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Your Assumptions About Welfare Recipients...

Posted by on Dec. 18, 2013 at 2:10 PM
  • 51 Replies
1 mom liked this

are wrong


Your Assumptions About Welfare Recipients Are Wrong

By Bryce Covert on December 18, 2013 at 11:21 am

"Your Assumptions About Welfare Recipients Are Wrong"

Welfare Reform 3x2

CREDIT: AP

The stereotype of the low-income people enrolled in government programs is that they spend the money on frivolities and are unwise with their budgets. But the data proves otherwise. Families who receive public benefits such as housing assistance, welfare cash assistance, food stamps, Medicaid, and Social Security Income (SSI) for the disabled or low-income elderly have much smaller spending budgets than those who don’t receive benefits and spend a bigger portion on the basics such as food, housing, and transportation, according to an analysis by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

On average, families who are enrolled in these public programs spend less than half of what families who aren’t enrolled spend. They also put a bigger percentage of that money toward food, housing, and transportation, devoting 77 percent of their budgets to these necessities compared to about 65 percent for other families. Meanwhile, they spend less, on average, on some things thought to be luxuries like eating out and entertainment. A family that doesn’t get public benefits spends 4.5 percent of its budget on “food away from home,” while a two-parent family who gets benefits spends 4 percent of its budget on eating out and a single parent spends 3.6 percent. “Food away from home spending was higher in both dollar amount and percent of total spending among families not receiving assistance,” the report notes. Families who don’t need assistance also spend more on entertainment in both dollar and percentage terms and devote more of their budgets to “other” expenses.

Families who receive benefits are also more likely to go without higher priced items like houses and cars. Just 3 percent of families who don’t get benefits went without a car, compared to nearly a quarter of those on the rolls. On average, a family that isn’t enrolled in public programs has about two cars, while a family that is enrolled has about one. Meanwhile, more than three-quarters of families not receiving assistance are homeowners, while the opposite is true for families who do need the support: just about three-quarters are renters instead of homeowners.

And while the stereotype of the “welfare queen” is a woman who has more children to increase the benefits she gets from government programs, families who are enrolled look similar to those who aren’t. “Average family size was the same (3.7 persons), whether or not a family received assistance,” the report notes.

In reality, many of these benefits that families rely on are paltry and, worse, have recently shrunk. The value of benefits from the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (TANF), formerly known as welfare, have fallen so that their purchasing power is less than what it was in 1996 for the vast majority of recipients. A family of three that relies solely on TANF won’t be able to make market rent for a two-bedroom apartment and will live at just 50 percent of the poverty line, or $9,765 a year. Food stamps from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) were reduced in November to an average of less than $1.40 a meal and more cuts are likely on their way after Congress agrees to a new farm bill. Housing assistance from the Section 8 rental voucher program got hammered by sequestration and local authorities had to rescind vouchers from those who had gotten off waiting lists, freeze the lists, and reduce the amount of rent each voucher would cover.

Still, these programs represent a vital lifeline. Government programs such as SNAP, SSI, housing assistance, cash assistance, and others kept millions out of poverty last year

by on Dec. 18, 2013 at 2:10 PM
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Replies (1-10):
snookyfritz
by Platinum Member on Dec. 18, 2013 at 2:22 PM

BUMP!

Sisteract
by Whoopie on Dec. 18, 2013 at 2:23 PM
1 mom liked this

From a person who knows no one on welfare, these are my assumptions: Too few job skills for the current market and too many kids for income made.

jaxTheMomm
by Platinum Member on Dec. 18, 2013 at 2:24 PM
14 moms liked this

But my cousin's neighbor's mailman's niece is on benefits and eats lobster every night and drive a caddy!

snookyfritz
by Platinum Member on Dec. 18, 2013 at 2:25 PM
1 mom liked this

And that is the problem with this issue.  Just too many people who know people who know people who know people

Quoting jaxTheMomm:

But my cousin's neighbor's mailman's niece is on benefits and eats lobster every night and drive a caddy!


yourspecialkid
by Platinum Member on Dec. 18, 2013 at 2:30 PM
1 mom liked this

 Yeah, the iphones, fake nails, colored hair, piercings and tattoos were all gifts from someone else.

Of course they have smaller spending budgets...if they didn't they wouldn't be eligible for welfare to begin with.

Having too many kids too soon and not completing a basic education is the downfall of many.

 

snookyfritz
by Platinum Member on Dec. 18, 2013 at 2:33 PM
1 mom liked this

No one I know that is on welfare own any of those things

Quoting yourspecialkid:

 Yeah, the iphones, fake nails, colored hair, piercings and tattoos were all gifts from someone else.

Of course they have smaller spending budgets...if they didn't they wouldn't be eligible for welfare to begin with.

Having too many kids too soon and not completing a basic education is the downfall of many.

 


katzmeow726
by Platinum Member on Dec. 18, 2013 at 2:34 PM
5 moms liked this

My DH works as a food stamp case worker, your assumption is a not-totally-accurate generalization.

1) The cases of too many children aren't as common as you think, or not how you would think. Many time they family was stable until job loss, but they did not continue to have children after the income issues surfaced.  They were able to provide prior to the financial issues.

2) He has seen way too many people come in with masters degrees, trade skills, and work experience that should help them find work...but it isn't.  OR some of them are working, and they just aren't getting paid jack squat.  He knows that all too well.  His bachelors degree gave him a $1/hr raise at work...that's all. Just the other day a lady who had a long term work history with McDonalds came in earning $10 an hour.  At his old job WITH a degree, he was making $10.25.  

 

Quoting Sisteract:

From a person who knows no one on welfare, these are my assumptions: Too few job skills for the current market and too many kids for income made.


jcrew6
by Platinum Member on Dec. 18, 2013 at 2:37 PM

Certain Politicians in our Government needs people on welfare and need expanded entitlment programs in order to get votes and serve a greater agenda. 

I don't judge the individual as much as I wish more americans judged the motives of the politicians and the statistics of the system.

katzmeow726
by Platinum Member on Dec. 18, 2013 at 2:40 PM
2 moms liked this

To add to my above response

he still gets the welfare queens too....just not as regularly as fox news would have you believe.  

Friday
by HRH of MJ on Dec. 18, 2013 at 2:45 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting Sisteract:

From a person who knows no one on welfare, these are my assumptions: Too few job skills for the current market and too many kids for income made.

I'm sure that is true in some cases but there are people like me, who had great jobs w/benefits and then became disabled and had to wait years to get SSD. And my husband who had a decent job but the store closed and due to the number of people looking for work vs the number of jobs available was unable to find work for almost 2 years. I'm talking on McD's day of hiring they had hundreds of people for tens of jobs. Plus the work he found was low wage retail. I still look for a better job for him but all there is around here is nursing, commission only and low wage jobs.

Now that I have my SSD we are a little better off but have lost the bulk of our PA-Kids are on Medicaid and we get $119 in FS. We still struggle and would be homeless if it weren't for my mom and step-dad.

 


Thank God......it's Friday!!!

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