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Can you afford to eat fresh and local?

Posted by on Oct. 29, 2013 at 5:40 PM
  • 142 Replies

 As of today I've started advertising our turkeys for Thanksgiving. $60+  per turkey depending on the size. Free range, antibiotic free and fresh. I've sold a few. I've got a few comments about how people would like to have some but it's too expensive. Honestly, we'll be breaking even here. Turkeys eat a crap ton of food. Even free ranging them they eat a ton.

So I often hear people talk about wanting people to buy local and fresh, etc. etc. Could you afford it? These aren't even organic turkeys as I don't buy organic feed. Organic feed is 2x as expensive as regular feed so an organic turkey would be looking more like $120. Probably out of most budgets.

by on Oct. 29, 2013 at 5:40 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Mrs.Kubalabuku
by on Oct. 29, 2013 at 5:42 PM

Yes, and I've found that here it is even cheaper than the grocery stores.  However, DH and I also put a top priority on our food budget.

How many pounds do you think your turkerys are?  They can get quite pricey here.  To feed a family of 10 (having relatives over plus my own family unit) could easily top $60 but then you get that mass-produced flavorless turkey going, kwim?

furbabymum
by on Oct. 29, 2013 at 5:47 PM

 We have 3 different breeds. We do have the heritage breed, bourbon red, but I've found them to be almost too stupid to live. In fact they are so stupid we've lost 1/2 of them to suicide. They are the smaller, juicier birds who weren't bred to have huge breasts. We only have 4 now. They're about 10-15lbs processed. The others are much larger and will be around 15-20+lbs once processed. I was selling them at 4.50lb but had a few people say they could only do $60 so decided that I'd just do a flat 60 for the 10-15lb birds. We aren't even calculating our time invested here. We have to process them all and such. It's an undertaking! I don't know that we will ever do this again as there isn't really any profit in it.

We have one giant white turkey that is over 50lbs right now. MASSIVE bird. Estimated 40lbs once processed. Might have to lop him in half to fit him in the oven. I don't know how I'll manage to kill him. He's been named. lol

Quoting Mrs.Kubalabuku:

Yes, and I've found that here it is even cheaper than the grocery stores.  However, DH and I also put a top priority on our food budget.

How many pounds do you think your turkerys are?  They can get quite pricey here.  To feed a family of 10 (having relatives over plus my own family unit) could easily top $60 but then you get that mass-produced flavorless turkey going, kwim?

 

famiglia_bella
by on Oct. 29, 2013 at 5:55 PM
1 mom liked this

Yes, I think it works out even cheaper because we are filled up on real food, with substance and deep flavors, and not preservatives and fillers; it makes for less snacking.  It is a priority in our home and fairly easy since we live in an area with an abundance of farmers markets and even my local chain grocery store has a local, organic section.

Mrs.Kubalabuku
by on Oct. 29, 2013 at 6:13 PM


Uh oh!  That big turkey might just become a mascot!  LOL

Quoting furbabymum:

 We have 3 different breeds. We do have the heritage breed, bourbon red, but I've found them to be almost too stupid to live. In fact they are so stupid we've lost 1/2 of them to suicide. They are the smaller, juicier birds who weren't bred to have huge breasts. We only have 4 now. They're about 10-15lbs processed. The others are much larger and will be around 15-20+lbs once processed. I was selling them at 4.50lb but had a few people say they could only do $60 so decided that I'd just do a flat 60 for the 10-15lb birds. We aren't even calculating our time invested here. We have to process them all and such. It's an undertaking! I don't know that we will ever do this again as there isn't really any profit in it.

We have one giant white turkey that is over 50lbs right now. MASSIVE bird. Estimated 40lbs once processed. Might have to lop him in half to fit him in the oven. I don't know how I'll manage to kill him. He's been named. lol

Quoting Mrs.Kubalabuku:

Yes, and I've found that here it is even cheaper than the grocery stores.  However, DH and I also put a top priority on our food budget.

How many pounds do you think your turkerys are?  They can get quite pricey here.  To feed a family of 10 (having relatives over plus my own family unit) could easily top $60 but then you get that mass-produced flavorless turkey going, kwim?

 



krysstizzle
by on Oct. 29, 2013 at 6:17 PM

No. In fact, I have to be very careful about what I buy organic or local. I simply can't afford any local meat, even when we consider that we don't eat meat every day of the week. 

And I prioritize good food as much as I possibly can. But I have one income and three people to feed - and no child support - along with all bills. So it really is a juggling act. 

And I say this as someone whose job is local food systems. Seriously. 

Sisteract
by Whoopie on Oct. 29, 2013 at 6:21 PM

Can and do.

If not for the family, I'd never buy another turkey.

furbabymum
by on Oct. 29, 2013 at 6:23 PM

 I feel ya. We are raising this meat and it's still far more expensive than anything we could buy at the store. The only exception being beef. We went 1/2 in on a cow with our inlaws. 2 cows, 70 acres, 2 years. Our total financial cost was $300 for that half cow. When you factor in the time though..... They were fed totally off all our land combined.

Every time my DH eats an egg (we have chickens) he says, mmmmmm $10. lol

Quoting krysstizzle:

No. In fact, I have to be very careful about what I buy organic or local. I simply can't afford any local meat, even when we consider that we don't eat meat every day of the week. 

