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Spin Off: Homeschooling around the world

Posted by on Nov. 29, 2013 at 4:43 PM
  • 53 Replies
1 mom liked this

Europe[edit]

Country Status Statistics Sources
Albania Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1 2
Andorra Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1 2
Armenia Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1 2
Austria Legal under restrictive conditions, homeschooling is allowed as long as the instruction is at least equal to that of the state school. 2100 1 2 3
Azerbaijan Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1 2
Belarus Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1 2
Belgium Legal under restrictive conditions, Homeschooling is a constitutional right in Belgium. 500 2 3
Bosnia and Herz. Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1 2
Bulgaria Illegal, public education is mandatory. Only children with special needs may be homeschooled under strict government control. fewer than 100 families 1 2 3
Croatia Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1 2
Cyprus Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1
Czech Republic Legal under restrictive conditions by temporary experimental law for children aged 5–12. Law currently under negotiation with homeschoolers. Unknown 1 23 4
Denmark Legal as alternative to the mandatory public school system. 1% of students 1 2 3
Estonia Legal under restrictive conditions, only allowed for exceptional cases. Unknown 1 2
Finland Legal as alternative to the mandatory public school system. Written and oral examinations to check on progress are mandatory. 400–600 1 2 3 4
France Legal as alternative to the mandatory public school system. Inspections are mandatory every year. 5 063 1
Georgia Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1 2
Germany Illegal, public or approved private education is mandatory with the only exception being where continued school attendance would create undue hardship for an individual child. 400 123
Greece Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1
Hungary Legal under restrictive conditions. Every homeschooled child must be supervised by an authorized school and pass annual exams. Homeschooled children received diplomas from supervising school. 7400 Children (2008) 1 2 3 4
Iceland Legal only for holders of teaching certificates, in other cases public education is mandatory. Unknown 1
Ireland Legal, homeschooling is allowed by the constitution. Unknown 1
Italy Legal, homeschooling is allowed by the constitution. Unknown 1
Kazakhstan Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1
Latvia Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1 2
Liechtenstein Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1 2
Lithuania Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1 2
Luxembourg Legal, for primary school age. Unknown 1 2
Macedonia Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1 2
Malta Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1 2 3
Moldova Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1
Montenegro Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1
Netherlands Legal under restrictive conditions, only legal for parents who cannot find a school fitting their beliefs in the area. Around 300 children exempt* 2
Norway Legal 400+ 12
Poland Legal under restrictive conditions. Every homeschooled child must be supervised by an authorized school (can be a private school) and pass annual exams. Homeschooled children received diplomas from supervising school. Unknown 1 23
Portugal Legal.[citation needed] Unknown 1
Romania Legal under restrictive conditions. Children with disabilities, special needs or whose condition does not allow them to be physically present in a school may be home-schooled, under the supervision of an accredited teacher. Unknown 1

2 3 4 5

Russia Legal since 1992, law sometimes ignored and not made legal. Unknown 1 2
San Marino Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1
Serbia Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Unknown 1
Slovakia Illegal, public education is mandatory without known exceptions. Virtually no homeschooling* 1
Slovenia Legal. Unknown 1
Spain Neither legal nor illegal, as Constitution recognises freedom of education, but national education law stipulates that compulsive education must be met through school attendance. About 2,000 families 1 2 3
Sweden Illegal, as of June 2010; supposedly allowed under special circumstances such as student health reasons or family travel, but virtually never approved. Officials often ignore legally permitted appeals. 200 families—half legally 1

2 3 2 4 5 6 7

Switzerland Legal in about three quarters of the cantons, with many being restrictive to very restrictive. 200–500 children 1 2
Ukraine Legal and expressly allowed for in Articles 59 and 60 of Ukraine’s Education Law. 100 families 1 [9]
United Kingdom Legal as alternative to the mandatory public school system. 20,000–100,000 1 2
Vatican City No indication for educational laws to exist were found

 

For more homeschooling stats around the world: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeschooling_international_status_and_statistics

by on Nov. 29, 2013 at 4:43 PM
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Replies (1-10):
rfurlongg
by on Nov. 29, 2013 at 4:45 PM
1 mom liked this

 I was surprised that so many people did not realize that homeschooling is really not common around the world and many countries ban out right or heavily restrict homeschooling. Thought I would post a link in a seperate thread...

colins_mom
by Silver Member on Nov. 29, 2013 at 4:51 PM
1 mom liked this
on mobile those all run together :(
rfurlongg
by on Nov. 29, 2013 at 4:55 PM
Quoting colins_mom:

on mobile those all run together :(
In summary: it is mostly illegal or heavily restricted throughout the world. Us homeschooling laws the exception rather than the norm internationally.
Josie_P
by on Nov. 29, 2013 at 4:58 PM
2 moms liked this

Yeah, only here on CM have I known homeschooling to be so popular. I don't live in the US so just the thought of homeschooling is very weird.

