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Priests threatened with arrest if they minister to military during shutdown

Posted by on Oct. 4, 2013 at 10:59 PM
  • 73 Replies

Priests threatened with arrest if they minister to military during shutdown

 
Posted Friday, October 4th 2013 @ 4pm  by Alex Pappas

In a stunning development, some military priests are facing arrest if they celebrate mass or practice their faith on military bases during the federal government shutdown.

“With the government shutdown, many [government service] and contract priests who minister to Catholics on military bases worldwide are not permitted to work – not even to volunteer,” wrote John Schlageter, the general counsel for the Archdiocese for the Military Services USA, in an op-ed this week. “During the shutdown, it is illegal for them to minister on base and they risk being arrested if they attempt to do so.”

According to its website, the Archdiocese for the Military Services “provides the Catholic Church’s full range of pastoral ministries and spiritual services to those in the United States Armed Forces.”

Read more from The Daily Caller


Read more: http://www.kfiam640.com/articles/national-news-104668/priests-threatened-with-arrest-if-they-11712489/#ixzz2goRmaj6Y

by on Oct. 4, 2013 at 10:59 PM
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Replies (1-10):
TruthSeeker.
by Milami on Oct. 4, 2013 at 11:20 PM
4 moms liked this

 Ok, that is ridiculous. If they want to VOLUNTEER to minister why would they face arrest? That makes no sense. It takes no money out of anyone's pocket and hurts no one for them to minister to people who probably need it the most right now!!!

Bonnie_
by Bronze Member on Oct. 4, 2013 at 11:22 PM



Quoting Bonnie_:

Priests threatened with arrest if they minister to military during shutdown

 
Posted Friday, October 4th 2013 @ 4pm  by Alex Pappas


In a stunning development, some military priests are facing arrest if they celebrate mass or practice their faith on military bases during the federal government shutdown.

“With the government shutdown, many [government service] and contract priests who minister to Catholics on military bases worldwide are not permitted to work – not even to volunteer,” wrote John Schlageter, the general counsel for the Archdiocese for the Military Services USA, in an op-ed this week. “During the shutdown, it is illegal for them to minister on base and they risk being arrested if they attempt to do so.”

According to its website, the Archdiocese for the Military Services “provides the Catholic Church’s full range of pastoral ministries and spiritual services to those in the United States Armed Forces.”

Read more from The Daily Caller


Read more: http://www.kfiam640.com/articles/national-news-104668/priests-threatened-with-arrest-if-they-11712489/#ixzz2goRmaj6Y

Exactly...


muslimah
by on Oct. 4, 2013 at 11:23 PM
1 mom liked this

 This doesn't sound like it's legal. It sounds like a violation of constitutional  rights to me.

 Subhan Allah ( سبحان الله )"Glory be to Allah"
 Alhamdulillah ( الحمدللہ )"All Praise to Allah"
 Allahu Akbar ( الله اكبر )"Allah is the Greatest"

katy_kay08
by on Oct. 4, 2013 at 11:27 PM
1 mom liked this

*******Op-Ed******* 
Shutdown Impacts Chapel Services

By John Schlageter

             
                If the government shutdown continues through the weekend, there will be no Catholic priest to celebrate Mass this Sunday in the chapels at some U.S. military installations where non-active-duty priests serve as government contractors.   
 
                Military personnel enjoy, like all Americans, the First Amendment guarantee of the “Free Exercise” of their particular religious faith.  But because military personnel are considered a “captive audience,” the laws of our country require the government to provide access to that faith.  This is why we have a military chaplaincy.  This all becomes very clear when one thinks of a military family stationed in Bahrain or Japan.  They cannot walk down the street to the local synagogue, church, mosque, etc.
 
                There is a chronic shortage of active duty Catholic chaplains. While roughly 25% of the military is Catholic, Catholic priests make up only about 8% of the chaplain corps. That means approximately 275,000 men and women in uniform, and their families, are served by only 234 active-duty priests.  The temporary solution to this shortage is to provide GS and contract priests.   These men are employed by the government to ensure that a priest is available when an active duty Catholic Chaplain is not present.  With the government shutdown, many GS and contract priests who minister to Catholics on military bases worldwide are not permitted to work – not even to volunteer.  During the shutdown, it is illegal for them to minister on base and they risk being arrested if they attempt to do so.
 
