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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Wisconsin Sisters Claim Gardasil Causes Early Menopause and Infertility in Lawsuit

Posted by on Nov. 8, 2013 at 7:39 AM
  • 49 Replies

Wisconsin sisters say HPV vaccine caused ovaries to stop producing eggs

Madelyne Meylor, 20, and Olivia Meylor, 19, have filed a federal claim, saying they believe the Gardasil vaccine caused their condition. The Meylors say they have had premature menopause, marked by insomnia, night sweats and headaches, and most likely won't be able to get pregnant.

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TUESDAY, NOV. 5, 2013 PHOTO

AMBER ARNOLD/AP

Madelyne Meylor, 20 (left), and her sister Olivia, 19, at their home in Mount Horeb, Wis. The sisters have filed a federal claim, saying they believe a cervical cancer vaccine, Gardasil, caused their ovaries to stop producing eggs.

MADISON, Wis. — Two Wisconsin sisters have filed a federal claim, saying they believe a cervical cancer vaccine caused their ovaries to stop producing eggs.

Madelyne Meylor, 20, and Olivia Meylor, 19, both of Mount Horeb, claim their condition came from the Gardasil vaccine for the human papillomavirus, or HPV, according to the Wisconsin State Journal.

RELATED: ONE DOSE OF HPV VACCINE MAY PREVENT CERVICAL CANCER

The vaccine's maker, Merck and Co., says evidence doesn't support a relationship between the sisters' condition and the vaccine.

EMILE WAMSTEKER/BLOOMBERG

The vaccine's maker, Merck and Co., says evidence doesn't support a relationship between the sisters' condition and the vaccine.

Their attorney, Mark Krueger, told the newspaper it is the first allegation of its kind to reach a hearing through the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, a special court established to evaluate claims of harm from vaccines.

In a statement, the vaccine's maker, Merck and Co., says evidence doesn't support a relationship between the condition and vaccine. The Centers for Disease Control and the Food and Drug Administration say the vaccine is safe and can help prevent many of the 18,000 cancers in women and 8,000 cancers in men caused by HPV each year.

RELATED: HPV INFECTIONS ON THE DECLINE SINCE VACCINE: CDC OFFICIALS

Health officials recommend three doses of the vaccine against HPV, or the human papillomavirus, for girls and boys ages 11 and 12 to protect against certain cancers and conditions.

HARRY CABLUCK/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Health officials recommend three doses of the vaccine against HPV, or the human papillomavirus, for girls and boys ages 11 and 12 to protect against certain cancers and conditions.

Health officials recommend three doses of the vaccine against HPV, a sexually transmitted virus, for girls and boys ages 11 and 12 to protect against cervical cancer, throat cancer, genital warts and other conditions. Two brands are available: Gardasil, approved in 2006, and Cervarix, approved in 2009.

The vaccine injury program has awarded payments for HPV vaccine injuries in 68 cases for a total of at least $5.9 million, according to the federal government and Judicial Watch, a nonpartisan foundation. The program has dismissed 63 claims, and 81 are pending.

RELATED: ORAL CANCERS FROM HPV 'EPIDEMIC' AMONG MEN, BUT PREVENTABLE

The Centers for Disease Control and the Food and Drug Administration say the vaccine is safe, and can help prevent many of the 18,000 cancers in women and 8,000 cancers in men caused by HPV each year.

CHARLES REX ARBOGAST/ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Centers for Disease Control and the Food and Drug Administration say the vaccine is safe, and can help prevent many of the 18,000 cancers in women and 8,000 cancers in men caused by HPV each year.

The Meylors told the newspaper that they believe Gardasil shots caused their ovaries to stop producing eggs. They also have premature menopause, marked by insomnia, night sweats and headaches, and almost certainly won't be able to get pregnant, they said.

"I've always wanted a huge family, but I don't know if that will be possible," Madelyne Meylor said.

RELATED: VACCINE SHOWS HOPE FOR WOMEN WITH HPV

Tests for three possible genetic causes of the condition were negative for both women, the newspaper reported. They are taking birth control pills or using patches as hormone replacement therapy.

The case is scheduled for a hearing Thursday and Friday in Washington, D.C.



Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/sisters-gardasil-made-ovaries-stop-producing-eggs-article-1.1510514#ixzz2k3bgLxob

by on Nov. 8, 2013 at 7:39 AM
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Woodbabe
by Woodie on Nov. 8, 2013 at 8:39 AM
2 moms liked this

Does anyone else notice that this article spends more space and time extolling how 'safe' this vaccine is vs. these girl's medical issues? Its not like they just decided to sue, they've gone through testing and are under a doctor's care. Something is wrong and its pinpointed in this vaccine's direction. The article itself seems to 'poo poo' their issues and claim.

ReadWriteLuv
by Silver Member on Nov. 8, 2013 at 8:41 AM
3 moms liked this

It kind of seems to take the Merck says there is no evidence to support this claim, so it's ok, kind of standpoint. 

Yes, cases of new HPV diagnosis have decreased over the last few years, but at what cost to our daughters?

Quoting Woodbabe:

Does anyone else notice that this article spends more space and time extolling how 'safe' this vaccine is vs. these girl's medical issues? Its not like they just decided to sue, they've gone through testing and are under a doctor's care. Something is wrong and its pinpointed in this vaccine's direction. The article itself seems to 'poo poo' their issues and claim.