AlekD
by Gold Member on Nov. 29, 2013 at 5:05 PM
I am so glad to live in a place where homeschooling is legal and supported in the community. The thought of mandatory government-controlled education gives me the heebie Jeebies. I am so thankful for the right to educate my own children!
AtiFreeFalls
by Silver Member on Nov. 29, 2013 at 5:10 PM

 Very interesting.  I struggled a lot with my decision to send my kids to public school.  All my friends homeschool, and I felt like I was letting my kids down, "letting someone else raise them", etc.  In the end I felt like my children would get a better education in public school than I could give them in a lot of ways and public school will allow me better access to college education and career choices.  Right now virtually everything I could make in wages would be going directly back out to childcare if I were homeschooling.

I know a lot of homeschooling families who are raising awesome kids.  It is just interesting to me that most countries are so restrictive about it.  Why do you think that is?  Is there evidence that publicly schooled children are better off?  Because all my homeschooling friends say otherwise lol.

rfurlongg
by on Nov. 29, 2013 at 5:10 PM
That is actually a bit of a mistake on wiki. On several of the counties it says "mandatory public education." There are few I know for a fact that education is mandatory, but it does not have to be public. Although, schools are certified (like in the US) so that may be why the term mandatory "public" education is used.

Quoting AlekD:

I am so glad to live in a place where homeschooling is legal and supported in the community. The thought of mandatory government-controlled education gives me the heebie Jeebies. I am so thankful for the right to educate my own children!
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
AdrianneHill
by Platinum Member on Nov. 29, 2013 at 5:18 PM
3 moms liked this
I'm surprised people are surprised.
Most countries take education of their citizens much more seriously than we do. And it shows when parents are so afraid of science that they'd rather give their kids a subpar education themselves than explain the world outside their house
rfurlongg
by on Nov. 29, 2013 at 5:26 PM

 

Quoting AtiFreeFalls:

 Very interesting.  I struggled a lot with my decision to send my kids to public school.  All my friends homeschool, and I felt like I was letting my kids down, "letting someone else raise them", etc.  In the end I felt like my children would get a better education in public school than I could give them in a lot of ways and public school will allow me better access to college education and career choices.  Right now virtually everything I could make in wages would be going directly back out to childcare if I were homeschooling.

I know a lot of homeschooling families who are raising awesome kids.  It is just interesting to me that most countries are so restrictive about it.  Why do you think that is?  Is there evidence that publicly schooled children are better off?  Because all my homeschooling friends say otherwise lol.

 I am sure every country that has restrictions on homeschooling has specifice reasons for their laws.

I can speak for the reasoning for Brazil (I suspect their reasoning translates to other nations as well). Brazil has many immigrants throughout it's history. I belive before(or right around) WWI a huge influx of Germans and Belarussians and eatern Europeans flooded their shores. They step up their own towns and schools and a generation later none of them spoken p the language or new the history of their birth country so the govt mandated education that included Portuguese (language) and Brazilian history, geography, and lituratute. Today, if you are not a citizen you do not have mandated education. Their homeschooling rules only apply to Brazilian citizens. 

While wiki says "mandated public" education that is a bit misleading. I grew up there and I did not attend public schools. I attended an international private school that required us to take Portuguese language, and Brazilian and Portuguese history, geopgraphy and liturature (those fulling mandatory education laws).    

rfurlongg
by on Nov. 29, 2013 at 5:34 PM
1 mom liked this
Quoting AdrianneHill:

I'm surprised people are surprised.
Most countries take education of their citizens much more seriously than we do. And it shows when parents are so afraid of science that they'd rather give their kids a subpar education themselves than explain the world outside their house
I am actually supportive of homeschooling and I think for some families it is the only / best options. However, I am also supportive of standards being in place. I wonder, as we continually drop in international rankings for math and science, if we are not moving towards more restriction in homeschooling laws.
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