                As an example, if a Catholic family has a Baptism scheduled this weekend at an Air Force base that is staffed by a GS or contract priest, unless they can locate a priest who is not a GS or contract priest, the Baptism is most likely cancelled.    If you are a Catholic stationed in Japan or Korea and are served by a Contract or GS priest, unless you speak Korean or Japanese and can find a church nearby, then you have no choice but to go without Mass this weekend.  Until the Federal Government resumes normal operations, or an exemption is granted to contract or GS priests, Catholic services are indefinitely suspended at many of those worldwide installations served by contract and GS priests.
 
                 At a time when the military is considering alternative sources of funding for sporting events at the service academies, no one seems to be looking for funding to ensure the Free Exercise rights of Catholics in uniform. Why not?
 
*John Schlageter is General Counsel for the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA.  
katy_kay08
by on Oct. 4, 2013 at 11:29 PM
2 moms liked this

I think the issue is more complex than the caller presents, but then I'm not surprised that the caller would misrepresent the issue.  They count on their readers not to look too closely at the issue.  

muslimah
by on Oct. 4, 2013 at 11:34 PM
2 moms liked this

 

Quoting katy_kay08:

 

*******Op-Ed******* 
Shutdown Impacts Chapel Services

By John Schlageter

             
                If the government shutdown continues through the weekend, there will be no Catholic priest to celebrate Mass this Sunday in the chapels at some U.S. military installations where non-active-duty priests serve as government contractors.   
 
                Military personnel enjoy, like all Americans, the First Amendment guarantee of the “Free Exercise” of their particular religious faith.  But because military personnel are considered a “captive audience,” the laws of our country require the government to provide access to that faith.  This is why we have a military chaplaincy.  This all becomes very clear when one thinks of a military family stationed in Bahrain or Japan.  They cannot walk down the street to the local synagogue, church, mosque, etc.
 
                There is a chronic shortage of active duty Catholic chaplains. While roughly 25% of the military is Catholic, Catholic priests make up only about 8% of the chaplain corps. That means approximately 275,000 men and women in uniform, and their families, are served by only 234 active-duty priests.  The temporary solution to this shortage is to provide GS and contract priests.   These men are employed by the government to ensure that a priest is available when an active duty Catholic Chaplain is not present.  With the government shutdown, many GS and contract priests who minister to Catholics on military bases worldwide are not permitted to work – not even to volunteer.  During the shutdown, it is illegal for them to minister on base and they risk being arrested if they attempt to do so.
 
                As an example, if a Catholic family has a Baptism scheduled this weekend at an Air Force base that is staffed by a GS or contract priest, unless they can locate a priest who is not a GS or contract priest, the Baptism is most likely cancelled.    If you are a Catholic stationed in Japan or Korea and are served by a Contract or GS priest, unless you speak Korean or Japanese and can find a church nearby, then you have no choice but to go without Mass this weekend.  Until the Federal Government resumes normal operations, or an exemption is granted to contract or GS priests, Catholic services are indefinitely suspended at many of those worldwide installations served by contract and GS priests.
 
                 At a time when the military is considering alternative sources of funding for sporting events at the service academies, no one seems to be looking for funding to ensure the Free Exercise rights of Catholics in uniform. Why not?
 
*John Schlageter is General Counsel for the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA.  

 So much for freedom of religion. I wonder how much longer until they take the rights away from the rest of us and what excuse they will use then.

Why does it only mention Catholics? Are Catholics the only ones loosing their "rights to religious freedom" over this or does this violation of rights include all religions?

 Subhan Allah ( سبحان الله )"Glory be to Allah"
 Alhamdulillah ( الحمدللہ )"All Praise to Allah"
 Allahu Akbar ( الله اكبر )"Allah is the Greatest"

katy_kay08
by on Oct. 4, 2013 at 11:37 PM


Quoting muslimah:

 

Quoting katy_kay08:


*******Op-Ed******* 
Shutdown Impacts Chapel Services

By John Schlageter

             
                If the government shutdown continues through the weekend, there will be no Catholic priest to celebrate Mass this Sunday in the chapels at some U.S. military installations where non-active-duty priests serve as government contractors.   
 
