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Execution witnesses: Man gasped for 10 minutes

Posted by on Jan. 16, 2014 at 2:38 PM
  • 167 Replies
2 moms liked this

(CNN) -- Ohio inmate Dennis McGuire appeared to gasp and convulse for roughly 10 minutes before he finally died Thursday during his execution by lethal injection using a new combination of drugs, reporters who witnessed it said.

He was convicted in 1994 of the rape and murder of 22-year-old Joy Stewart, who was seven months pregnant. Her relatives were at Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville to witness his death, according to tweets from television reporter Sheila Gray.

McGuire's "children and daughter-in-law were crying and visibly upset," Gray tweeted.

A Dayton Daily News reporter who also watched the execution said that before the drugs took effect, McGuire thanked Stewart's family for a letter he apparently got. "I'm sorry," McGuire reportedly said.

The convicted murderer was pronounced dead at 10:53 a.m. ET,

The execution generated controversy because, like many states, Ohio has been forced to find new drug protocols after European-based manufacturers banned U.S. prisons from using their drugs in executions -- among them, Danish-based Lundbeck, which manufactures pentobarbital.

The state used a combination of the drugs midazolam, a sedative, and the painkiller hydromorphone, the state corrections department told CNN.

In an opinion piece written for CNN earlier this week, a law professor noted that McGuire's attorneys argued he would "suffocate to death in agony and terror."

"The state disagrees. But the truth is that no one knows exactly how McGuire will die, how long it will take or what he will experience in the process," wrote Elisabeth A. Semel, clinic professor of law and director of the Death Penalty Clinic at U.C. Berkeley School of Law.

According to a pool report from journalists who witnessed the execution, the whole process took more than 15 minutes, during which McGuire made "several loud snorting or snoring sounds."

Ohio ran out of pentobarbital in September, according to JoEllen Smith, the spokeswoman for the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction.

In response to that shortage, the department amended its execution policy to allow for the use of midazolam and hydromorphone.

Stewart's body was discovered by hikers near a creek in southwestern Ohio in February of 1989. Her throat was cut and she had been sodomized.

Death penalty states scramble for lethal injection drugs

The state was set to execute death row inmate Ron Phillips using the new drugs last year, but Gov. John Kasich granted the convicted killer a stay of execution pending a review of a possible organ donation to his family members.

There are currently 139 men and one woman on death row in Ohio, according to the corrections department website.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/16/justice/ohio-dennis-mcguire-execution/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

 

by on Jan. 16, 2014 at 2:38 PM
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Replies (1-10):
paganbaby
by Teflon Don on Jan. 16, 2014 at 2:45 PM
17 moms liked this

I can't say that his prolonged death bothers me in the least.

baconade
by on Jan. 16, 2014 at 2:46 PM
1 mom liked this
I agree with paganbaby.
Sisteract
by Whoopie on Jan. 16, 2014 at 2:48 PM
3 moms liked this

Life in prison is a better, cheaper alternative...Hard labor, water and baloney sandwiches. No health care beyond communicable disease prevention-no AC, gyms, snacks, TV or laying around on one's duff-

His kids wanted to witness his demise? 

rfhsure
by Silver Member on Jan. 16, 2014 at 2:49 PM
9 moms liked this
What he did was utterly terrible and warranted pain and death. However, I don't really support execution as punishment. I fully understand the emotional rush of hatred and wanting someone to die painfully, I do. But I just...I don't necessarily support the eye for an eye concept of treating an inhumane being with more inhumanity. I don't feel there's a lesson to be learned there. A person who is that sick will feel no remorse and ultimately view death as a welcome escape. Someone who does feel remorse will deal with that every day. Living out their days in prison recollecting what they've done as a person is greater punishment than a quick goodbye. In a way that's almost relieving them of their responsibility to reflect on what they've done.
Sisteract
by Whoopie on Jan. 16, 2014 at 2:51 PM
1 mom liked this

I agree 100%-

Quoting rfhsure: What he did was utterly terrible and warranted pain and death. However, I don't really support execution as punishment. I fully understand the emotional rush of hatred and wanting someone to die painfully, I do. But I just...I don't necessarily support the eye for an eye concept of treating an inhumane being with more inhumanity. I don't feel there's a lesson to be learned there. A person who is that sick will feel no remorse and ultimately view death as a welcome escape. Someone who does feel remorse will deal with that every day. Living out their days in prison recollecting what they've done as a person is greater punishment than a quick goodbye. In a way that's almost relieving them of their responsibility to reflect on what they've done.


hismommy2010
by on Jan. 16, 2014 at 2:51 PM
4 moms liked this

 I get that it was rough for his family to sit there and watch him die that way. However are we forgetting the pregnant mom he raped, and killed?

Are we forgetting the details of what he did to that pregnant mom, let's think about the baby in that mom's belly, that baby was 7 months in term. I"m sure that baby suffered for a good period of time while the mother was being raped and killed...

if we are going to allow death to happen to convicted inmates, then why should be think into what they go through while the die? I mean if you are going to make it legal to kill them, why worry about how comforting it is for them to die?

Sisteract
by Whoopie on Jan. 16, 2014 at 2:53 PM
7 moms liked this

Because despite all evidence to the contrary, these are still human beings.

Unless we all want to sink to the level/behaviors of the lowest among us- 

Quoting hismommy2010:

 I get that it was rough for his family to sit there and watch him die that way. However are we forgetting the pregnant mom he raped, and killed?

Are we forgetting the details of what he did to that pregnant mom, let's think about the baby in that mom's belly, that baby was 7 months in term. I"m sure that baby suffered for a good period of time while the mother was being raped and killed...

if we are going to allow death to happen to convicted inmates, then why should be think into what they go through while the die? I mean if you are going to make it legal to kill them, why worry about how comforting it is for them to die?


Lo428
by Member on Jan. 16, 2014 at 2:54 PM
4 moms liked this

I don't feel bad for him at all. I'm sure his victim's death was full of agony and terror.

LuvmyAiden
by on Jan. 16, 2014 at 2:54 PM
4 moms liked this

How long did his victim and her baby suffer? Probably far longer. Sometimes the punishment fits the crime.

EntrepeneurMom
by Bronze Member on Jan. 16, 2014 at 2:56 PM
4 moms liked this
After reading what he did to her, I'm glad he suffered.
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