Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Black Man Sentenced To Death By All-White Jury Freed After 30 Years

Posted by on Mar. 13, 2014 at 3:12 AM
  • 19 Replies


By Nicole Flatow on March 12, 2014 at 12:36 pm

"Black Man Sentenced To Death By All-White Jury Freed After 30 Years"

In this frame grab from video provided by WAFB-TV 9, Glenn Ford, 64, talks to the media as he leaves a maximum security prison, Tuesday.

In this frame grab from video provided by WAFB-TV 9, Glenn Ford, 64, talks to the media as he leaves a maximum security prison, Tuesday.

CREDIT: AP Photo/WAFB-TV 9

Glenn Ford was Louisiana’s longest-serving death row inmate until Tuesday, when he walked free after 30 years behind bars in a notorious maximum security prison. For three decades, he had maintained he didn’t commit the murder of which he was accused and wasn’t present at the time it occurred.

Ford, an African American man, first became a suspect in the murder of Isadore Rozeman, a jeweler and watchmaker for whom Ford occasionally did some yard work, when the girlfriend of a fellow suspect implicated Ford in the murder. Later testifying at his trial, she stated that she “lied about all of it.”

Ford was nonetheless convicted and sentenced to death by an all-white jury on testimony that the shooter was probably left-handed, that there were traces of gun powder particles on his hands, and that fingerprints found on a bag at the scene had more in common with Ford than two alternative suspects, according to the Capital Post Conviction Project of Louisiana. There were no witnesses to the alleged crime, and no weapon found. His two court-appointed lawyers had almost no experience with jury trials or criminal cases, let alone capital cases in which the defendant’s life was on the line. And even though a court later reviewing the conviction agreed that prosecutors had withheld evidence favorable to Ford, it declined to grant him a new trial, reasoning that this evidence would not have made the difference.

What finally changed the prosecutors’ position was a confession by another man who had been a suspect all along that he shot and killed Rozeman, given to the state by a confidential informant from a county police department, according to the Capital Post Conviction Project. The state cited only new “credible evidence.”

“I’ve been locked up almost 30 years for something I didn’t do,” Ford said. “I can’t go back and do anything I should have been doing when I was 35, 38, 40, stuff like that.” He added that his kids were babies when he was hauled off to prison, and those kids now have their own babies.

Ford’s exoneration brings the tally of death row inmates cleared of all charges to 144 nationally and 10 in Louisiana since 1973 (when the U.S. Supreme Court imposed a moratorium on the death penalty and then lifted it three years later), according to the Death Penalty Information Center. Last October, a man was released just days before his death, also from Louisiana’s Angola prison, after spending decades in solitary confinement for a false conviction in a racially charged murder case.

A third death row inmate released from the same Angola prison after being falsely convicted of capital murder testified last month before a Senate committee on the inhumane conditions of solitary confinement on Angola’s death row. “Fairly early during my confinement at Angola, I very seriously considered giving up my legal rights and letting the State execute me,” he said. “No one, no matter how horrible the crimes for which they have been convicted, can endure this lack of stimulation, contact, and activity for very long.”


http://thinkprogress.org/...

by on Mar. 13, 2014 at 3:12 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
billsfan1104
by Jules on Mar. 13, 2014 at 7:03 AM
3 moms liked this
I read about this, and this was fucked up from the beginning. I hope he gets to sue and get lots of money.
I feel for his family, him and also the family of the victim.
Seasidegirl
by Gold Member on Mar. 13, 2014 at 8:46 AM
5 moms liked this

It breaks my heart when I see/read these stories. I cannot imagine ... Then imagine the people who have been executed :(   :(  

lga1965
by on Mar. 13, 2014 at 9:39 AM

 Louisiana....somebody needs to send those "lawmakers" back to school in another area of America where people actually use their heads for more than a shelf for their hairdos.

This is horrible. He lost 30 years of his life because some racist woman lied about him. And they jailed him anyway.

....sigh.

Ryanswifey42012
by Member on Mar. 13, 2014 at 9:47 AM
Wow. They didn't even have enough evidence to convict him but did anyway
pamelax3
by Gold Member on Mar. 13, 2014 at 10:30 AM
2 moms liked this

Very sad, I am glad he has been released and hopefully it will bring a light to others that may be innocent.

MsDenuninani
by Silver Member on Mar. 13, 2014 at 11:50 AM
4 moms liked this

I'm not morally opposed to the death penalty.

But cases like these make me against it nonetheless.  We really have no business killing people when we know damn straight that so many are not getting a fair trial.

jllcali
by Jane on Mar. 13, 2014 at 12:26 PM
1 mom liked this
Glad he was exonerated. It is a travesty of justice he was convicted.

Fingerprint evidence is not as foolproof as many think it is. The adage of "no two fingerprints are alike" is based in anecdotal assumption from over 100 years ago. There is not enough scientific data to determine how unique individual fingerprints are.
Goodwoman614
by Satan on Mar. 13, 2014 at 1:27 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting MsDenuninani:

I'm not morally opposed to the death penalty.

But cases like these make me against it nonetheless.  We really have no business killing people when we know damn straight that so many are not getting a fair trial.

Exactly. Even if one theoretically is supportive of the death penalty, its application is just too fraught. Impossibly so, if taking someone's life for a crime they didn't commit is even a possibility. 

Perhaps the only time, then, where it wouldn't be problematic would be in instances where the person confessed, and then stuck to their confession.

That still leaves the issue of cost. 

survivorinohio
by René on Mar. 13, 2014 at 1:37 PM

I read about this somewhere else.  I am really glad he got out but there isnt any real way to undo what has been done to him:(

dawnie1
by #1 Raider fan on Mar. 13, 2014 at 3:29 PM

30 years....and he's still sane. I can not fathom. It makes me rather ill feeling.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)