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Angry scientist finds an uneducated internet comment and delivers an epic response...

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by on Dec. 20, 2013 at 12:34 AM
Replies (21-30):
momtoscott
by Platinum Member on Dec. 20, 2013 at 6:35 AM
1 mom liked this

Most are in the same vein, belligerent and muddled.  Angry at the universe.  

Quoting rfhsure: Well the first thing she asked is if I would understand if someone else told me. Yet she never said anything regarding. my reply so she was very unclear about what she was trying to say. Apparently me asking for clarification was upsetting? Then she was just in attack mode. But her saying the post was 'about autism' and 'not about me' is where she went of the deep end lol. Somebody had tiiiii many martoonis! Lol its fine. I appreciate you coming to my defense anyway! I don't recognize her son though. I'm interested to see what kind of replies she makes to other posts in the future.

Quoting Mrs.Pedro: It really wasn't relevant to what you asked the next poster... She just got pissed that it was a pro-vax picture and decided anyone and everyone should be attacked instead of debating logically on the picture. And now we are all dumb heads to her because we think she's nuts lol.



Quoting rfhsure: Eh. That's what I figured. I don't know why she quoted me to begin with. I don't know what relevance her first reply had to the question I asked.





Quoting Mrs.Pedro: Ah yes. Well either way she's coming off more and more nutty by not simply explaining what she meant in her first response. Instead of attacking you it would have been just as easy to explain herself so it would be easier to understand her first comment.







Quoting rfhsure: Oh no, she's insinuating I'm stupid for being immensely confused by literally everything she has said in this post.









Quoting Mrs.Pedro: She's stupid for asking which vaccines they're skipping or delaying? That sure makes you sound smart<---- note the sarcasm font











Quoting cathygymboree:


Quoting rfhsure: What? Your replies do not make any sense.













Quoting cathygymboree:


Quoting rfhsure: Which vaccines are.you forgoing?















Quoting momma-moo: My so has a phd in immunology and pathology of infectious diseases, and we decided to delay and be very selective to vaccinations. This "immunologist" is a nutcase.

Will you understand if she tells you?

Are you positive that you aren't just stupid?


romalove
by Roma on Dec. 20, 2013 at 6:52 AM
4 moms liked this

They have tried, mightily, to make a connection between vaccination and autism.  They have failed.  Every controlled study says no link.  Further, they thought thimerosol was the problem, they removed that, and autism didn't go down but went up.  Why?

Partly because they are diagnosing autism at crazy high rates.  If you make an umbrella large enough you can contain everyone under it.  Kids with mild "spots" of autism under the same banner as profoundly autistic and unable to care for themself and everyone in between, all under the same umbrella.  This is why they took Aspbergers out of "autism" for diagnosis.  

There are a number of reasons autism is so high.  Part of it is genetic.  I have two autistic nephews.  One of them had other issues from birth (he has hydrocephalus and had craniostenosis, which is the premature closing of the bone sutures in the head, he had to have surgery for both issues) and is quite impacted.  The other one has a milder form of autism, didn't have the other issues, but they are each from brothers.  If autism runs in some families (and it does), that has nothing to do with vaccination.

Repeating a lie doesn't make the lie truthful.

romalove
by Roma on Dec. 20, 2013 at 6:53 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting cathygymboree:

A bunch of dumbheads.

Are you five?


UpSheRises
by Platinum Member on Dec. 20, 2013 at 7:04 AM
1 mom liked this
That isn't epic at all. It looks like a run of the mill interweb fight. We've had smarter fights in here for sure.
lilangilyn
by Member on Dec. 20, 2013 at 9:54 AM

 

Quoting romalove:

They have tried, mightily, to make a connection between vaccination and autism.  They have failed.  Every controlled study says no link.  Further, they thought thimerosol was the problem, they removed that, and autism didn't go down but went up.  Why?

Partly because they are diagnosing autism at crazy high rates.  If you make an umbrella large enough you can contain everyone under it.  Kids with mild "spots" of autism under the same banner as profoundly autistic and unable to care for themself and everyone in between, all under the same umbrella.  This is why they took Aspbergers out of "autism" for diagnosis.  

There are a number of reasons autism is so high.  Part of it is genetic.  I have two autistic nephews.  One of them had other issues from birth (he has hydrocephalus and had craniostenosis, which is the premature closing of the bone sutures in the head, he had to have surgery for both issues) and is quite impacted.  The other one has a milder form of autism, didn't have the other issues, but they are each from brothers.  If autism runs in some families (and it does), that has nothing to do with vaccination.

Repeating a lie doesn't make the lie truthful.

 I agree with all this. I have also seen autism running in families. Time magazine a few years ago did a great write up on autism and actually there was some information about the types of parents who have autistic children. There talked about a link between what I will call the "geek" personality and autism.

My nephew is autistic. He is verbal, but barely. Both of his parents are "geeks." Nice people of course but definitely very computer oriented, engineering minded and also not very socially adept. This is also what Time explored.

 

lilangilyn
by Member on Dec. 20, 2013 at 9:58 AM

This is one article that speaks of it. This author has actually rethought some of his original ideas, but not all of them. It does speak to me about my nephew.

http://www.blogher.com/frame.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wired.com%2Fwired%2Farchive%2F9.12%2Faspergers_pr.html&_back=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.blogher.com%2Fsocially-awkward-me-quirky-parents-children-autism

shuturpiehole
by Member on Dec. 20, 2013 at 10:12 AM
1 mom liked this

I personally feel that  while vaccines might not directly cause autism, that since we DON'T know what causes it, maybe, just maybe, it's possible that some people are allergic to something in vaccines, and when it is injected directly into their body, it causes minute neurological damage and changes in some, which develops into autism in people who otherwise would NOT have gotten autism.

I'm not saying anywhere near all cases of autism could be attributed to this. But maybe a lot of the parents whose children were absolutely fine, got a vaccine, then within days or even sometimes hours start exhibiting symptoms... Maybe those children are allergic to something in the vaccine.

Modern medicine doesn't have all the answers.

Quoting buttersworth:

There have been plenty of other scientists and doctors to come out publically and clearly disagree with this immunologist.

The research studies that support vaccinations are funded by the same people that manufacture them!

But for anyone to come out and say these are no good, even harmful, run the gamut of losing public credibility and being ridiculed, with no benefit to their being honest...except that they've done the right thing.


MrsSamMerlotte
by Bronze Member on Dec. 20, 2013 at 10:18 AM
2 moms liked this

It took YEARS for everyone to admit that lead is dangerous to humans.  Years.  Until then, it was suspected, but because it was not proven, they still decided to put lead into paint and many other things that all humans, included children, came in contact with.  Obviously many people were effected.  Im not telling anyone not to vaccinate their kids, but we should all know not to blindly trust in anything, vaccines included.

sha_lyn68
by Bronze Member on Dec. 20, 2013 at 10:46 AM

No I didn't catch the different spelling of aluminum. I did however see the use of mum instead of mom after I posted. "End of" wouldn't stand out to me as being non-America.

Quoting Aestas:

So I guess you didn't catch the "aluminium" and the "End of." which are both hints that the scientist is quite possibly not American.

Quoting sha_lyn68:

That so called scientist is a nutcase. I guess someone forgot to tell him that most countries (including I believe all English speaking ones) do not vaccinate against TB. Going by the spelling and syntax, I'm guessing both the OP and the "scientist" are America.



-beachgal-
by on Dec. 20, 2013 at 11:03 AM
2 moms liked this

Vaccines have done FAR more good than harm, and my kids are fully vaccinated with absolutely no problems whatsoever. 

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