Lottie925
by Bronze Member on Nov. 8, 2013 at 8:41 AM
2 moms liked this

Way too many reports of side effects of this vaccine.

I wouldnt give it to my DD and I do follow most vaccination recommendations.

EireLass
by Ruby Member on Nov. 8, 2013 at 8:50 AM
I wonder how old they were when they got it? Maybe they should sue their parents.
Bookwormy
by Platinum Member on Nov. 8, 2013 at 8:56 AM
2 moms liked this
if this were being claimed by several unrelated women I would have many more concerns about Gardasil. However since this claim is being made by women that are related to each other I don't think this is about the vaccine.
LauraKW
by "Dude!" on Nov. 8, 2013 at 9:14 AM
4 moms liked this
There were no facts presented here other than the girls were vaccinated, they are suing, and Merck says there is no evidence to support their claim. What is their "condition" and how are they linking it back to Gardasil? What medical or scientific data do they have?
Koltie6
by Bronze Member on Nov. 8, 2013 at 9:27 AM
I thiught they already took it off the market. I wouldn't give it to my dog. Hope they get a million dollars .
meriana
by Platinum Member on Nov. 8, 2013 at 9:33 AM
1 mom liked this

Quoting ReadWriteLuv:

It kind of seems to take the Merck says there is no evidence to support this claim, so it's ok, kind of standpoint. 

Yes, cases of new HPV diagnosis have decreased over the last few years, but at what cost to our daughters?

Quoting Woodbabe:

Does anyone else notice that this article spends more space and time extolling how 'safe' this vaccine is vs. these girl's medical issues? Its not like they just decided to sue, they've gone through testing and are under a doctor's care. Something is wrong and its pinpointed in this vaccine's direction. The article itself seems to 'poo poo' their issues and claim.



Doesn't surprise me at all. The Gov has already awarded over 5 million in compensation in 68 cases of injury from the vaccine and 81 are pending according to the article. Then there is the fact that often vaccine injuries are not reported and rarely publicized so the true number of cases and how often people are injured from them just isn't known. Of course Merck and the CDC are going to say there's no evidence their condition was cause by the vaccine. That is their standard position, vaccines are safe, there's no evidence, correlation doesn't equal causation, etc. etc. No matter what happens to a person, even if it occurs immediately after receiving a vaccine, the pharma companies and the CDC maintain that it couldn't possibly be vaccine related, whatever happened to that person would have happened anyway. Vaccines are always given a pass by the pharma companies and the CDC which is what keeps them from truly being looked at as even a possible cause of injury, researched/tested further and actually made safe. As for those that are injured, they just don't really matter.
ReadWriteLuv
by Silver Member on Nov. 8, 2013 at 9:38 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting meriana:


Quoting ReadWriteLuv:

It kind of seems to take the Merck says there is no evidence to support this claim, so it's ok, kind of standpoint. 

Yes, cases of new HPV diagnosis have decreased over the last few years, but at what cost to our daughters?

Quoting Woodbabe:

Does anyone else notice that this article spends more space and time extolling how 'safe' this vaccine is vs. these girl's medical issues? Its not like they just decided to sue, they've gone through testing and are under a doctor's care. Something is wrong and its pinpointed in this vaccine's direction. The article itself seems to 'poo poo' their issues and claim.



Doesn't surprise me at all. The Gov has already awarded over 5 million in compensation in 68 cases of injury from the vaccine and 81 are pending according to the article. Then there is the fact that often vaccine injuries are not reported and rarely publicized so the true number of cases and how often people are injured from them just isn't known. Of course Merck and the CDC are going to say there's no evidence their condition was cause by the vaccine. That is their standard position, vaccines are safe, there's no evidence, correlation doesn't equal causation, etc. etc. No matter what happens to a person, even if it occurs immediately after receiving a vaccine, the pharma companies and the CDC maintain that it couldn't possibly be vaccine related, whatever happened to that person would have happened anyway. Vaccines are always given a pass by the pharma companies and the CDC which is what keeps them from truly being looked at as even a possible cause of injury, researched/tested further and actually made safe. As for those that are injured, they just don't really matter.

I hate big pharm. :-(

On an only slightly related, and nowhere near as serious of a note, I feel this same way about birth control. I got the Mirena IUD a couple of years ago, and swelled up like a balloon. We're talking 15-20 pounds in three months, with no change at all in lifestyle or eating habits. That 15-20 pounds absolutely would not budge for anything either. I went back to my doctor to complain and she swore up and down it wasn't the Mirena, and that the label doesn't document weight gain as a possible side effect. She said it was all me. Funny, how after I made her remove it 2 months after that discussion, the weight magically disappeared. 

Woodbabe
by Woodie on Nov. 8, 2013 at 9:47 AM

Their attorney, Mark Krueger, told the newspaper it is the first allegation of its kind to reach a hearing through the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, a special court established to evaluate claims of harm from vaccines.

There must have been enough compelling evidence for it to even reach this far...its qualified for a hearing on it so there's "something" to it. 

Quoting Bookwormy:

if this were being claimed by several unrelated women I would have many more concerns about Gardasil. However since this claim is being made by women that are related to each other I don't think this is about the vaccine.


 Sexy If its unladylike, fattening or fun, I'm in!
  

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