, 2013 at 10:05 AM
4 moms liked this

He did nothing wrong.  The official leading the meeting made sure that no troubling questions would be asked by demanding the questions IN WRITING beforehand.  That's just ridiculous and a sign that there is something to hide.

Arresting him is just insane.  The forum should have been an open one to answer the actual questions of the parents present, not merely previously hand-selected questions by the government official!  I would have protested as well, had I been there.

 The Common Core IS a federal requirement if you want to be paid off by the Federal Government - and what public school doesn't want to take money from the government, no matter the cost?  Anyone who argues any differently is out of touch with reality.

Here is the really disturbing part about the Common Core.  Every state that adapts the Common Core State Standards by using either the Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) or the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC).  Both REQUIRE the FEDERAL GOVERNMENT TO HAVE ACCESS TO YOUR CHILD's SPECIFIC INDIVIDUAL DATA.    Before, the government could only have aggregate data, not specifically identifying the children (supposedly). 

These two organizations got millions in goverment money to develop assessments aligned to the Common Core and IN EXCHANGE each signed an agreement giving the Federal government full access to every child's individual data. 

If you want to see the information that you will be required to provide on your child -including SSN, religious belief, voting status, home ownership of parents, etc  - (Hello, identity theft!), you can see the FOUR HUNDRED data fields here:

http:://ow.ly/ovtqG.

Takes awhile to load.  ALL information on the page needs to be provided.  That is freaking scary, and you are simply in a coma if you think this is benign. 

How can this happen?  Well, President Obama and his administration decided to "reinterpret" the FERPA Act in 2012, which previously prohibited educational institutions from providing personally identifiable information without parental consent.  Now, under Obama's interpretation, the law no longer means this - the data is freely available to all who have a purpose or a connection to get it.  There are already student data bases in several states like NY, Mass, Colorado, Illinois and a couple of others.  

The States keep arguing that the CC does not "require" data sharing with the federal government, but it does, because the Consortia involved are REQUIRED and each state that adapts the Common Core will be a member of one of the two that are required to provide this information to the government at any time it desires (all for our "safety and convenience" of course). 

They have almost achieved the total cradle-to-grave tracking that is so desired and against which we must fight, if we still care about the 4th Amendment, that is.   

I'll take good old-fashioned independent education any day.  It served my kids well.  Thank God they will be at least college age before this kicks in. 

 

 

 

kayjayjess
by Member on Sep. 24, 2013 at 10:05 AM

More people need to research and speak out against Common Core. We need to get rid of it.

My children are the source of my strength, frustration, happiness, insanity, sanity, irritability.  They are the definition of unconditional love.

kcangel63
by Bronze Member on Sep. 24, 2013 at 10:05 AM
1 mom liked this
HOW did the cop act appropriately!!??? He was acting like a thug with a badge.
candlegal
by Judy on Sep. 24, 2013 at 10:07 AM
3 moms liked this

You are right, they do.   But as you can see they arrest people when they do to frighten others from doing the same thing.

Quoting kayjayjess:

More people need to research and speak out against Common Core. We need to get rid of it.


TranquilMind
by Platinum Member on Sep. 24, 2013 at 10:07 AM
2 moms liked this

 

WHEN is the "appropriate time", when the questions are previously-selected by those running the meeting, instead of asked openly on the floor?  This is precisely how they weed out troubling questions and keep information under wraps.

Quoting krysstizzle:


Quoting yourspecialkid:

 

Quoting krysstizzle:

There is a process to meetings. Otherwise everyone would end up shouting over and around each other, interrupting and nothing would get done. 

He decided to interrupt and not listen to anyone else, so he was escorted out. Not that surprising. 

Quoting yourspecialkid:

 I think it was outrageous that he was not able to speak and appalling that he was manhandled and arrested.  This was a PUBLIC forum about PUBLIC education..as a parent he had a right to be there and a right to be heard.

Common Core is one of the factors in our decision to homeschool.


 You missed the big picture.  This was a public meeting about public education.  It was set up in such a way as to limit what the public wanted to discuss.  Doing so made it a staged meeting about public education. 

I attend public meetings all the time.  I have never been asked to submit questions in writing for them to be chosen from.  A lot of the time the meetings run long because they are answering all the questions.

I don't blame him for what he did.  He was invited to a PUBLIC meeting...not a STAGED one.

 

I seriously doubt that was the only meeting they would ever have. If he wanted to voice his opinion without getting escorted out, he should have waited until the appropriate time. I've been to many public meetings. Sometimes they answer all questions until 3am (controversial rezoning is one that recently went that way), sometimes they limit the number of questions or amount of time someone has to speak, etc, etc. He can't be surprised that he was escorted out when he just stood up and interrupted the whole thing. 

Now, I'm all for free speech and shoot, if the only way you think you can make a point is to stand up and cause a spectacle, go for it. Seriously. I fully support civil disobedience, and I fully support a person's right to ignore the agenda of a public meeting and stand up and interrupt. Some messages I support, some I don't. But don't expect to not suffer any consequences whatsoever. That's just silly.

 

candlegal
by Judy on Sep. 24, 2013 at 10:09 AM

They didn't want anyone to question their authority.

Quoting TranquilMind:

He did nothing wrong.  The official leading the meeting made sure that no troubling questions would be asked by demanding the questions IN WRITING beforehand.  That's just ridiculous and a sign that there is something to hide.

Arresting him is just insane.  The forum should have been an open one to answer the actual questions of the parents present, not merely previously hand-selected questions by the government official!  I would have protested as well, had I been there.

 The Common Core IS a federal requirement if you want to be paid off by the Federal Government - and what public school doesn't want to take money from the government, no matter the cost?  Anyone who argues any differently is out of touch with reality.

Here is the really disturbing part about the Common Core.  Every state that adapts the Common Core State Standards by using either the Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) or the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC).  Both REQUIRE the FEDERAL GOVERNMENT TO HAVE ACCESS TO YOUR CHILD's SPECIFIC INDIVIDUAL DATA.    Before, the government could only have aggregate data, not specifically identifying the children (supposedly). 

These two organizations got millions in goverment money to develop assessments aligned to the Common Core and IN EXCHANGE each signed an agreement giving the Federal government full access to every child's individual data. 

If you want to see the information that you will be required to provide on your child -including SSN, religious belief, voting status, home ownership of parents, etc  - (Hello, identity theft!), you can see the FOUR HUNDRED data fields here:

http:://ow.ly/ovtqG.

Takes awhile to load.  ALL information on the page needs to be provided.  That is freaking scary, and you are simply in a coma if you think this is benign. 

How can this happen?  Well, President Obama and his administration decided to "reinterpret" the FERPA Act in 2012, which previously prohibited educational institutions from providing personally identifiable information without parental consent.  Now, under Obama's interpretation, the law no longer means this - the data is freely available to all who have a purpose or a connection to get it.  There are already student data bases in several states like NY, Mass, Colorado, Illinois and a couple of others.  

The States keep arguing that the CC does not "require" data sharing with the federal government, but it does, because the Consortia involved are REQUIRED and each state that adapts the Common Core will be a member of one of the two that are required to provide this information to the government at any time it desires (all for our "safety and convenience" of course). 

They have almost achieved the total cradle-to-grave tracking that is so desired and against which we must fight, if we still care about the 4th Amendment, that is.   

I'll take good old-fashioned independent education any day.  It served my kids well.  Thank God they will be at least college age before this kicks in. 

 

 

 


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