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ACA Home Visits?

Posted by on Sep. 26, 2013 at 6:09 PM
  • 8 Replies


It's in the bill. Health and Human Services is making grants to states and agencies who are willing to perform "evidence-based home visits" connected to ObamaCare. What is the purpose of these visits? The grant guidelines don't exactly say, but they do spell out in detail who might receive them:

a) Eligible families who reside in communities in need of such services, as identified in the statewide needs assessment required under subsection (b)(1)(A).

b) Low-income eligible families.

c) Eligible families who are pregnant women who have not attained age 21.

d) Eligible families that have a history of child abuse or neglect or have had interactions with child welfare services.

e) Eligible families that have a history of substance abuse or need substance abuse treatment.

f) Eligible families that have users of tobacco products in the home.

g) Eligible families that are or have children with low student achievement.

h) Eligible families with children with developmental delays or disabilities.

i) Eligible families who, or that include individuals who, are serving or formerly served in the Armed Forces, including such families that have members of the Armed Forces who have had multiple deployments outside of the United States.

By "eligible families" they presumably mean eligible for premium subsidies, and that covers a whole lot of people. As for the categories offered here, it seems just about everyone would fit into at least one of them, yes?

Why do you need to get a visit from someone connected to ObamaCare because of your child's grades? Tobacco use? Not wise, but not against the law, so why do they need to come and see you about it? Interactions with child welfare services? A serious matter, but what exactly is the reason the federal government wants you to get a visit in connection with ObamaCare?

You realize what this is, right? Once the government (or "society" as liberals are fond of saying these days) is responsible for subsidizing your health care, they've got an inherent interest in your lifestyle. They've got a financial stake. If you were just paying the bills yourself, it would affect no one but you. But now that we've got a system of third-party payers mandated and subsidized by the government, it's no longer just your business if you smoke or, I guess, if your kid gets poor grades.

You will get a visit!

Many of us warned of this sort of thing during the original debates. It's bad enough that an insurance company gets to question you about this stuff, but when someone backed by the force of law can knock on your door and demand to know why you smoke . . . now do you see why Ted Cruz talked all those hours?

UPDATE: Some on the left are responding to this by a) claiming the visits are "voluntary"; and b) passing around a Snopes link that claims the story is false. The response to both A and B is the same. The Snopes piece emphasizes that the home visits are not "forced," and that is true, which technically makes it "voluntary" in the sense that you don't have to let them in. But that is misleading and beside the point.

It is not "voluntary" in the sense that you call up the government and say, "Hey, I can't quit smoking, is there someone the government can send over?" They reach out to you and seek to arrange a visit. You don't have to agree, but once the government has flagged your home as an issue worthy of a home visit, what happens after you refuse the visit? These are the people who are subsidizing your insurance, and they've just told you they need to speak with you. Yeah, sure, that's "voluntary."

It's a great example of how politicians use words to make things sound very different from what they really are.


http://www.caintv.com/are-you-ready-for-obamacare-ho


Just caught this on my news feed, didn't really have a chance to look into it at all... but, thoughts?  I'm not one to jump on conspiracy theory bandwagons, but the government intruding more than necessary into peoples lives does set me on alert. 

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by on Sep. 26, 2013 at 6:09 PM
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cjsbmom
by Lois Lane on Sep. 26, 2013 at 6:11 PM
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This provision of the ACA is offering IN HOME treatment for people in that category. It's not a way for big brother to come check up on you. It's an option you have if you qualify to receive medical or counseling services without having to leave your own home. 

Krikey. People really need to read the actual law instead of just relying on these conspiracy theory blogs and sites. 

katy_kay08
by on Sep. 26, 2013 at 6:18 PM

a little research on your part would have shown that the funding is for state programs already in existence and the programs are voluntary.  

SewingMamaLele
by Leanne on Sep. 26, 2013 at 6:18 PM
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Quoting cjsbmom:

This provision of the ACA is offering IN HOME treatment for people in that category. It's not a way for big brother to come check up on you. It's an option you have if you qualify to receive medical or counseling services without having to leave your own home. 

Krikey. People really need to read the actual law instead of just relying on these conspiracy theory blogs and sites. 

Why would a person need a home visit because they smoke, or have a child not getting good grades, or have young pregnant women?   I can understand home visits for developmental issues, elder care, etc... but what is the purpose of home visits for the rest?

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DSamuels
by Gold Member on Sep. 26, 2013 at 6:18 PM
Sounds a bit out there, but I wouldn't be surprised.
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katy_kay08
by on Sep. 26, 2013 at 6:20 PM

Bloggers say Obamacare provision will allow 'forced home inspections'

A startling Obamacare claim swept from blog to blog last week: "SHOCKING: Obamacare Provision Will Allow ‘Forced’ Home Inspections."

One blogger used a photo of armed officersentering a cottage, with the overline, "We’re from the government and we’re here to raid your home." Another said "this is why the IRS has been training with AR-15s."

A reader sent us a post from BenSwann.com, "Obamacare provision: ‘Forced’ home inspections."

He wondered if it were true. So did we.

South Carolina’s concern

"Forced home inspections"? Um, no.

