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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Forget The 50 States, U.S. Is Really 11 Nations

Posted by on Nov. 11, 2013 at 6:17 PM
  • 79 Replies

Forget The 50 States, U.S. Is Really 11 Nations, Says Author

8 min 1 sec



Colin Woodard's map of the "11 nations."

Colin Woodard's map of the "11 nations."

Colin Woodard

For hundreds of years, this nation has been known as the United States of America. But according to author and journalist Colin Woodard, the country is neither united, nor made up of 50 states. Woodward has studied American voting patterns, demographics and public opinion polls going back to the days of the first settlers, and says that his research shows America is really made up of 11 different nations.

"Yankeedom" in the Northeast and industrial Midwest was founded by Puritans and residents there have always been comfortable with a government that regulates and moderates. The communities of the Deep South in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and other states were founded by former West Indian plantation owners who wanted to recreate the society they were used to: government based on the sacrosanct rights of a few wealthy elite. "Greater Appalachia," extending from West Virginia in a wide band to the northern half of Texas, was settled by people from Northern Ireland, England and Scotland. Those people were openly antagonistic to the so-called "ruling oligarchies" and upper classes, so they opposed the slave plantation economy, but they also distrust government.

Woodard says that while individual residents will have their own opinions, each region has become more segregated by ideology in recent years. In fact, he says the mobility of American citizens has increased this partisan isolation as people tend to self-segregate into like-minded communities.

"This isn't about individual behavior, it's about the characteristics of the dominant cultures of these various regions. And you can, as an individual, like or hate the sort of surrounding assumptions where you live," Woodard says. "But that force that you feel that's there, and those sort of assumptions and givens about politics, and culture, and different social relationships — that's the forces of dominant culture that go back to the early colonial period, and the differences between various colonial clusters and their founders."

National Woman's Party


by on Nov. 11, 2013 at 6:17 PM
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Replies (1-10):
KhloesMom2009
by on Nov. 11, 2013 at 6:24 PM

I'm fascinated by his interpretations. I don't know enough about the people who settled in all of these regions to applaud and/or admonish his "data".

LucyMom08
by Gold Member on Nov. 11, 2013 at 6:27 PM
1 mom liked this
Must be my Irish and Scottish blood that's balked at my upbringing in the deep south ;)

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Erinelizz
by Bronze Member on Nov. 11, 2013 at 6:28 PM
2 moms liked this
I just read a much longer article about this, which went into great detail about each "nation" and its peoples backgrounds and beliefs. Very eye opening, and it definitely helps explain the political divide in this country.

ETA:
http://www.tufts.edu/alumni/magazine/fall2013/features/up-in-arms.html

Here's a link to the more detailed article, if anyone is interested. (I'm on mobile, can't make it clicky)
heresjohnny
by Bronze Member on Nov. 11, 2013 at 11:34 PM

Woodard says that while individual residents will have their own opinions, each region has become more segregated by ideology in recent years. In fact, he says the mobility of American citizens has increased this partisan isolation as people tend to self-segregate into like-minded communities.

^^^^ I 100% agree with this statement. DH is in the military and we've lived in several different states. We recently bought a house where we're currently stationed because it feels the most like home. Everywhere we moved we felt like outsiders, but this place is full of people who think and talk like us. In fact, it's almost pointless to vote because most of the time the election results go the way we want them to, lol.

turtle68
by Mahinaarangi on Nov. 12, 2013 at 12:07 AM

Which is why I believe America will go the way of Europe and Russia...break off and become individual countries.

Bookwormy
by Platinum Member on Nov. 12, 2013 at 3:12 AM
I heard him on the radio today!
lovemymini
by Bronze Member on Nov. 12, 2013 at 3:15 AM
2 moms liked this
Kinda surprised they didn't say Texas was its own nation.
Donna6503
by Platinum Member on Nov. 12, 2013 at 3:26 AM
The Rockies are a bit different than the other Far West states and areas.
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smalltownmom03
by Member on Nov. 12, 2013 at 3:35 AM
Can someone make this clicky please?


Quoting Erinelizz:

I just read a much longer article about this, which went into great detail about each "nation" and its peoples backgrounds and beliefs. Very eye opening, and it definitely helps explain the political divide in this country.



ETA:

http://www.tufts.edu/alumni/magazine/fall2013/features/up-in-arms.html



Here's a link to the more detailed article, if anyone is interested. (I'm on mobile, can't make it clicky)

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Nov. 12, 2013 at 4:41 AM


Quoting smalltownmom03:

Can someone make this clicky please?

http://www.tufts.edu/alumni/magazine/fall2013/features/up-in-arms.html


How well does Utah fit into this?

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