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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Undocumented children arrive in Arizona in DHS bid to relieve crowding

Posted by on Jun. 16, 2014 at 2:42 AM
  • 65 Replies
http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/08/us/arizona-dhs-undocumented-children-moved/

More undocumented children arrive in Arizona in DHS bid to relieve crowding

By Nick Valencia, CNN

updated 4:55 PM EDT, Mon June 9, 2014

(CNN) -- More than 100 undocumented children without families were expected to arrive in Arizona from south Texas on Sunday as part of a federal transport of underage immigrants to the state by the Department of Homeland Security, a spokesman said.

Last week, nearly 1,000 "unaccompanied alien children" had already arrived in Tucson and Phoenix from places like McAllen and El Paso, Texas, as part of a resettlement process of the minors, most of whom come from Central America, to their native countries.

Unlike a Mexican immigrant who arrives to the United States, a Central American immigrant cannot be processed as quickly because of proximity to their native country. Homeland Security is prohibited from immediately deporting the children if they are not from Canada or Mexico, causing the backlog of immigrants in U.S. detention centers.

Facilities in Texas were at or near capacity for the immigrants because of a "record increase in underage migrants," which led to the transfer of hundreds to Arizona, a spokesman said.

Crisis immigration centers under fire

Although children crossing the border alone has long been an issue, the recent spike could be attributed to better weather or worsening economic conditions in their home countries, officials said. Others simply want to be reunited with their parents, who may have left them with relatives in their native countries.

Separate from unaccompanied children being sent to the state, family groups were also being sent by the federal government to Arizona, a process that has outraged Arizona lawmakers, including Gov. Jan Brewer. She released a statement Friday saying that DHS was transporting "thousands of illegal aliens and releasing them at bus stations in Tucson and Phoenix."

"I am disturbed and outraged that President Obama's administration continues to implement this dangerous and inhumane policy, meanwhile neglecting to answer crucial questions our citizens demand and deserve," Brewer wrote.

"Not only does the federal government have no plan to stop this disgraceful policy, it also has no plan to deal with the endless waves of illegal aliens once they are released here," Brewer added.

As of late last week, Immigration and Customs Enforcement was no longer releasing "large family groups" at the bus stops in Arizona, a DHS spokesman said, but children under age 17 are continuing to be transferred to the state.

"The situation with the kids are they came by themselves, they have no relatives here, and the consulates can't keep up. They're in limbo. There's no one (back home) to deport them to," a DHS spokesman told CNN.

Raising a larger humanitarian concern are the conditions to which the immigrant children are arriving.

A facility in Nogales, Arizona, with capacity for about 1,500, does not have enough food or beds to accommodate the current demand, a spokesman said.

There are currently no showers for the immigrants, either, but those were expected to be in place by Tuesday, according to a spokesman.

"The Nogales processing center is equipped and used for processing apprehended individuals. The Tucson Sector has secured additional services such as a Health and Human Services medical screening area, additional bedding, shower areas and laundry facilities. Vendors have been contracted to provide nutritional meals, FEMA will be providing counseling services and recreational activities," U.S. Customs and Border Protection said in a statement.

"Upon completion of CBP processing...custody determinations will be made on a case-by-case basis," the statement said.

The record spike in migrants coming from Central America and crossing into the United States via Mexico is not expected to slow down, a spokesman told CNN.

More than 60,000 unaccompanied juveniles are expected to cross in 2014, said Chris Cabrera, vice president of the National Border Patrol Council in the Rio Grande Valley, a U.S. Border Patrol workers union.

"We are seeing numbers that we've never seen before in this part of the country," Cabrera told CNN last month. "Yesterday, we had 60 minors in one station alone. You're talking kids from 17 years old, on down to some that are 5 or 6 years old, traveling by themselves."

