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Do you think candy-flavored cigars should be banned?

Posted by on Oct. 24, 2013 at 9:12 AM
  • 15 Replies

Your Kid Is Probably Smoking Candy-Flavored Cigars (Like, Right Now)

by Jacqueline Burt

cigar

Here's the thing about kids (and this goes for little ones all the way up through teens): If something tastes/smells/looks sorta kinda like candy, they're gonna want it. Simple as that. Even if that something is ... a cigar. Now, I know what you're thinking -- there's not enough sugary sweetness on the planet to mask the old man stench of a cigar (or maybe that's just what I'm thinking, as I've never been much of a fan). But a recent government study found that about 1 in 30 middle and high school kids smoke or have smoked small fruit- or candy-flavored cigars; according to the CDC, this number increases to nearly 1 in 12 for high school seniors. Sometimes a cigar isn't just a cigar, apparently.

Sadly, I can't say I'm particularly surprised by this study -- not as a former teen, anyway. I mean, remember wine coolers and those strawberry-flavored hangovers of doom?? As the mother of a seventh grader, however, I am rather dismayed. It's not that I'm particularly worried my daughter will start smoking -- the smell of cigarette smoke makes her gag, and I can't imagine the scent of vanilla (or whatever) flavored cigars won't do the same. This study, for me, just serves as one more reminder of how many harmful substances are available to kids and how easy it is to get hooked. Sure, cigars are illegal to sell to minors, but so is alcohol and so are cigarettes, and kids have always gotten their hands on those (and always will).

I don't know if tobacco companies truly are trying to entice underage smokers with products like these, but if they are? That's just diabolically messed up. (So, yes, they probably are doing this on purpose.) Maybe flavored cigars SHOULD be banned, as some suggest -- I truly can't imagine the average teen/tween experimenting with regular old grandpa-stinky cigars. Besides, the things must be absolutely vile! I can't imagine any adult smokers would actually miss candy-flavored cigars if they were pulled off the shelves.

Do you think candy-flavored cigars should be banned?

by on Oct. 24, 2013 at 9:12 AM
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Replies (1-10):
IandLoveandYou
by Bronze Member on Oct. 24, 2013 at 9:18 AM
I don't think so. I think the kid has to want to smoke, not just want to taste a swisher sweet.

I smoked cigarettes in high school. I tried different types of swishers, cloves (and I don't even have a sweet tooth!)... They tasted nice on the lips, but were gross and I couldn't get the idea or understand the point of not inhaling. Plus mouth cancer pictures helped to drive me away from cigars.

I don't think teens are as simple as "I want all things sweet, even gross cigars ahhh".

I think teens just try things because they are teens.



So no, I don't think they should be banned. You already have to be 18 to buy them, so whatever.
Aamy
by Silver Member on Oct. 24, 2013 at 9:19 AM

No.

Mrs.Kubalabuku
by Bronze Member on Oct. 24, 2013 at 9:24 AM

No, parents should teach their children right and wrong about the situation.  Stoers should actually card people buying their smokes and not let kids hang around outside begging adults to buy for them.  That's like saying we should ban anything adults do that feels/tastes good because then children might want to do it, too.

The fact is, MANY children and teens try UNFLAVORED tobacco products all the time.  

Children and Teens

Cigarette smoking during childhood and adolescence produces significant health problems among young people, including an increase in the number and severity of respiratory illnesses, decreased physical fitness and potential effects on the rate of lung growth and maximum lung function.1 

Most importantly, this is when an addiction to smoking takes hold which often persists into and sometimes throughout adulthood.  If current tobacco use patterns persist, an estimated 6.4 million current child smokers will eventually die prematurely from a smoking-related disease.2,3

Key Facts About Tobacco Use Among Children and Teenagers

  • Among adults who smoke, 68 percent began smoking regularly at age 18 or younger, and 85 percent started when they were 21 or younger.4 The average age of daily smoking initiation for new smokers in 2008 was 20.1 years among those 12-49 years old.5
  • Every day, almost 3,900 children under 18 years of age try their first cigarette, and more than 950 of them will become new, regular daily smokers.6 Half of them will ultimately die from their habit.7
  • People who begin smoking at an early age are more likely to develop a severe addiction to nicotine than those who start at a later age. Of adolescents who have smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetime, most of them report that they would like to quit, but are not able to do so.8