                Military personnel enjoy, like all Americans, the First Amendment guarantee of the “Free Exercise” of their particular religious faith.  But because military personnel are considered a “captive audience,” the laws of our country require the government to provide access to that faith.  This is why we have a military chaplaincy.  This all becomes very clear when one thinks of a military family stationed in Bahrain or Japan.  They cannot walk down the street to the local synagogue, church, mosque, etc.
 
                There is a chronic shortage of active duty Catholic chaplains. While roughly 25% of the military is Catholic, Catholic priests make up only about 8% of the chaplain corps. That means approximately 275,000 men and women in uniform, and their families, are served by only 234 active-duty priests.  The temporary solution to this shortage is to provide GS and contract priests.   These men are employed by the government to ensure that a priest is available when an active duty Catholic Chaplain is not present.  With the government shutdown, many GS and contract priests who minister to Catholics on military bases worldwide are not permitted to work – not even to volunteer.  During the shutdown, it is illegal for them to minister on base and they risk being arrested if they attempt to do so.
 
                As an example, if a Catholic family has a Baptism scheduled this weekend at an Air Force base that is staffed by a GS or contract priest, unless they can locate a priest who is not a GS or contract priest, the Baptism is most likely cancelled.    If you are a Catholic stationed in Japan or Korea and are served by a Contract or GS priest, unless you speak Korean or Japanese and can find a church nearby, then you have no choice but to go without Mass this weekend.  Until the Federal Government resumes normal operations, or an exemption is granted to contract or GS priests, Catholic services are indefinitely suspended at many of those worldwide installations served by contract and GS priests.
 
                 At a time when the military is considering alternative sources of funding for sporting events at the service academies, no one seems to be looking for funding to ensure the Free Exercise rights of Catholics in uniform. Why not?
 
*John Schlageter is General Counsel for the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA.  

 So much for freedom of religion. I wonder how much longer until they take the rights away from the rest of us and what excuse they will use then.

Why does it only mention Catholics? Are Catholics the only ones loosing their "rights to religious freedom" over this or does this violation of rights include all religions?

They are still free to practice their religion, and the soldiers are free to go off base to Mass.  Freedom of religion doesn't guarantee non American contractors access to military bases.  

It only mentions Catholics because its an op Ed piece on a catholic website.   I wouldn't expect a catholic website to concern themselves with other religions.  

muslimah
by on Oct. 4, 2013 at 11:40 PM
2 moms liked this

 

Quoting katy_kay08:


Quoting muslimah:

 

Quoting katy_kay08:

 

*******Op-Ed******* 
Shutdown Impacts Chapel Services

By John Schlageter

             
                If the government shutdown continues through the weekend, there will be no Catholic priest to celebrate Mass this Sunday in the chapels at some U.S. military installations where non-active-duty priests serve as government contractors.   
 
                Military personnel enjoy, like all Americans, the First Amendment guarantee of the “Free Exercise” of their particular religious faith.  But because military personnel are considered a “captive audience,” the laws of our country require the government to provide access to that faith.  This is why we have a military chaplaincy.  This all becomes very clear when one thinks of a military family stationed in Bahrain or Japan.  They cannot walk down the street to the local synagogue, church, mosque, etc.
 
                There is a chronic shortage of active duty Catholic chaplains. While roughly 25% of the military is Catholic, Catholic priests make up only about 8% of the chaplain corps. That means approximately 275,000 men and women in uniform, and their families, are served by only 234 active-duty priests.  The temporary solution to this shortage is to provide GS and contract priests.   These men are employed by the government to ensure that a priest is available when an active duty Catholic Chaplain is not present.  With the government shutdown, many GS and contract priests who minister to Catholics on military bases worldwide are not permitted to work – not even to volunteer.  During the shutdown, it is illegal for them to minister on base and they risk being arrested if they attempt to do so.
 
                As an example, if a Catholic family has a Baptism scheduled this weekend at an Air Force base that is staffed by a GS or contract priest, unless they can locate a priest who is not a GS or contract priest, the Baptism is most likely cancelled.    If you are a Catholic stationed in Japan or Korea and are served by a Contract or GS priest, unless you speak Korean or Japanese and can find a church nearby, then you have no choice but to go without Mass this weekend.  Until the Federal Government resumes normal operations, or an exemption is granted to contract or GS priests, Catholic services are indefinitely suspended at many of those worldwide installations served by contract and GS priests.
 