And I prioritize good food as much as I possibly can. But I have one income and three people to feed - and no child support - along with all bills. So it really is a juggling act. 

And I say this as someone whose job is local food systems. Seriously. 

 

furbabymum
by on Oct. 29, 2013 at 6:24 PM

 I wasn't aware at the time but giant white are too big to live. Once he gets to a certain size he'll have a heart attack and die. So he's going to be killed. Hopefully we'll get to him before his heart goes out.

Quoting Mrs.Kubalabuku:

 

Uh oh!  That big turkey might just become a mascot!  LOL

Quoting furbabymum:

 We have 3 different breeds. We do have the heritage breed, bourbon red, but I've found them to be almost too stupid to live. In fact they are so stupid we've lost 1/2 of them to suicide. They are the smaller, juicier birds who weren't bred to have huge breasts. We only have 4 now. They're about 10-15lbs processed. The others are much larger and will be around 15-20+lbs once processed. I was selling them at 4.50lb but had a few people say they could only do $60 so decided that I'd just do a flat 60 for the 10-15lb birds. We aren't even calculating our time invested here. We have to process them all and such. It's an undertaking! I don't know that we will ever do this again as there isn't really any profit in it.

We have one giant white turkey that is over 50lbs right now. MASSIVE bird. Estimated 40lbs once processed. Might have to lop him in half to fit him in the oven. I don't know how I'll manage to kill him. He's been named. lol

Quoting Mrs.Kubalabuku:

Yes, and I've found that here it is even cheaper than the grocery stores.  However, DH and I also put a top priority on our food budget.

How many pounds do you think your turkerys are?  They can get quite pricey here.  To feed a family of 10 (having relatives over plus my own family unit) could easily top $60 but then you get that mass-produced flavorless turkey going, kwim?

 

 

 

 

Mrs.Kubalabuku
by on Oct. 29, 2013 at 6:34 PM

Poor poor turkey!  Are giant whites delicious, though?


Quoting furbabymum:

 I wasn't aware at the time but giant white are too big to live. Once he gets to a certain size he'll have a heart attack and die. So he's going to be killed. Hopefully we'll get to him before his heart goes out.

Quoting Mrs.Kubalabuku:


Uh oh!  That big turkey might just become a mascot!  LOL

Quoting furbabymum:

 We have 3 different breeds. We do have the heritage breed, bourbon red, but I've found them to be almost too stupid to live. In fact they are so stupid we've lost 1/2 of them to suicide. They are the smaller, juicier birds who weren't bred to have huge breasts. We only have 4 now. They're about 10-15lbs processed. The others are much larger and will be around 15-20+lbs once processed. I was selling them at 4.50lb but had a few people say they could only do $60 so decided that I'd just do a flat 60 for the 10-15lb birds. We aren't even calculating our time invested here. We have to process them all and such. It's an undertaking! I don't know that we will ever do this again as there isn't really any profit in it.

We have one giant white turkey that is over 50lbs right now. MASSIVE bird. Estimated 40lbs once processed. Might have to lop him in half to fit him in the oven. I don't know how I'll manage to kill him. He's been named. lol

Quoting Mrs.Kubalabuku:

Yes, and I've found that here it is even cheaper than the grocery stores.  However, DH and I also put a top priority on our food budget.

How many pounds do you think your turkerys are?  They can get quite pricey here.  To feed a family of 10 (having relatives over plus my own family unit) could easily top $60 but then you get that mass-produced flavorless turkey going, kwim?

 



 



krysstizzle
by on Oct. 29, 2013 at 6:38 PM
1 mom liked this

Beef can be done, but it requires a big chunk of change all at once (which isn't possible for a lot of people). I haven't gotten half a beef the last 3 years, but I do sometimes do that with my grandparents. It really does end up being at least a bit cheaper than buying at the store, and the quality...welll, there's just no comparison!

I'm actually really lucky and we eat pretty clean and well, but that's because I work for a non-profit that has a farm; I often get stuff from there for free. We also work with farmers markets and most of the vendors know me, so I get either discounts or free produce from them. Because of that, I'm able to switch to organic eggs and milk - eggs are local, milk is not. And we use a lot of both because I bake a lot, plus my boys eat like they'll never see food again :/ 

It's a juggling act. The dream is to eventually buy a place with a couple of acres for food production. Of course, I'd like to change the entire system. It shouldn't be so hard to eat whole, good food and so easy and expected to eat junk. Our food system is ridiculous, I'm determined to change that. ;)

Quoting furbabymum:

 I feel ya. We are raising this meat and it's still far more expensive than anything we could buy at the store. The only exception being beef. We went 1/2 in on a cow with our inlaws. 2 cows, 70 acres, 2 years. Our total financial cost was $300 for that half cow. When you factor in the time though..... They were fed totally off all our land combined.

Every time my DH eats an egg (we have chickens) he says, mmmmmm $10. lol

Quoting krysstizzle:

No. In fact, I have to be very careful about what I buy organic or local. I simply can't afford any local meat, even when we consider that we don't eat meat every day of the week. 

And I prioritize good food as much as I possibly can. But I have one income and three people to feed - and no child support - along with all bills. So it really is a juggling act. 

And I say this as someone whose job is local food systems. Seriously. 

 


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