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Women are not here for your entertainment

Posted by on Apr. 7, 2014 at 12:10 PM
  • 61 Replies
2 moms liked this

Artist: Catcalling is not OK

By Emanuella Grinberg, CNN

updated 7:28 PM EDT, Sun April 6, 2014

(CNN) -- Tatyana Fazlalizadeh had never heard of the term "street harassment" until two years ago. Before then, she simply considered the hisses and catcalls from strangers in the street an "annoying part of everyday life" that came with being a female.

Now, street harassment is the focus of an ongoing street art project led by Fazlalizadeh that's drawing global attention. This weekend, people from the United States to Australia plastered communities with portraits of women from Fazlalizadeh's "Stop Telling Women to Smile" art series.

Named for a self-portrait of Fazlalizadeh with the message "Stop Telling Women to Smile," the formidable portraits include sentiments meant to deter street harassment. One piece tells viewers, "You can keep your thoughts on my body to yourself"; another reads "Women don't owe you anything."

Fazlalizadeh has spent the past year and a half traveling the country speaking to women and creating new posters based on their experiences of gender-based street harassment.

Her initial goal was to find out how women experience street harassment differently depending on where they live. Women in car-dependent cities described getting calls from men in cars. In cities like New York, Washington and Chicago, women are groped or leered at on public transportation. What seems to be universal is the impact, she said. It leaves women feeling vulnerable and unsafe in their communities, as if their sole purpose in leaving the house each day is to entertain men. It makes women think twice about what they wear, the routes they take, even their body language.

"The way that it affects women and things they go through have pretty much the same theme: Women are out for consumption and for your enjoyment," Fazlalizadeh told CNN. "It creates a sexually hostile climate in our streets and communities."

Since she started out papering the streets of Brooklyn in 2012, Fazlalizadeh has forged partnerships with community-based nonprofits and advocacy groups to create and share her work. This also means getting permission from property owners to post her work on walls or in public spaces, which she encouraged people who participated in Friday's global poster-pasting night to do.

Fazlalizadeh spent the week in Atlanta meeting with students, artists and supporters of her work. In a talk at Georgia State University on Wednesday, she told a standing room only audience of men and women that while she's received mostly positive feedback, people sometimes express their contempt for the project's message by scribbling derogatory words and phrases on her posters. Other times, she sees people use the posters to engage in dialogue, like a real-world message board.

That's great, she says, because that's what they project aims to do: inspire discussion and hopefully collaboration among the sexes.

Occasionally, a well-meaning man asks her in person about the idea of intention: What if he doesn't intend to harass or make a women feel uncomfortable, he just wants to compliment her in the hopes of getting her attention? Surely, that's not harassment.

 

Fazlalizadeh understands where he's coming from, and she respects him for engaging her in discussion, she said. But what matters is how it makes the woman feel, she said.

"That's where all I can say is, 'I'm sorry, I don't agree with you,'" she said, prompting laughter from the audience.

"That's where social norms and taking cues are important," she said. "But the main goal is to make us rethink what's considered normal and acceptable treatment of women."

 *some pictures are at the link

 http://www.cnn.com/2014/04/06/living/street-harassment-art/index.html?hpt=hp_bn11

by on Apr. 7, 2014 at 12:10 PM
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Replies (1-10):
themissheather
by Member on Apr. 7, 2014 at 12:19 PM
1 mom liked this

I've seen her work, but didn't know that she was expanding past NYC. I think her message is fantastic and I really support this. It's another step in the right direction of ending the hypersexualization of women.

punky3175
by Punky on Apr. 7, 2014 at 1:06 PM

BUMP!

FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Apr. 7, 2014 at 1:07 PM

I'v never heard of her or her work.

Something new to look in to.

Good for her!

RaisinGirl78
by Member on Apr. 7, 2014 at 1:12 PM
I've heard cars that make that cat call whistle sound with their car alarms. I'm glad she's exposing this kind of harassment.
paganbaby
by Teflon Don on Apr. 7, 2014 at 1:13 PM

I've only ever gotten whistles and the occasional, "He baby!" from guys in cars. It's never really bothered me.

lizmarie1975
by Gold Member on Apr. 7, 2014 at 1:14 PM

Street harrassment is one of those things that I don't miss since moving to the suburbs.

MeAndTommyLee
by Gold Member on Apr. 7, 2014 at 1:29 PM
I ignore them, and make no eye contact. The only time I'd get angry is when I was pregnant! Oddly that happened a lot and while I had another one of our kids in the stroller.
My sons do not like it one bit. They'll tell DH when we get home.

Quoting paganbaby:

I've only ever gotten whistles and the occasional, "He baby!" from guys in cars. It's never really bothered me.

paganbaby
by Teflon Don on Apr. 7, 2014 at 1:32 PM

You got hit on when you were pregnant?? LOL I'm sorry for laughing. I felt like a cow when I was pregnant,lol.

My mom was mistaken for a prositute when she was walking my 2yo sister once. Men are idiots.

Quoting MeAndTommyLee: I ignore them, and make no eye contact. The only time I'd get angry is when I was pregnant! Oddly that happened a lot and while I had another one of our kids in the stroller. My sons do not like it one bit. They'll tell DH when we get home.
Quoting paganbaby:

I've only ever gotten whistles and the occasional, "He baby!" from guys in cars. It's never really bothered me.




I will not have a temper tantrum nor stomp across the floor.


I will not pout, scream or shout or kick against the door.

I will not throw my food around nor pick upon another.

I’ll always try to be real good because I am the mother.

I am the mother.

I am the mother.














Donna6503
by Platinum Member on Apr. 7, 2014 at 1:33 PM
Bump
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
MeAndTommyLee
by Gold Member on Apr. 7, 2014 at 1:42 PM
Yeah! I'd look down at my own belly! Really? It made me angry.
We are bike riders. Last summer some kid followed me in his car, pulled over and hit on me as I locked my bike up to go into a roadside store! I said, "young man..I am old enough to be your mother. You are being very rude, and you have a filthy mouth." He apologized profusely.

Quoting paganbaby:

You got hit on when you were pregnant?? LOL I'm sorry for laughing. I felt like a cow when I was pregnant,lol.

My mom was mistaken for a prositute when she was walking my 2yo sister once. Men are idiots.

Quoting MeAndTommyLee: I ignore them, and make no eye contact. The only time I'd get angry is when I was pregnant! Oddly that happened a lot and while I had another one of our kids in the stroller.
My sons do not like it one bit. They'll tell DH when we get home.

Quoting paganbaby:

I've only ever gotten whistles and the occasional, "He baby!" from guys in cars. It's never really bothered me.

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