Last year, roughly 10% of people caught by Border Patrol agents were minors, according to a Border Patrol official.

by on Jun. 16, 2014 at 2:42 AM
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Replies (1-10):
LauraKW
by "Dude!" on Jun. 16, 2014 at 7:28 AM
2 moms liked this
If this many children are crossing into the US it makes me wonder how many are not making it?
UpSheRises
by Platinum Member on Jun. 16, 2014 at 7:49 AM

I heard that when these kids go in front of the immigration judge they don't get representation because they aren't citizens. Children as young a 5yo have to make their own case to a judge about why they should be able to stay.

I really hope i misunderstood what i heard because if that is true it's shameful.

VooDooB
by Platinum Member on Jun. 16, 2014 at 8:19 AM
2 moms liked this

How are they even getting across? Why haven't we closed the hole yet?

Quoting LauraKW: If this many children are crossing into the US it makes me wonder how many are not making it?


supermonstermom
by on Jun. 16, 2014 at 8:43 AM
1 mom liked this

We can't send them back to their contries?  But we can put them on buses and release them in US cities?

These kids have no families in the countries where they came from?  No parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles?

I bet if we took them to the countries embassies they came from the embassies would find their families or someone in their home countries to send them back to.

We are talking out both sides of our mouth on this issue..  "its not safe to send your kids to the US, there is no reward for you.."  "but if you make it, you will be released into a US city, you will get services and  you will be able to stay.."  

VooDooB
by Platinum Member on Jun. 16, 2014 at 9:31 AM

They just said on my local news that police have spent more time making sandwiches then out patrolling these last couple weeks.

MeAndTommyLee
by Platinum Member on Jun. 16, 2014 at 10:00 AM
3 moms liked this

These kids have families back home.  Their parents are sending them purposely in an attempt to latch on to the US.  As if we don't have enough problems taking care of American citizens in need.  What the hell are we supposed to do with all these kids?  Were to support them?  I guess all of these kids have the same mother -- America.  

MeAndTommyLee
by Platinum Member on Jun. 16, 2014 at 10:03 AM
1 mom liked this

That's bullshit.  I did hear this morning on the local news that these kids are not eligible for the 'Dream Act' which many of their parents back home believe they are.  Isint it amusing how these people from their countries make it a point to try and understand all things -- including legal loopholes in America and nothing else?  This is pitiful. 

Quoting VooDooB:

They just said on my local news that police have spent more time making sandwiches then out patrolling these last couple weeks.


VooDooB
by Platinum Member on Jun. 16, 2014 at 10:04 AM

Nevermind I just found this paragraph in a CNN article:


Many of the immigrants use rafts to cross the Rio Grande, equipped with instructions to follow the river until reaching the Border Patrol site to surrender.

"They know that once they get to the station, we are going to give them paperwork and we are going to set them free into the United States," Cabrera says.


Quoting VooDooB:

How are they even getting across? Why haven't we closed the hole yet?

Quoting LauraKW: If this many children are crossing into the US it makes me wonder how many are not making it?


meriana
by Platinum Member on Jun. 16, 2014 at 12:38 PM

Regardless of whether or not they'd be eligible for the "Dream Act", what in the world are we supposed to do with them? If they were eligible that still means we'd (all taxpayers) have to pay for their care and support until adulthood. Many if not all of these kids are told what to say in order to be allowed to stay in this country and one of the acceptable reasons apparently is an abusive home situation (read that somwhere), something easy to claim but it's difficult to prove it's not the case.

Don't know about other states but here if they're here for, I think, 3 years and graduate from a high school here, they can apply for need based Financial Aide for college. A lot of those here illegally and their advocates want them to be able to apply for Federal Grants too, all without any requirement as to citizenship.


LauraKW
by "Dude!" on Jun. 16, 2014 at 12:43 PM
I don't think "a" hole is the issue (that sounds like a little kid trying not to cuss). If children can get from Guatemala or Panama to the US border I don't think one river is going to stop them.

Did I get my Central American countries right ? Geography is not my forte.


Quoting VooDooB:

How are they even getting across? Why haven't we closed the hole yet?

Quoting LauraKW: If this many children are crossing into the US it makes me wonder how many are not making it?

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