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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

‘Nightmare’ bacteria are real, and the U.S. needs to act fast

Posted by on Oct. 23, 2013 at 12:24 AM
  • 41 Replies

(CNN) -- Hospitals need to take action against the spread of a deadly, antibiotic-resistant strain of bacteria, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The bacteria kill up to half of patients who are infected.

The bacteria, called carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae or CRE, have increased over the past decade and grown resistant to even the most powerful antibiotics, according to the CDC. In the first half of 2012, 200 health care facilities treated patients infected with CRE.

"CRE are nightmare bacteria," CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden said in a statement. "Our strongest antibiotics don't work and patients are left with potentially untreatable infections. Doctors, hospital leaders and public health must work together now to implement CDC's 'detect and protect' strategy and stop these infections from spreading."

That strategy includes making sure proper hand hygiene policies in health care facilities are actually followed.

Patients should also be screened for CREs, according to the CDC. Infected patients should be isolated, or grouped together to limit exposures.

Why 'nightmare bacteria' on the rise

The good news is that not only is CRE seen relatively infrequently in most U.S. facilities, but current surveillance systems haven't been able to find it commonly in otherwise healthy people in the community, says Dr. Alex Kallen, a CDC medical officer.

"Of course, if this were to (spread to the community), it would make it much more difficult to control," he said.

Each year, hospital-acquired infections sicken about 1.7 million and kill 99,000 people in the United States. While up to 50% of patients with CRE bloodstream infections die, similar antibiotic-susceptible bacteria kill about 20% of bloodstream-infected patients.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/nightmare-bacteria-are-real-and-the-us-needs-to-act-fast/2013/10/20/e457beec-3828-11e3-8a0e-4e2cf80831fc_story.html

http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2013/03/08/the-nightmare-bacteria-an-explainer/


by on Oct. 23, 2013 at 12:24 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Sisteract
by Whoopie on Oct. 23, 2013 at 12:31 AM
1 mom liked this

Drug resistant organisms are so hard to treat.

Mis and overuse of antibiotics have contributed to the increase in resistant organisms.

Goodwoman614
by Satan on Oct. 23, 2013 at 12:38 AM

We just watched a Frontline doc about this that aired on our local PBS.

Dd12 had heard a radio broadcast on it today - hushed me up to catch it all. She had just finished up a unit on genomes, genetics etc in science...

Scary scary stuff...

Bonnie_
by Bronze Member on Oct. 23, 2013 at 12:39 AM
2 moms liked this

I  never  took  my kids to thr Drs when they had colds  or flu.   I had friends  who  dragged  their  kids  to the Drs  for every  fever  and every sniffle  demanding  antibodies.  Their   kids  were always  so sickly because  their  own immune systems  didn't  get a chance to develope properly.

lga1965
by on Oct. 23, 2013 at 1:51 AM
1 mom liked this

 

well....

UpSheRises
by Platinum Member on Oct. 23, 2013 at 6:16 AM
2 moms liked this

Did anyone watch the Frontline documentary last night?

It was chilling.

UpSheRises
by Platinum Member on Oct. 23, 2013 at 6:18 AM
1 mom liked this

I had a girlfriend who took her son in once because "he just wasn't himself...too cranky" when he was about 8 months old. He too an antibiotic for 10 days just to be safe. WTF?


Quoting Bonnie_:

I  never  took  my kids to thr Drs when they had colds  or flu.   I had friends  who  dragged  their  kids  to the Drs  for every  fever  and every sniffle  demanding  antibodies.  Their   kids  were always  so sickly because  their  own immune systems  didn't  get a chance to develope properly.



Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Oct. 23, 2013 at 6:22 AM
Quoting Sisteract:

Drug resistant organisms are so hard to treat.

Mis and overuse of antibiotics have contributed to the increase in resistant organisms.

Hands up, anyone here who stopped taking a course of antibiotics part way through, because they felt better.


Josie_P
by on Oct. 23, 2013 at 6:24 AM
That is super scary.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
andiemomo3
by Andie on Oct. 23, 2013 at 6:29 AM
2 moms liked this

I don't remember the last time anyone in our house was on an antibiotic.  My MIL laid into me a few weeks ago because I wouldn't insist that my son be given an antibiotic for a mild sinus infection.  My exact words to her:  healthy people recover from these things without antibiotics.  You would have thought I was the devil himself.

actually - my dog is on antibiotics.  Strangely enough, he has this awful bacteria in his ears that was just eating them away.  All stemming from supposed allergies.  It's weird.

romalove
by Roma on Oct. 23, 2013 at 6:39 AM


Quoting Clairwil:

Quoting Sisteract:

Drug resistant organisms are so hard to treat.

Mis and overuse of antibiotics have contributed to the increase in resistant organisms.

Hands up, anyone here who stopped taking a course of antibiotics part way through, because they felt better.


Guiltily raises both hands.

Don't yell too loudly, please.

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