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No Jobs?

Posted by on Feb. 11, 2014 at 11:26 AM
  • 122 Replies

 

Poll

Question: Do you think there is 'a real disconnect' between unemployment and available jobs?

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Yes

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Total Votes: 44

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Last night during the Olympics, a commercial started running called “I Am a Factory.” It’s part of a larger campaign sponsored by Walmart, called “Work Is a Beautiful Thing.” The commercial features real people doing real work in real factories all across America. It’s not very glamorous, but it’s honest and authentic, and I was honored to narrate it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7OQcoDQq3-o

Today, I see that some people are calling for my head. Other’s want me to run for office. And some have demanded the surgical removal of my vocal cords. What better way to spend a rainy Sunday than by responding to a few? 

Let’s start with Kevin Groce.

“Mike - Walmart was the last thing I would ever think you would do anything for! Why? 

Hi Kevin,

That’s easy. Walmart has committed to purchase 250 billion dollars of American made products over the next decade. In essence, that’s a purchase order made out to the USA for a quarter of a trillion dollars. That means dozens of American factories are going to reopen all over the country. Millions of dollars will pour straight into local economies, and hundreds of thousands of new manufacturing positions will need to be filled. That’s a massive undertaking packed with enormous challenges, and I want to help. I want to see them succeed. Don’t you? Honestly Kevin, who gives a crap about your feelings toward Walmart? Who gives a crap about mine? Isn’t this the kind of initiative we can all get behind?

I ran across this post on FB today, and thought this portion particularly was interesting:

One of the real disconnects around this issue for me has been the steady drumbeat of unemployment in the headlines. I know that the labor participation rate is at historic lows. I know that millions are out of work. But I also know that I’ve seen Help Wanted signs in all 50 states. Even at the height of the recession, the employers I met on Dirty Jobs were all hiring. They still are. And they all told me the same thing - the biggest challenge of running a business was finding people who were willing to learn a new skill and work hard. 

Read the rest at Mike Rowe's FB page

by on Feb. 11, 2014 at 11:26 AM
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Replies (1-10):
SuperChicken
by on Feb. 11, 2014 at 11:39 AM

Once they HAVE created manufacturing jobs in America, I'll pat them on the back.     They don't get pats on the back for saying they're going to.   

But I do agree that there are available jobs that people don't want to do, especially if the pay is low, in some areas.   For example, would I want to work in a slaughter house knee deep in viscera for minimum wage and no benefits?  Nope.  I wouldn't.  

LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Feb. 11, 2014 at 11:44 AM

So... now I know you need to read this response from Mr. Rowe (it might help if you read the whole thing... it's under 3000 words, it doesn't take long):

Walmart can change the game. But the business of filling a few hundred thousand new factory jobs is not a slam dunk. Because in spite of high unemployment, hundreds of thousands of manufacturing jobs currently exist that no one seems to want. That little piece of the narrative doesn’t get a lot of press, but it should. Because the skills gap is real, and it’s a mistake to assume that people will line up to take jobs that so many people love to disparage. 

and:

Rose Marie Bayless writes - 

“Dear Mike - There's only one little problem with your new commercial for Walmart....and that is that they do NOT provide manufacturing jobs.” 

Hi Rose. You’re correct - Walmart doesn’t “provide” manufacturing jobs. Mostly because they’re not a manufacturing company. They’re a retailer. They buy all sorts of things from all sorts of suppliers all over the world, which they then sell to millions of Americans. In fact, 60% of all Americans shop there. That’s why Walmart is so successful. And that’s why they can do a great deal to encourage their suppliers to manufacture goods domestically. That’s what this initiative is all about - a financial commitment to buy from American suppliers.

Quoting SuperChicken:

Once they HAVE created manufacturing jobs in America, I'll pat them on the back.     They don't get pats on the back for saying they're going to.   

But I do agree that there are available jobs that people don't want to do, especially if the pay is low, in some areas.   For example, would I want to work in a slaughter house knee deep in viscera for minimum wage and no benefits?  Nope.  I wouldn't.  

Is it nice to be able to afford 'no work at all' instead of an unpleasant entry level job?

waldorfmom
by Bronze Member on Feb. 11, 2014 at 11:48 AM
1 mom liked this

Thank you for the great information.

SuperChicken
by on Feb. 11, 2014 at 11:50 AM


Quoting LindaClement:

So... now I know you need to read this response from Mr. Rowe (it might help if you read the whole thing... it's under 3000 words, it doesn't take long):

Walmart can change the game. But the business of filling a few hundred thousand new factory jobs is not a slam dunk. Because in spite of high unemployment, hundreds of thousands of manufacturing jobs currently exist that no one seems to want. That little piece of the narrative doesn’t get a lot of press, but it should. Because the skills gap is real, and it’s a mistake to assume that people will line up to take jobs that so many people love to disparage. 

and:

Rose Marie Bayless writes - 

“Dear Mike - There's only one little problem with your new commercial for Walmart....and that is that they do NOT provide manufacturing jobs.” 

