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Fox Host Says Poor Neighborhoods Stink, Deserve Gentrification

Posted by on Apr. 3, 2014 at 1:44 AM
  • 38 Replies
1 mom liked this

Tom Shillue, a “comedian” who filled in for Greg Gutfeld on Fox News’ Red Eye, stated that gentrification is a good thing because it takes “rutty” neighborhoods with places that “reek,” and transform them into higher-end, corporate businesses.

A rule in comedy is that you never punch down.  Mr. Shillue was attacking low-income neighborhoods, people who are historically disadvantaged when going up against the wealthy, and pushing for big business to do a complete takeover.

The comments were in regard to a book called “Store Front,” which took photos of dive-bars, mom and pop shops and other businesses that gave a community character but were rapidly disappearing.  The photographers then went back and showed what those businesses had become.  For example, CBGB became a John Varvatos clothing store, 2nd Ave Deli became a Chase Bank, and Casa Nova Pizzeria became a Verizon Wireless store.

“This thing with the gentrification, I’ve been hearing about this my whole life, you saw those pictures, those old places looked ratty and they stunk,” Shillue told the panel. “Now, they made room for the new… Wouldn’t these mom & pop stores be around if these whiners would go buy the mom & pop merchandise?”

Later, Shillue went on to say,

“Isn’t it telling that the people who are against this kind gentrification, the ones who don’t want any change are often people on the left?” Shillue asked. “But right-wing people, who are supposed to be conservative — like, you know, they are resistant to change — we are the ones who are saying, let it change!”

In moderation, gentrification can be a good thing for a neighborhood.  However, when big business strong-arms and cash-whips smaller businesses, and a neighborhood loses all of its character, something is inherently lost.  What’s more, if all of the lower-income neighborhoods suddenly become upscale shopping centers, where do those who can no longer afford their rent go?  Gentrification causes rent to skyrocket, effectively pushing the poor into condensed ghettos that are “out of sight, out of mind.”

There is a serious discussion to be had about gentrification in communities around the country.  However, speaking as if the debate is over and businesses should have free-reign to take over is the wrong way to go about it.

Watch Tom Shillue on Fox News’ Red Eye.

by on Apr. 3, 2014 at 1:44 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Carpy
by Emerald Member on Apr. 3, 2014 at 5:38 AM

Improving neighborhoods is a bad thing?

idunno1234
by Platinum Member on Apr. 3, 2014 at 6:28 AM

 No.... but pricing people out of them is.

This is one of those issues that there is really no easy answer to.

Quoting Carpy:

Improving neighborhoods is a bad thing?


stormcris
by Christy on Apr. 3, 2014 at 7:04 AM
3 moms liked this

Let's face it, many people wish certain segments of society would disappear.

Mommabearbergh
by on Apr. 3, 2014 at 7:17 AM
Cbgbs was historical to me but I will agree if you take out places it makes it lose some character but as generations go people will forget it was ever there. Prime example west Boston most people in my age group don't even know it existed and that was a whole section. Most of it was sold to developers and they pretty much bulldozed the community. It wasn't pretty but it had its place. Putting these stores in certain neighborhood and after a whole all neighborhoods look like that it will start looking like pleasantville. Gentrification isn't always a good thing. More communities need to put more time into their area
tanyainmizzou
by on Apr. 3, 2014 at 8:08 AM
1 mom liked this

Perhaps people should support these local businesses and then they aren't getting bought out as easily.

Della529
by on Apr. 3, 2014 at 8:14 AM
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As the former owner of MANY, MANY properties in historically urban areas, it is my experience that some corporations AND politicans hurt gentrification of these core areas.

But hey! That guy saw some before and after photos, so he is now an expert, lol.

jcrew6
by Platinum Member on Apr. 3, 2014 at 8:51 AM
1 mom liked this

To watch Red Eye, one must not be so serious. It's a satirical talk show.  This is a show notorious for sarcasm, comedy, comedians, etc. 

sweet-a-kins
by Emerald Member on Apr. 3, 2014 at 10:00 AM
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 Remember poor folks

just STOP being poor!

like DUH

supermonstermom
by on Apr. 3, 2014 at 10:08 AM
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Wow. What. A rude comment.

In the poorer neighborhoods bringing in companies brings in much needed jobs and opportunities for the resident and would bring in higher property taxes.

it seems that everytime someone tries to come up with idea to bring in jobs and help communities help themselves it is meet with resistance. When I drive through the poor side of town over two thirds of the commercial real estate is sitting empty. How is that a good thing?

How is it a bad thing to try to improve blighted neighborhoods by trying to create jobs and opportunities?
meriana
by Platinum Member on Apr. 3, 2014 at 11:13 AM
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Quoting supermonstermom: Wow. What. A rude comment. In the poorer neighborhoods bringing in companies brings in much needed jobs and opportunities for the resident and would bring in higher property taxes. it seems that everytime someone tries to come up with idea to bring in jobs and help communities help themselves it is meet with resistance. When I drive through the poor side of town over two thirds of the commercial real estate is sitting empty. How is that a good thing? How is it a bad thing to try to improve blighted neighborhoods by trying to create jobs and opportunities?

Helping communities to improve is not a bad thing. The problem is that when large corporations move in, they tend to do things like get rid of existing businesses and homes in favor of higher end stores, apts and housing developments. Those living in poorer areas often cannot afford to shop at those businesses, or pay the higher price of the apts and homes so they are forced out. It doesn't help to provide job opportunities if the wages are low, which retail wages typically are,  and the cost of housing,  property taxes are  such that existing residents can't afford to live there any longer even if they are hired by those companies.

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