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Culture Despite political pressure, St. Patty's parade will stay straight in Boston

Posted by on Mar. 11, 2014 at 8:37 AM
  • 151 Replies


Culture

Despite political pressure, St. Patty's parade will stay straight in Boston

Charlie Butts   (OneNewsNow.com) Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Boston's St. Patrick's Day Parade will take place again this year, minus homosexual groups, despite their repeated demands.

In the 1990's homosexuals wanted to march in the parade, and when organizers refused, they sued.

Brian Camenker of Mass Resistance tells OneNewsNow the lawsuit reached the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled 9-0 parade organizers could choose who participates.

That's because it's a privately operated event. The parade is sponsored by the South Boston Allied War Veterans Council. This year's parade is March 16. 

Camenker, Brian (MassResistance)"So this year the new mayor, Marty Walsh, who is a 1,000 percent pro-homosexual, decided that he was going to help the homosexual activists force the issue on this," Camenker recalls.

There were discussions with parade organizers, who stated what they have said before: homosexuals can march, just without banners and signs proclaiming a homosexual message.

"If you just want to show up and march with a normal group and don't talk about that, they didn't care," Camenker explains.

According to the parade website, organizers said they were deceived by a homosexual rights group, Mass Equality, that claimed 20 members of gay rights group LGBT Veterans of Equality wanted to march in the parade. 

As the homosexual groups were lobbying for a compromise, parade organizers learned there are not 20 members in the veterans group and, in fact, could not confirm such a group even existed. 

"It became evident to us we were being misled by them and that is where negotiations ended," the Veterans Council stated in a press release

Two Catholic schools decided to keep their floats parked when it appeared homosexual groups were gaining an edge, but officials decided to stick with their policy so their floats will roll again this year.

Homosexuals have their own so-called pride event in June.

- See more at: http://www.onenewsnow.com/culture/2014/03/11/despite-political-pressure-st-pattys-parade-will-stay-straight-in-boston#.Ux8CToV_iM8
by on Mar. 11, 2014 at 8:37 AM
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candlegal
by Judy on Mar. 11, 2014 at 8:39 AM


New York Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks at a news conference in the Brownsville neighborhood in the borough of Brooklyn, New York January 30, 2014. REUTERS/Eric Thayer  

New York City mayor to protest St. Patty’s Day march

Chuck Ross
Reporter, Daily Caller News Foundation

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio is going against the grain yet again.

The newly elected mayor says that he will not take part in this year’s largest St. Patrick’s Day parade because organizers won’t allow participants to carry gay pride signs, CBS New York reports.

Parade organizers said that gay rights activists can participate in the parade, but signage is forbidden since it detracts from the event’s focus on Irish heritage.

“I will be participating in a number of other events to honor the Irish heritage of this city and the contributions of Irish Americans, but I simply disagree with the organizers of that parade in their exclusion of some individuals in this city,” said de Blasio.

Michael Bloomberg, de Blasio’s predecessor, marched in the St. Patrick’s Day event during his tenure, despite calls from gay rights groups for a mayoral boycott.

In a related decision, de Blasio said he would not heed demands from gay rights groups who demanded that uniformed city employees be barred from participating in the parade.

“I respect the right of our city workers to march in uniform, period,” de Blasio said.

Organizers of the parade, which ventures down 5th Avenue, say that the event is “our country’s oldest and proudest Irish tradition.” It was first held in 1762.


source

futureshock
by Ruby Member on Mar. 11, 2014 at 8:54 AM
13 moms liked this

I don't understand what they want.  Do they just want to participate in the St. Patrick's Day aspect of the parade and they happen to be gay?  If so then I see no reason why they shouldn't participate.  If, however, they want to participate in a "Gay Pride" sort of way then I don't think it is appropriate since that is not the focus of the parade.

Mommabearbergh
by on Mar. 11, 2014 at 8:54 AM
Do you have a local source?

The st pattys day parade has always been a good parade. I don't care for the alcohol people drink that day during the parade.
candlegal
by Judy on Mar. 11, 2014 at 9:01 AM


Boston, NYC mayors to skip St. Pat's parades

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BOSTON (AP) — At least two big-city mayors say they'll boycott St. Patrick's Day parades to protest policies on gay groups.