Hi Rose. You’re correct - Walmart doesn’t “provide” manufacturing jobs. Mostly because they’re not a manufacturing company. They’re a retailer. They buy all sorts of things from all sorts of suppliers all over the world, which they then sell to millions of Americans. In fact, 60% of all Americans shop there. That’s why Walmart is so successful. And that’s why they can do a great deal to encourage their suppliers to manufacture goods domestically. That’s what this initiative is all about - a financial commitment to buy from American suppliers.

Quoting SuperChicken:

Once they HAVE created manufacturing jobs in America, I'll pat them on the back.     They don't get pats on the back for saying they're going to.   

But I do agree that there are available jobs that people don't want to do, especially if the pay is low, in some areas.   For example, would I want to work in a slaughter house knee deep in viscera for minimum wage and no benefits?  Nope.  I wouldn't.  

Is it nice to be able to afford 'no work at all' instead of an unpleasant entry level job?

Is that what you wanted me to read, or is it at the facebook link?  I'm not on Facebook so I couldn't read what was at the link - it asked me to sign up which I don't want to do.   If it's what you've posted above, then that doesn't change what I said.    Once the jobs are created, I'll pat them on the back.   Not before.   Unlike Nobel Peace prizes,  I want results before accolades. 

I'm not sure if your comment Is it nice to be able to afford 'no work at all' instead of an unpleasant entry level job? is some sort of personal jab at me, but yes it is nice, thanks. 

FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Feb. 11, 2014 at 11:51 AM
1 mom liked this

Let them actually create. At this point, they are only saying they will.  A promise made.  Honestly, there is still time to renege on that promise.  Lets hope they do not.

pamelax3
by Gold Member on Feb. 11, 2014 at 11:59 AM
2 moms liked this

I know in my area, there are plenty of jobs, however no one wants them, they are at the beginners levels and most feel they are to good for that. I applaud Walmart for trying to bring jobs back to the US, but until people understand that working is better the sitting on unemployment no one will take them

LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Feb. 11, 2014 at 12:00 PM

You're really not reading this at all, are you?

Walmart is a RETAILER. They aren't going to 'create' any manufacturing jobs... of which there are already MANY going unfilled.

Unfilled because of your superior attitude toward dirty work, which mirrors the same superiority of a great many who moan constantly about how there are 'no jobs' or, perhaps more accurately, 'no good-paying easy jobs in the warm where they can book off as many shifts as they can get covered for them...'

Walmart, btw, is one of the US's largest suppliers of those jobs.

Here's another piece that specifically addresses your demand for accomplishment before you'll relent (since you can't read it):

"Sean Murray’s not done with me. He writes again, 

“Misguided. Mike Rowe should have never done this ad due to the fact it came from WalMart. I like the message, but Walmart is one of the reasons a lot of manufacturing was lost in the United States. The vast majority of merchandise Walmart sells in the U.S. is manufactured abroad. The company searches the world for the cheapest goods possible, and this means buying from low-wage factories overseas. Walmart boasts of direct relationships with nearly 20,000 Chinese suppliers, and purchased $27 billion worth of Chinese-made goods in 2006. According to the Economic Policy Institute, Walmart’s trade with China alone eliminated 133,000 U.S. manufacturing jobs between 2001 and 2006 and accounted for 11.2 percent of the nation’s total job loss due to trade. With $419 billion in annual net sales, Walmart’s market power is so immense that blah, blah, blah...”

Forgive me Sean, but I’ve replaced the rest of your rant with “blah blah blah” because it appears to have been cut and pasted word for word from a political site dedicated to destroying Walmart. And also because reactions like yours are the reason our country is paralyzed. You’re like the diehard conservatives who freaked out because I sat too close to Bill Maher, and the diehard liberals that got all bent when I got too close to Glenn Beck. You’re stuck in your own narrative.

Step back for a minute. Look at what’s happening here. Walmart has just promised to do something you claim to want them to do. How do you react? Do you encourage them? Do you support them? No. You hold fast to the the party line. You lash out. Our country is falling apart around us, and you criticize me. For what? For doing a voiceover on a commercial that celebrates the dignity of hard work? I realize you’d prefer it if Costco was pushing this campaign forward, but guess what - they’re not. 