                 At a time when the military is considering alternative sources of funding for sporting events at the service academies, no one seems to be looking for funding to ensure the Free Exercise rights of Catholics in uniform. Why not?
 
*John Schlageter is General Counsel for the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA.  

 So much for freedom of religion. I wonder how much longer until they take the rights away from the rest of us and what excuse they will use then.

Why does it only mention Catholics? Are Catholics the only ones loosing their "rights to religious freedom" over this or does this violation of rights include all religions?

They are still free to practice their religion, and the soldiers are free to go off base to Mass.  Freedom of religion doesn't guarantee non American contractors access to military bases.  

It only mentions Catholics because its an op Ed piece on a catholic website.   

 Well i still don't like it and I find it very bothersome. I can turn my head the other way if they don't want to pay them but to tell them they can't volunteer is just wrong.

 Subhan Allah ( سبحان الله )"Glory be to Allah"
 Alhamdulillah ( الحمدللہ )"All Praise to Allah"
 Allahu Akbar ( الله اكبر )"Allah is the Greatest"

blondekosmic15
by on Oct. 4, 2013 at 11:42 PM

No Sunday Mass at Some Military Bases If Government Shutdown Continues

Archdiocese for Military Service's general counsel warns that priests who are under government contract to provide such services, but are not active-duty military chaplains, will not be "permitted to work – not even to volunteer during the shutdown."

http://www.ncregister.com/blog/joan-desmond/no-sunday-mass-at-quantico-if-government-shutdown-continues?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+NCRegisterDailyBlog+National+Catholic+Register

Do Catholic Priests in the Military ‘Risk Being Arrested’ if They Minister and Hold Mass During the Gov’t Shutdown?

In an op-ed published on Thursday, John Schlageter, general counsel at Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA, a group that oversees military the services provided by the Catholic Church in the U.S., made some startling claims about how the government shut-down could impact priests — and the allegations are chilling.

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/10/04/do-catholic-priests-in-the-military-risk-being-arrested-if-they-minister-and-hold-mass-during-the-govt-shutdown/

Priests Risk Arrest for Offering Sacraments to Catholic Troops During Shutdown

priest, arrest

(CNSNews.com) – Some Catholic priests under contract or GS (general schedule) to the military are not allowed to offer the Catholic sacaements--including saying Mass, consecrating marriages, or performing baptisms--on military property during the government shutdown, and if they do, even on a volunteer basis, they risk being arrested, according to the general counsel for the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA.

About 25% of the U.S. military is Catholic, some 275,000 service members, but there are only 234-active-duty priests. To fill the gap, contract or GS priests are brought in. But under the rules of the shutdown, many of those priests cannot perform their religious duties on military bases unless their contracts allow it.

“These men are employed by the government to ensure that a priest is available when an active duty Catholic Chaplain is not present,” said John Schlageter, general counsel for the archdiocese for the Military Services, USA. “With the government shutdown, many GS and contract priests who minister to Catholics on military bases worldwide are not permitted to work – not even to volunteer. “

“During the shutdown, it is illegal for them to minister on base and they risk being arrested if they attempt to do so,” said Schlageter.

He explained, for example, if a Catholic family has a baptism scheduled for this weekend on an Air Force base staffed by a GS or contract priest, that baptism “is most likely cancelled.” If you are stationed in Japan or Korea and served by a GS or contract priest, “then you have no choice but to go without Mass this weekend.”

“Until the federal government resumes normal operations, or an exemption is granted to contract or GS priests, Catholic services are indefinitely suspended at many of those worldwide installations served by contract and GS priests,” said Schlageter.

Steve Skojec with CatholicVote.org said, “This is outrageous. It is a violation of the First Amendment. It is a prohibition of the free exercise of religion to order priests under penalty of arrest that they cannot volunteer their time to offer Mass to the faithful on base. This cannot be allowed to stand.”

“Our government is out of control,” said Skojec.

CatholicVote.org posted further comments from John Schlageter and the Military Archdiocese, noting that, so far in Northern Virginia, “3 Masses have been cancelled at local Fort Belvoir.”