Boston Mayor Martin Walsh said this week he's trying to broker a deal with his city's parade organizers to allow a group of gay military veterans to march. The son of Irish immigrants said Wednesday that allowing gay groups to participate is "long overdue." In New York, Mayor Bill de Blasio earlier said he's skipping the nation's largest St. Patrick's Day parade in Manhattan because participants are not allowed to carry signs or banners that identify them as gay.

Boston parade organizers appear unwilling to budge. John Hurley, the plaintiff in a case in which the Supreme Court ruled in his favor in 1995 to allow organizers to keep out gay and lesbian groups, said "it's final" that gay groups will continue to be excluded.

Hurley said Walsh, who marched in the parade when he was a Democratic state legislator before being elected mayor in November, "is not in a position" to overturn the court's decision.

Lead parade organizer Philip Wuschke Jr. said gay people are not prohibited from marching with other groups. But he said organizers do not want the parade to turn into a demonstration for a particular group.

"The theme of the parade is St. Patrick's Day. It is not a sexually oriented parade," he said. "All we want to do is have a happy parade. The parade is a day of celebration, not demonstration."

Walsh's predecessor, longtime Mayor Thomas Menino, had refused to participate in the parade after the 1995 decision.

The New York City parade, a tradition that predates the city itself, draws more than 1 million people each March 17 to Fifth Avenue, one of Manhattan's most famous thoroughfares, to watch about 200,000 participants. It has long been a stop on the city's political trail and includes marching bands, Irish dancers and thousands of uniformed city workers.

"I will be participating in a number of other events to honor the Irish heritage of this city," de Blasio said during a news conference this month. "But I simply disagree with the organizers of that parade."

Since the 1990s, the event's ban on gay signs and banners has spurred protests and litigation and led to the creation of an alternative, gay-friendly St. Patrick's Day parade in the city's Queens borough. In recent years, several elected officials — including de Blasio when he was the city's elected public advocate — attended the inclusive parade and boycotted the traditional parade.

Though de Blasio's predecessor, Mayor Michael Bloomberg, was a staunch supporter of same-sex marriage rights, he still marched in the Fifth Avenue parade all 12 years he was in office.

The parade dates to 1762, more than a century before all five boroughs linked to form modern New York City. It is run by a private organization, and judges have said the organizers have a First Amendment right to choose participants in their event. The organizers have ruled that some groups, such as colleges or civic organizations, can identify themselves, but LGBT groups cannot.

The new speaker of the City Council, Melissa Mark-Viverito, this week banned any council signage at the parade, though individual members can still march. She will not.

De Blasio has resisted calls from some advocates to ban city workers — such as the NYPD or FDNY — from marching while wearing their uniforms or carrying signs. He has said he will once again march in the alternative parade in Queens.

source

jessilin0113
by Platinum Member on Mar. 11, 2014 at 9:02 AM
2 moms liked this


Quote:

"If you just want to show up and march with a normal group and don't talk about that, they didn't care," Camenker explains.


Classy.

Also, remember yesterday, and the thread about the murdered lesbians, and Candle was all about an unbiased source?  LOL. 

candlegal
by Judy on Mar. 11, 2014 at 9:02 AM

source

Quoting Mommabearbergh: Do you have a local source? The st pattys day parade has always been a good parade. I don't care for the alcohol people drink that day during the parade.


Countess79
by on Mar. 11, 2014 at 9:03 AM

AMEN!

lizmarie1975
by Gold Member on Mar. 11, 2014 at 9:03 AM

Why Doesn’t Boston’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade Allow Gay Groups to March?

51620115-spectators-react-to-the-irish-american-gay-lesbian-and

Spectators react to the Irish-American Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Group of Boston during their appearance in the 1993 Boston St. Patrick's Day parade.

Photo by John Mottern/AFP/Getty Images

Until yesterday, it looked like gay groups would be allowed to march in Boston’s St. Patrick’s Day parade for the first time in two decades. Under pressure from a new mayor who announced that he won’t participate in the parade unless the gay exclusion ends, the Allied War Veterans Council, which sponsors the event, had agreed to allow an LGBTQ veteran’s group to participate—but only if the word gay was absent from their clothing and signs. (By that logic, they might as well hold the parade in rural Tennessee.) On Monday, the deal fell apart when AWVC claimed the gay group was trying “to enter this parade under false pretenses.”

This green-tinted anti-gay animosity isn’t limited to Boston, of course: New York City’s new mayor Bill de Blasio announced that he would boycott the world’s largest St. Patrick’s Day parade because it, too, prohibits openly gay groups from marching. Why are these high-profile events in liberal East Coast cities such hotbeds of bigotry?