But, maybe they will? Maybe they’ll all get on board? Target, Best Buy, Kohl’s, Macy’s, Dollar General, Home Depot, Lowe’s...maybe they’ll all make similar commitments to American manufacturing? And maybe Americans will finally make it easy by demanding and buying more American made products. So far - that hasn’t happened. Maybe Walmart will break the logjam. Someone has to at least try, don’t you think? 

Seriously Sean, do you and all the other detractors really want to see this campaign fail because it’s coming from a retailer whose policies you don’t approve of? Do us all a favor - try to get over it. Try to get over your disappointment with me. Try to get over your disappointment with Walmart. Try to get past your issues with the messenger, and take another look at the message...

A quarter trillion dollar commitment to American made products. 250,000 new jobs. 

Really - what’s not to like?"

Quoting SuperChicken:


Quoting LindaClement:

So... now I know you need to read this response from Mr. Rowe (it might help if you read the whole thing... it's under 3000 words, it doesn't take long):

Walmart can change the game. But the business of filling a few hundred thousand new factory jobs is not a slam dunk. Because in spite of high unemployment, hundreds of thousands of manufacturing jobs currently exist that no one seems to want. That little piece of the narrative doesn’t get a lot of press, but it should. Because the skills gap is real, and it’s a mistake to assume that people will line up to take jobs that so many people love to disparage. 

and:

Rose Marie Bayless writes - 

“Dear Mike - There's only one little problem with your new commercial for Walmart....and that is that they do NOT provide manufacturing jobs.” 

Hi Rose. You’re correct -
Walmart doesn’t “provide” manufacturing jobs. Mostly because they’re not a manufacturing company. They’re a retailer. They buy all sorts of things from all sorts of suppliers all over the world, which they then sell to millions of Americans. In fact, 60% of all Americans shop there. That’s why Walmart is so successful. And that’s why they can do a great deal to encourage their suppliers to manufacture goods domestically. That’s what this initiative is all about - a financial commitment to buy from American suppliers.

Quoting SuperChicken:

Once they HAVE created manufacturing jobs in America, I'll pat them on the back.     They don't get pats on the back for saying they're going to.   

But I do agree that there are available jobs that people don't want to do, especially if the pay is low, in some areas.   For example, would I want to work in a slaughter house knee deep in viscera for minimum wage and no benefits?  Nope.  I wouldn't.  

Is it nice to be able to afford 'no work at all' instead of an unpleasant entry level job?

Is that what you wanted me to read, or is it at the facebook link?  I'm not on Facebook so I couldn't read what was at the link - it asked me to sign up which I don't want to do.   If it's what you've posted above, then that doesn't change what I said.    Once the jobs are created, I'll pat them on the back.   Not before.   Unlike Nobel Peace prizes,  I want results before accolades. 

I'm not sure if your comment Is it nice to be able to afford 'no work at all' instead of an unpleasant entry level job? is some sort of personal jab at me, but yes it is nice, thanks. 


LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Feb. 11, 2014 at 12:01 PM

'Sean Murray’s not done with me. He writes again, 

“Misguided. Mike Rowe should have never done this ad due to the fact it came from WalMart. I like the message, but Walmart is one of the reasons a lot of manufacturing was lost in the United States. The vast majority of merchandise Walmart sells in the U.S. is manufactured abroad. The company searches the world for the cheapest goods possible, and this means buying from low-wage factories overseas. Walmart boasts of direct relationships with nearly 20,000 Chinese suppliers, and purchased $27 billion worth of Chinese-made goods in 2006. According to the Economic Policy Institute, Walmart’s trade with China alone eliminated 133,000 U.S. manufacturing jobs between 2001 and 2006 and accounted for 11.2 percent of the nation’s total job loss due to trade. With $419 billion in annual net sales, Walmart’s market power is so immense that blah, blah, blah...”

Forgive me Sean, but I’ve replaced the rest of your rant with “blah blah blah” because it appears to have been cut and pasted word for word from a political site dedicated to destroying Walmart. And also because reactions like yours are the reason our country is paralyzed. You’re like the diehard conservatives who freaked out because I sat too close to Bill Maher, and the diehard liberals that got all bent when I got too close to Glenn Beck. You’re stuck in your own narrative.

Step back for a minute. Look at what’s happening here. Walmart has just promised to do something you claim to want them to do. How do you react? Do you encourage them? Do you support them? No. You hold fast to the the party line. You lash out. Our country is falling apart around us, and you criticize me. For what? For doing a voiceover on a commercial that celebrates the dignity of hard work? I realize you’d prefer it if Costco was pushing this campaign forward, but guess what - they’re not. 