In addition, “In one situation a couple that is to be married at an Air Force Base this Saturday and did all of their preparation with a GS priest will now be married by an active duty priest who is being taken in from somewhere else,” said Schlageter. “This means that the priest that the couple got to know over the past few months will not be able to witness their marriage. One priest in Virginia Beach will be celebrating Mass in a local park off base.”

The general counsel also reported, “We are also learning that some chapel musicians will not be able to play at Sunday Mass during the furlough.”

He recommends that military personnel without a GS or contract priest now because of the shutdown to try to find a local chapel near their base.

Ashley McGuire, a senior fellow with The Catholic Association, said in a statement, "The idea that a priest would be arrested for or blocked from celebrating Mass for members of the military is something out of a totalitarian horror show. The government should do everything in its power to make sure that our servicemen and women are not punished with religious liberty violations during the government shutdown. This is yet another example of the Obama administration playing politics with our religious liberty."

According to its website, the Archdiocese for Military Services, USA "was created as an independent archdiocese by Pope John Paul II in 1985 as the only Catholic jurisdiction responsible for endorsing and granting faculties for priests to serve as chaplains in the U.S. military and VA Medical Centers."

http://cnsnews.com/news/article/michael-w-chapman/priests-risk-arrest-offering-sacraments-catholic-troops-during

TruthSeeker.
by Milami on Oct. 4, 2013 at 11:43 PM

 

Quoting katy_kay08:


Quoting muslimah:

 

Quoting katy_kay08:

 

*******Op-Ed******* 
Shutdown Impacts Chapel Services

By John Schlageter

             
                If the government shutdown continues through the weekend, there will be no Catholic priest to celebrate Mass this Sunday in the chapels at some U.S. military installations where non-active-duty priests serve as government contractors.   
 
                Military personnel enjoy, like all Americans, the First Amendment guarantee of the “Free Exercise” of their particular religious faith.  But because military personnel are considered a “captive audience,” the laws of our country require the government to provide access to that faith.  This is why we have a military chaplaincy.  This all becomes very clear when one thinks of a military family stationed in Bahrain or Japan.  They cannot walk down the street to the local synagogue, church, mosque, etc.
 
                There is a chronic shortage of active duty Catholic chaplains. While roughly 25% of the military is Catholic, Catholic priests make up only about 8% of the chaplain corps. That means approximately 275,000 men and women in uniform, and their families, are served by only 234 active-duty priests.  The temporary solution to this shortage is to provide GS and contract priests.   These men are employed by the government to ensure that a priest is available when an active duty Catholic Chaplain is not present.  With the government shutdown, many GS and contract priests who minister to Catholics on military bases worldwide are not permitted to work – not even to volunteer.  During the shutdown, it is illegal for them to minister on base and they risk being arrested if they attempt to do so.
 
                As an example, if a Catholic family has a Baptism scheduled this weekend at an Air Force base that is staffed by a GS or contract priest, unless they can locate a priest who is not a GS or contract priest, the Baptism is most likely cancelled.    If you are a Catholic stationed in Japan or Korea and are served by a Contract or GS priest, unless you speak Korean or Japanese and can find a church nearby, then you have no choice but to go without Mass this weekend.  Until the Federal Government resumes normal operations, or an exemption is granted to contract or GS priests, Catholic services are indefinitely suspended at many of those worldwide installations served by contract and GS priests.
 
                 At a time when the military is considering alternative sources of funding for sporting events at the service academies, no one seems to be looking for funding to ensure the Free Exercise rights of Catholics in uniform. Why not?
 
*John Schlageter is General Counsel for the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA.  

 So much for freedom of religion. I wonder how much longer until they take the rights away from the rest of us and what excuse they will use then.

Why does it only mention Catholics? Are Catholics the only ones loosing their "rights to religious freedom" over this or does this violation of rights include all religions?

They are still free to practice their religion, and the soldiers are free to go off base to Mass.  Freedom of religion doesn't guarantee non American contractors access to military bases.  

It only mentions Catholics because its an op Ed piece on a catholic website.   I wouldn't expect a catholic website to concern themselves with other religions.  

  Thanks for clearing that up. This makes sense. They can't be on the base. Not that they aren't free to minister, just not on base. There is nothing restricting the military from going off base to a Catholic service elsewhere.

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