Boston’s exclusionary history began in 1992 and 1993, when local courts ruled in favor of the Irish-American Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Group of Boston—known as GLIB—which wanted to march in the St. Patrick’s Day parade. The massive procession through Southie—Boston’s traditionally Irish, predominantly Catholic neighborhood—is heavy on veterans groups, police departments, and local politicians. Although AWVC’s parade—which attracts more than 1 million spectators each year—is privately organized, it is partially funded with taxpayer dollars. (The Boston Globe reports that the 2013 parade cost the city more than $315,000 in police overtime alone.) Consequently, courts agreed that the organizers had unfairly discriminated against GLIB.

GLIB’s legal victory didn’t translate to a warm reception from parade-goers, though. Gay marchers faced slurs, spit, smoke bombs, and snowballs from dozens of spectators along the parade route, in what the Boston Globe referred to as “a 5-mile gantlet of hostility that sometimes threatened to erupt into wide-scale violence.” Thousands more parade-goers, some of them wearing T-shirts bearing the words “90 Years Without Queers,” turned their backs when the group passed. Riot police marched alongside the GLIB contingent in order to maintain calm.

After 92 consecutive years of celebrating Boston’s Hibernian heritage, the AWVC canceled the 1994 parade rather than allow LGBTQ Irish-Americans to participate. The organizers were adamant in their homophobia. Former Mayor Thomas Menino asked as many as eight other local organizations to take over the planning of the parade, but all stood together in anti-gay solidarity. In 1995, the AWVC appealed all the way to the Supreme Court, which (correctly) recognized the private organizers’ right to exclude groups. (If this seems unreasonable, imagine a Gay Pride parade being forced to include Fred Phelps’ Westboro Baptist Church.) Of course, just because the parade organizers can exclude gays, that doesn’t mean they should.

Nowadays, many cities, including Boston and New York, host segregated parades. In Boston, LGBT groups march an hour after the AWVC-sponsored parade, in a separate event organized by Veterans for Peace. Politicians struggle with the consequences of boycotting the main parade, attempting to placate both the gay and Irish communities. (Across the Atlantic in Dublin, none of this is an issue; gay-themed floats are regularly included in their St. Patrick’s Day celebrations.)

Most parade-goers seem largely unconcerned with the ban on gay groups, turning out in droves to spend the day participating in traditional song and dance, swilling green beer, and enjoying general merriment with family and friends. It’s good craic. Corporations also seem unconcerned about the exclusionary policies: Westin, Sam Adams, and Gillette are among the many sponsors supporting Boston’s parade.

This year, Boston organizers point to a vague dress code—suits or military uniforms only—that gay participants must conform to. Never mind that the official parade website shows a Darth Vader/Storm Trooper contingent participating in years past. If you squint really hard, I guess that qualifies as a military uniform, but it seems safe to assume that MassEquality—the LGBTQ group fighting for gay representation—will face heightened scrutiny about adhering to the dress code if gays are allowed to march.

People who oppose LGBTQ participation in these St. Patrick’s Day commemorations like to point out that the cities already host Gay Pride events. Meanwhile, Philip J. Wuschke Jr., one of the organizers of the Boston parade, told the Globe, “Messages of LGBT equality are not in keeping with the messages of pride in Irish heritage the parade promotes.” Apparently, being both gay and Irish is too much identity for one person to have.

Update, March 6: According to the Boston Herald, the Westin Boston Waterfront has asked parade organizers to remove its name from their website. Similarly, Gillette confirmed that its support consists of "limited use" of a company-owned parking lot on parade day. Both sponsors' logos were prominently featured on the parade's website as late as March 5; those logos are no longer visible. A full list of supporting organizations is available here.


http://www.slate.com/blogs/outward/2014/03/05/boston_s_st_patrick_s_day_parade_why_aren_t_gays_allowed_to_march.html

candlegal
by Judy on Mar. 11, 2014 at 9:04 AM

You don't like USA today

Quoting jessilin0113:

Quote:"If you just want to show up and march with a normal group and don't talk about that, they didn't care," Camenker explains.

Classy.

Also, remember yesterday, and the thread about the murdered lesbians, and Candle was all about an unbiased source?  LOL. 


coolmommy2x
by Gold Member on Mar. 11, 2014 at 9:06 AM
I don't see why who you have sex with should determine if you can or can not march in a parade.
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