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Conservative Kansas Group Suing to Remove Science from Schools, Claims Science is Unconstitutional

Posted by on Nov. 21, 2013 at 6:20 PM
  • 36 Replies
1 mom liked this

Conservative Kansas Group Suing to Remove Science from Schools, Claims Science is Unconstitutional

dunce

In one of the dumbest things I’ve possibly ever read, there’s apparently a conservative group in Kansas that’s suing to remove science from the classroom on the grounds that it violates separation of church and state.

What kind of asinine reasoning is behind this push?  Well, it’s quite simple—and completely idiotic.  This group claims that evolution is a religion and teaching it violates the separation of church and state.

Yes, you’ve read that correctly.  A religious group is claiming that evolution is a religion and therefore it shouldn’t be taught in schools.

According to the AP:

Citizens for Objective Public Education (COPE) claims that public schools “promote a ‘non-theistic religious worldview’ by allowing only ‘materialistic’ or ‘atheistic’ explanations to scientific questions.”  The group argues that by teaching evolution “the state would be ‘indoctrinating’ impressionable students in violation of the First Amendment.”

And apparently they’re dead serious.

When I first read about this, I thought for sure it was some kind of article from The Onion or some other satire-based website.  But sadly, it’s a real story.

Now I’m a Christian, but to know that there are people who view science equally as proven as their religion is absolutely terrifying.  And these people are raising children—a truly sobering thought.  To think that there are parents so delusional that they would view evolution, something believed by probably 99.99% of the world’s scientists, similar to faith (faith being something that doesn’t rely on evidence) is astounding.

Basically this group is arguing that any kind of action taken that isn’t based on religious principles is a direct rejection of religion.

But apparently this isn’t the first time this kind of lawsuit has been attempted, and luckily history shows it’s been laughed out of court just as it should be.

Because while I’m a Christian who isn’t ashamed of his faith, I’m not dense enough to dismiss proven science.  Faith as a term is actually the opposite of evidence.  Faith is believing in something even though there’s little to no evidence to support its system of beliefs.  Science has rules behind it that scientists must follow for their theories or findings to be taken with any sense of validity behind them.

I can’t help but feel sorry for the children being raised by parents such as these.  To raise your child (or children) to reject proven science in favor of faith is the ultimate embrace of ignorance, and it’s setting them up for a life built on misinformation and delusion.  What a damn shame.

by on Nov. 21, 2013 at 6:20 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Peanutx3
by on Nov. 21, 2013 at 6:20 PM
Sigh
JakeandEmmasMom
by Platinum Member on Nov. 21, 2013 at 6:43 PM
Wow.
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beesbad
by Bronze Member on Nov. 21, 2013 at 6:45 PM

Unbelievable. 

sweet-a-kins
by Emerald Member on Nov. 21, 2013 at 7:21 PM
4 moms liked this
The goal of these groups is to keep people uneducated so they can bilk them and have lifelong dedicated CUSTOMERS
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LiveinJoy
by Namaste on Nov. 21, 2013 at 7:26 PM

It won't fly.

http://www.copeinc.org/docs/press-legal-complaint.pdf

just in case some one wants to read the complaint

LiveinJoy
by Namaste on Nov. 21, 2013 at 7:30 PM

Anti-Evolution Group Files Lawsuit Against Kansas Education Board Over New Science Standards

The Huffington Post  |  By Posted:   |  Updated: 09/29/2013 1:22 pm EDT

An anti-evolution group is suing the Kansas State Board of Education for instituting a science curriculum that teaches evolution.

The nonprofit Citizens for Objective Public Education filed a lawsuit Thursday to block the board, education commissioner and Department of Education from teaching science classes consistent with new educational benchmarks developed by 26 states to align school systems across the U.S. These Next Generation Science Standards, which Kansas adopted in June, have seen fierce opposition from critics opposed to the teaching of climate change and evolution.

Citizens for Objective Public Education argues in its lawsuit that the standards promote atheism and therefore violate the separation of church and state.

“The state’s job is simply to say to students, ‘How life arises continues to be a scientific mystery and there are competing ideas about it,’” said John Calvert, an attorney involved in the lawsuit, per The Associated Press. Calvert is also the founder of the Intelligent Design Network, a group that "seeks institutional objectivity in origins science," according to its website.

The Citizens lawsuit alleges that the Next Generation Science Standards "seek to cause students to embrace a non-theistic Worldview ... by leading very young children to ask ultimate questions about the cause and nature of life and the universe ... and then using a variety of deceptive devices and methods that will lead them to answer the questions with only materialistic/atheistic explanations.”

Education advocates at the Baptist Joint Committee For Religious Freedom have condemned the suit.

“Every time the public school science curriculum properly refuses to teach creationism, it is guilty of teaching a religious world view? That makes no sense,” reads a blog post on the Committee's website.

The Kansas education board this summer voted to adopt the Next Generation Science Standards by an 8 – 2 margin, despite the state's history of anti-evolution sentiment. It was a decisive move away from the board's 2005 decision to approve standards that took a skeptical view of Darwinism.

The Next Generation Science Standards have also been adopted by several other states including Rhode Island and Delaware.

nixore
by Myk Elskling on Nov. 21, 2013 at 8:06 PM
2 moms liked this

"These include systematic omissions and misrepresentations, teaching 

the materialistic/atheistic ideas to primary school children whose minds are susceptible to blindly 

accepting them as true, programs designed to cause the views to become habits of mind..."

Darn science.  Telling people to blindly accept things as true.   

Quoting LiveinJoy:

It won't fly.

http://www.copeinc.org/docs/press-legal-complaint.pdf

just in case some one wants to read the complaint


Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Nov. 22, 2013 at 6:10 AM

BUMP!

romalove
by Roma on Nov. 22, 2013 at 6:20 AM
5 moms liked this

It's an interesting read, the complaint.  I've come across a similar line of reasoning in discussions in the forum, which essentially goes like this:  if there is religion there must be an opposite to religion, which is then anti-religion and religious in and of itself.

There is a huge fallacy in the complaint, which says that "only" materialistic/non-theistic answers are permitted in science.  That is completely untrue.  Science is evidence based.  If there was evidence of theistic answers, science would pursue them as they pursue all other evidences, looking where they lead.  

That there hasn't been empirical evidence that has led science in that direction doesn't mean science wouldn't follow such things if they existed.

But religion can't have it both ways, it can't be that belief is based on faith without such empirical evidence, and that science, which is completely evidence based, must embrace religion.

Interesting mental gymnastics, but an ultimate fail.

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