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I don't have a child in school so please help me out here

Posted by on Sep. 24, 2013 at 10:38 PM
  • 12 Replies

What is Common Core?  Today is the first I have heard of it.

by on Sep. 24, 2013 at 10:38 PM
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-Celestial-
by Pepperlynn on Sep. 24, 2013 at 10:50 PM
-Celestial-
by Pepperlynn on Sep. 24, 2013 at 10:50 PM

The Standards

Building on the excellent foundation of standards states have laid, the Common Core State Standards are the first step in providing our young people with a high-quality education. It should be clear to every student, parent, and teacher what the standards of success are in every school.

Teachers, parents and community leaders have all weighed in to help create the Common Core State Standards. The standards clearly communicate what is expected of students at each grade level. This will allow our teachers to be better equipped to know exactly what they need to help students learn and establish individualized benchmarks for them. The Common Core State Standards focus on core conceptual understandings and procedures starting in the early grades, thus enabling teachers to take the time needed to teach core concepts and procedures well—and to give students the opportunity to master them.

With students, parents and teachers all on the same page and working together for shared goals, we can ensure that students make progress each year and graduate from school prepared to succeed in college and in a modern workforce.

To appropriately cite the Common Core State Standards, use the following:

 

Authors: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers

Title: Common Core State Standards (insert specific content area if you are using only one)

Publisher: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington D.C.

Copyright Date: 2010

jllcali
by Jane on Sep. 24, 2013 at 11:23 PM
1 mom liked this
I'm in Texas, which hasn't adopted common core (no money in it for rick perry) so I don't know.
muslimah
by on Sep. 25, 2013 at 1:36 AM
5 moms liked this

 Good question. When it comes to school my kid is on her own. I have nothing good to say about the public school system especially when they send home work for me to do.

It doesn't happen much any more now that she is high school but when she was younger those stupid teachers would send home work for the parent. I always sent it back unfinished with a note to the teacher letting them know that I already went to school and they need to do their job they get paid for and stop sending stuff for me to do.

 

momtimesx4
by Silver Member on Sep. 25, 2013 at 1:55 AM

It used to be that the educational material for the local schools was decided by the local schools and community, hence the Independent School District system

Problem is that many schools are lacking at teaching the basics, local communities don't give 2 shits so they turn to find an outside solution. 

Somewhere along the line people decided that instead of having some mediocre schools, decent schools, outstanding schools and kick-ass schools, standardized testing popped up so that everyone, no matter the school would take the same/similar test to make sure that skills were being mastered by the students.

For some schools, that did not work.  So they began teaching the test, instead of teaching the material.  As a result, some schools moved up in the ratings but the students really were not really learning.  

Plus the academic tests varied from state to state thus the still unlevel playing field.  Make it where every school teaches the exact same material so Johnny in Bugtussle, Oklahoma and Janie in Puyallup, Washington would learn the exact same things.

The teaching then became packaged into kits.

Now are those students really learning?  Did it enable the schools to move from mediocre to outstanding or even kick ass?  No...it forced many schools to teach at the lowest common denominator.

At the same time, the schools in areas where the people that didn't really care about education, didn't really change.


AlekD
by Gold Member on Sep. 25, 2013 at 2:39 AM
1 mom liked this
Its the eeeeeend of the woooooorld.
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UpSheRises
by Platinum Member on Sep. 25, 2013 at 6:38 AM

My child is in private school so i have barely paid attention to it.

It's a standard of best practices.

Why does the federal government feel that school aren't able to make changes and improvements on their own? I don't know.

Why do they think every school comes out of a cookie cutter? Also don't know.

Do i think it makes school a government indoctrination camp? No, i'm not paranoid schizophrenic.


UpSheRises
by Platinum Member on Sep. 25, 2013 at 6:39 AM

Great response.

Quoting momtimesx4:

It used to be that the educational material for the local schools was decided by the local schools and community, hence the Independent School District system

Problem is that many schools are lacking at teaching the basics, local communities don't give 2 shits so they turn to find an outside solution. 

Somewhere along the line people decided that instead of having some mediocre schools, decent schools, outstanding schools and kick-ass schools, standardized testing popped up so that everyone, no matter the school would take the same/similar test to make sure that skills were being mastered by the students.

For some schools, that did not work.  So they began teaching the test, instead of teaching the material.  As a result, some schools moved up in the ratings but the students really were not really learning.  

Plus the academic tests varied from state to state thus the still unlevel playing field.  Make it where every school teaches the exact same material so Johnny in Bugtussle, Oklahoma and Janie in Puyallup, Washington would learn the exact same things.

The teaching then became packaged into kits.

Now are those students really learning?  Did it enable the schools to move from mediocre to outstanding or even kick ass?  No...it forced many schools to teach at the lowest common denominator.

At the same time, the schools in areas where the people that didn't really care about education, didn't really change.




idunno1234
by Silver Member on Sep. 25, 2013 at 6:48 AM
1 mom liked this

The schools my kids are in are presenting it as raising the bar and I'm already in a state with a pretty high bar.  There are new rigorous tests that are going to be administered every year,I believe starting this year.

Teaching to the test sucks but I don't know another way to make sure that all kids are being held to the same fairly high standard.  Honestly, it should have been done a long time ago because no matter where a child goes to school, the bar should be set the same and there's no reason why the US, considering we spend the most per capita on education, shouldn't be at the top of the global list.

In my perfect world, our educational system would be totally rehauled, with teaching being much more dynamic, much less cookie cutter and schools would be filled with the kind of teachers we all remember as our favorite teacher.  Can you imagine how cool that would be??

I also believe that teaching should be year round with more frequent breaks and that the majority if homework should be banned- most homework is bs and totally unnecessary. 

alc4evermom
by on Sep. 25, 2013 at 6:58 AM


I'm not paranoid either, or suffering from a severe mental illness that isn't really a fair condition to be mocked at, but I do believe on some levels, at least for public school, that it IS an Indoctrine camp.  With corporate sponsors and big government having a say in what we should learn, eat, and how to behave, they are setting children up to not only become good consumers, but how to follow orders.  If you don't follow orders, they tell your parents to drug you into submission.  It's not just about reading and math;  school is also a social structure that now operates behind locked doors.  

Quoting UpSheRises:

My child is in private school so i have barely paid attention to it.

It's a standard of best practices.

Why does the federal government feel that school aren't able to make changes and improvements on their own? I don't know.

Why do they think every school comes out of a cookie cutter? Also don't know.

Do i think it makes school a government indoctrination camp? No, i'm not paranoid schizophrenic.




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