The flurry originated with BenSwann.com blogger Joshua Cook on Aug. 13. He picked up the phrase "forced home inspections" from a state lawmaker in South Carolina.

Back in March, as a group of state legislators discussed a bill to fight the Affordable Care Act, Rep. Rick Quinn offered a specific example of something in the law that worried him: "The forced home inspections that I’ve heard about."

Cook was there. And the comment nagged him. He noticed people weren’t really writing about the issue.

"It's just been bothering me," he told PolitiFact.

So he wrote about it last week, talking with an attorney who spoke at the committee hearing and posting a video clip of Quinn’s comment.

"The point is South Carolina legislators believe it, and are convinced this is going to happen," Cook told us.

Quinn, indeed, had added an amendment to the South Carolina Freedom of Health Care Protection Act to prevent state workers from conducting any "involuntary … in-home visitation." It passed the House, but the Senate didn’t have a chance to vote. Cook says lawmakers hope to revive the legislation in the next session.

But that Obamacare program that worries Quinn? It already is — by statute — voluntary.

There’s literally nothing to suggest raids or weapons.

Home visiting programs

Concerned bloggers pointed to an Obamacare-funded grant program for "maternal, infant and early childhood home visiting." In 2011, the government announced $224 million in funding.

Most of those grants are going to health departments — none, so far, in South Carolina.

The idea: fund visits from nurses and social workers to high-risk families to help them develop skills to keep kids healthy, get them ready for school, and prevent child abuse and neglect.

Home-visit programs already existed in 40 states.

But to Kent Masterson Brown, a health care litigator invited by South Carolina lawmakers to help them avoid implementing Obamacare, the programs suggest overzealous nonprofits telling parents how to raise their children without their consent.

Brown raises the specter of a home-schooling family subject to "intervention" for school readiness, their children forced into schools and onto medications and vaccines.

"The federal government will now set the standards for raising children and will enforce them by home visits," he wrote about the law.

But consent is built into the program.

A home visitor could no more compel a family to vaccinate kids than a pediatrician could, said Kay Johnson, a professor of pediatrics at Dartmouth Medical School who’s one of the nation’s experts on state home visiting policy.

Here’s what the Affordable Care Act says: Home-visiting programs must assure they’ll have procedures that ensure "the participation of each eligible family in the program is voluntary."

Here’s how that might work, according to Sara Rosenbaum, a professor of health law and policy at George Washington University, who supports such programs.

A low-income mom gets her prenatal care at a community health center. Her doctor asks if she would like visits from a nurse after the baby comes to offer tips and answer questions.

Mom could say yes — or no.

It’s like the old days of health care, Rosenbaum said, when nurses would visit families to show how to breastfeed, sterilize bottles, care for babies and cope when you’re exhausted.

"It's real health education in the home, is the purpose of it," she said.

Such programs have a long history backed by peer-reviewed research, she said. They work.

"They make sure that you don't go home to nothing. It's done to help families, not to police them."

classic randomized trial in Elmira, N.Y., showed nurse visits to families of newborns reduced child abuse and neglect, even years later. They also reduced government spending for low-income unmarried women.

Brown, the lawyer, says he’s concerned families have no protection from social workers. He’s concerned workers won’t be well-trained and will overstep families’ rights.

Nobody should knock on your door without a badge, he said.

"What I see in this is a monster, frankly. And you can quote me on that," he said.

That’s the fear.

The law, however, specifies that programs be voluntary, their staffs trained and supervised, and the home-visiting models they follow based on strong research.

Any "forced home inspection" wouldn’t be under the law — it would be in direct opposition to it.

And if a family welcomed help but later decided it made them uncomfortable?

Samantha Miller, a spokeswoman for the U.S. agency administering the program, said families could stop accepting services "without consequence at any time and for any reason."

Our ruling

Bloggers passed around a claim last week that a provision of the new health care law will allow "forced" home inspections by government agents.

But the program they pointed to provides grants for voluntary help to at-risk families from trained staff like nurses and social workers.

What bloggers describe would be an egregious abuse of the law — not what’s allowed by it. We rate the claim Pants on Fire.

furbabymum
by Gold Member on Sep. 26, 2013 at 6:21 PM

 What in home treatment would be required for a smoker, someone whose kids are bad at school, neglected or abused kids, etc? What would they be treating for those that DFS isn't???

Would you be ok with them adding Obese to the list?

Quoting cjsbmom:

This provision of the ACA is offering IN HOME treatment for people in that category. It's not a way for big brother to come check up on you. It's an option you have if you qualify to receive medical or counseling services without having to leave your own home. 

Krikey. People really need to read the actual law instead of just relying on these conspiracy theory blogs and sites. 

 

DSamuels
by Gold Member on Sep. 26, 2013 at 6:21 PM
If you are on the exchange they will know if you smoke, it's one of the questions they ask. I went to the Kaiser website about it and plugged in different answers to see costs. With 2 smokers there is a surcharge of over $6000 a year with no maximum ceiling they can charge.
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yourspecialkid
by Platinum Member on Sep. 26, 2013 at 9:12 PM

 Wondering why they would need to visit and what sort of service would be provided by the veteran that gets flagged.

 

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