But, maybe they will? Maybe they’ll all get on board? Target, Best Buy, Kohl’s, Macy’s, Dollar General, Home Depot, Lowe’s...maybe they’ll all make similar commitments to American manufacturing? And maybe Americans will finally make it easy by demanding and buying more American made products. So far - that hasn’t happened. Maybe Walmart will break the logjam. Someone has to at least try, don’t you think? 

Seriously Sean, do you and all the other detractors really want to see this campaign fail because it’s coming from a retailer whose policies you don’t approve of? Do us all a favor - try to get over it. Try to get over your disappointment with me. Try to get over your disappointment with Walmart. Try to get past your issues with the messenger, and take another look at the message...

A quarter trillion dollar commitment to American made products. 250,000 new jobs. 

Really - what’s not to like?'

Quoting FromAtoZ:

Let them actually create. At this point, they are only saying they will.  A promise made.  Honestly, there is still time to renege on that promise.  Lets hope they do not.


PPCLC
by Bronze Member on Feb. 11, 2014 at 12:02 PM
1 mom liked this

My husband lost his job a year ago (yesterday was the one year anniversary of his termination) from a job he had held down for 14 1/2 years.

There are jobs out there for sure. It's getting your resume or application even looked at for consideration that is an entirely different subject.

My husband is now 56-years old and has the following qualifications under his job experience belt from his most recent employment alone: management, supervisory, customer service, shipping and receiving, selling (a little bit here and there), driving, metal roofing and rain gutter (the type of company he was in that he was fired from) building, distributing, and even handling, and all other manner of general working in a warehouse.

He applied to so many places this past year. Every day, he filled out about 25 online applications/submitted his resume or more. Most places, at least out here in our state, do not want you to just walk in off the street and fill-out an application.

He applied to fast food restaurants, bar and grill restaurants, auto sales, call center sales, telemarketing, janitorial, landscaping, cable laying, bus driving (he has experience in from previous employment), bus washing, truck driving...........and I could keep going on....all of which are out of the scope of his normal, marketable skills but he just wanted to be hired, even if it was a cut in pay from his previous job.

He heard nothing from them.

He applied to Costco, Home Depot, Sam's Club, Sears, Target, Amazon and yes...Walmart. Never heard back.

So my point is simple, really: yes, there are jobs available and yes, there are people out there willing to work wherever and for whomever.

The key is getting that foot in the door for a simple interview, and it's not as easy as it sounds.

He and I both start CNA classes on March 3rd. We will graduate on April 11th and after we both take the state board exam. He is ready to jump into a field that is completely out of the box for him but that he'll do beautifully in.

Is he nervous? Of course. At 56-years old, it can be a little daunting to change course. But he is SO ready and so excited. It's very sweet and I adore him even more for wanting to make that change in life so drastically. :)

LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Feb. 11, 2014 at 12:05 PM

Yikes... fired is bad.

It's good to hear how diligent his job search has been, and the additional training can't help but keep his energy up. What's CNA?

In smaller companies, it's often more successful to get to talk to a live human than online submissions. Networking can turn out to be far more helpful than almost anything else, regardless of how few jobs are available.

Quoting PPCLC:

My husband lost his job a year ago (yesterday was the one year anniversary of his termination) from a job he had held down for 14 1/2 years.

There are jobs out there for sure. It's getting your resume or application even looked at for consideration that is an entirely different subject.

My husband is now 56-years old and has the following qualifications under his job experience belt from his most recent employment alone: management, supervisory, customer service, shipping and receiving, selling (a little bit here and there), driving, metal roofing and rain gutter (the type of company he was in that he was fired from) building, distributing, and even handling, and all other manner of general working in a warehouse.

He applied to so many places this past year. Every day, he filled out about 25 online applications/submitted his resume or more. Most places, at least out here in our state, do not want you to just walk in off the street and fill-out an application.

He applied to fast food restaurants, bar and grill restaurants, auto sales, call center sales, telemarketing, janitorial, landscaping, cable laying, bus driving (he has experience in from previous employment), bus washing, truck driving...........and I could keep going on....all of which are out of the scope of his normal, marketable skills but he just wanted to be hired, even if it was a cut in pay from his previous job.

He heard nothing from them.

He applied to Costco, Home Depot, Sam's Club, Sears, Target, Amazon and yes...Walmart. Never heard back.

So my point is simple, really: yes, there are jobs available and yes, there are people out there willing to work wherever and for whomever.

The key is getting that foot in the door for a simple interview, and it's not as easy as it sounds.

He and I both start CNA classes on March 3rd. We will graduate on April 11th and after we both take the state board exam. He is ready to jump into a field that is completely out of the box for him but that he'll do beautifully in.

Is he nervous? Of course. At 56-years old, it can be a little daunting to change course. But he is SO ready and so excited. It's very sweet and I adore him even more for wanting to make that change in life so drastically. :)


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