Prevalence of Tobacco Use Among Children and Teenagers

  • In 2007, 20 percent of high school students reported smoking in the last 30 days, down 45 percent from 36.4 percent in 1997 when rates peaked after increasing throughout the first half of the 1990s.9
  • Among high school students in 2007, the most prevalent forms of tobacco used were cigarettes (20 percent), cigars (13.6 percent), and smokeless tobacco (includes chewing tobacco and snuff; 7.9 percent).10   
  • The decline in smoking among high school girls has slowed recently.  Between 1999 and 2003, cigarette smoking prevalence among high school girls decreased by 37 percent. However, between 2003 and 2007, there was only a 15 percent decrease in prevalence of cigarette use.11 
  • In 2004, 11.7 percent of middle school students reported using any tobacco product; 8.4 percent used cigarettes. In 2004, 5.3 percent of middle school students were current cigar users, a decline of 30 percent since 1997.12
  • Since 1990 teenagers and young adults have had the highest rates of maternal smoking during pregnancy.  In 2005, 16.6 percent of female teens aged 15-19 and 18.6 percent of women aged 20-24 smoked during pregnancy.13
  • In 2007, 49.7 percent of current smokers in high school had tried to quit smoking cigarettes.14 In 2002, 55.4 percent of middle school students who smoked seriously tried to quit.15

Additional Facts About Tobacco Use Among Children and Teenagers

  • The 1998 Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) prohibited tobacco companies from advertising their products in ways that target youth. However, this has not accomplished its intended goal of curtailing tobacco exposure in children.16 Since the MSA, the average youth in the U.S. has been exposed to 559 tobacco ads.17 The impact of the MSA has been weakened as Big Tobacco switched the target of their marketing resources to young adults, seen as a primary role model by older teens.18 
  • Exposure to pro-tobacco marketing and media more than doubles the chances (2.2 times) of children and adolescents starting tobacco use.19
  • One study found that teens exposed to the greatest amount of smoking in movies were 2.6 times more likely to start smoking themselves compared with teens who watched the least amount of smoking in movies.20
tanyainmizzou
by on Oct. 24, 2013 at 9:51 AM

no


parent your kids for a change.

Woodbabe
by Woodie on Oct. 24, 2013 at 9:52 AM

Maybe we need stricter tobacco laws...

momtoscott
by Platinum Member on Oct. 24, 2013 at 9:52 AM

I don't think they should be banned, though they do sound truly vile.  I would bet they're aimed more at women than children, now that the chicks smoking cigars fad of the '90s has faded.  

pamelax3
by Gold Member on Oct. 24, 2013 at 10:49 AM

No they should not be banned, parents just need to inform their children and watch what they are doing

paganbaby
by Teflon Don on Oct. 24, 2013 at 11:00 AM

Pretty much this.

Quoting IandLoveandYou:

I don't think so. I think the kid has to want to smoke, not just want to taste a swisher sweet.

I smoked cigarettes in high school. I tried different types of swishers, cloves (and I don't even have a sweet tooth!)... They tasted nice on the lips, but were gross and I couldn't get the idea or understand the point of not inhaling. Plus mouth cancer pictures helped to drive me away from cigars.

I don't think teens are as simple as "I want all things sweet, even gross cigars ahhh".

I think teens just try things because they are teens.



So no, I don't think they should be banned. You already have to be 18 to buy them, so whatever.


Lilypie - Personal pictureLilypie Breastfeeding tickers

yourspecialkid
by Platinum Member on Oct. 24, 2013 at 11:42 AM

 No.  I don't need the government to raise my kids.

I haven't smelled a good cigar in years.  My Granddaddy used to smoke one every now and then.  I can't remember if it was actually the cigar smell that was so sweet or if it was that it was just Granddaddy and me doing something together.  I am pretty sure if I smelled one somewhere it would reduce me to tears.

 

Liastele
by Member on Oct. 24, 2013 at 11:44 AM

There is no reason to ban something simply because some people are lacking common sense. 

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