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What does the word "honor" mean to you?

Posted by on Jun. 29, 2014 at 1:51 AM
  • 7 Replies

I read an interesting reply today, from an interview with fantasy author Elizabeth Moon, and it brought to mind the recent stories about honor killings.   We've posters in this group from several countries and subcultures.

What does the word "honor" mean to you?


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 5. Honor is a word that I see show up often in this series. Kieri talks of it when thinking of Paks ordeal, Dorrin talks of it when making a decision about the found jewels. Even the Elven folk refer to it. Yet it is not a word heard a great deal in our own world. Why is it so important to these people?

It’s important to me and thus it’s important in the books…I choose to write about people and cultures in which the concept of honor has relevance.    On the practical side,  a concept of honor brings with it a number of intriguing complications.  Not everyone agrees on what honor is, for one thing, leading to intercultural misunderstandings.  Decisions involving honor also bring in other virtues–the foundation virtue of courage, without which no one can stick to any other virtuous course–and judgment, without which no one can discern what is right or honorable in a situation.

by on Jun. 29, 2014 at 1:51 AM
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Replies (1-7):
Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Jun. 29, 2014 at 1:52 AM
honor (n.) Look up honor at Dictionary.com
c.1200, "glory, renown, fame earned," from Anglo-French honour, Old French honor (Modern French honneur), from Latin honorem(nominative honos, later honor) "honor, dignity, office, reputation," of unknown origin. Till 17c., honour and honor were equally frequent; the former now preferred in England, the latter in U.S. by influence of Noah Webster's spelling reforms. Meaning "a woman's chastity" first attested late 14c. Honors "distinction in scholarship" attested by 1782. Honor roll in the scholastic sense attested by 1872. To do the honors (1650s) originally meant the customary civilities and courtesies at a public entertainment, etc.
honor (v.) Look up honor at Dictionary.com
mid-13c., honuren, "to do honor to," from Old French honorer, from Latin honorare, from honor (see honor (n.)). In the commercial sense of "accept a bill due, etc.," it is recorded from 1706. Related: Honoredhonoring.
A custom more honoured in the breach than the observance. Whoever will look up the passage (Hamlet I. iv. 16) will see that it means, beyond a doubt, a custom that one deserves more honour for breaking than for keeping: but it is often quoted in the wrong & very different sense of a dead letter or rule more often broken than kept. [Fowler]
turtle68
by Mahinaarangi on Jun. 29, 2014 at 1:59 AM

To remember with reverance

dawnie1
by #1 Raider fan on Jun. 29, 2014 at 8:52 AM

"To do proud" in the parlance of the south. To continue the line or tradition in a just way.

AdrianneHill
by Ruby Member on Jun. 29, 2014 at 8:56 AM
1 mom liked this
Always doing the right thing, even when it sucks and even if you aren't terribly willing. And a gentleman says what he means and means what he says.
survivorinohio
by René on Jun. 29, 2014 at 9:02 AM

This is my favorite quote on honor (honour).

How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


idunno1234
by Platinum Member on Jun. 29, 2014 at 9:34 AM
Honor is yet another one of those positive human attributes,the best of what we can be, something we should all strive for, that too often gets all twisted and perverted by those who tie it into their own ego and focus on the opposite of honor- shame of what others who don't live up to certain expectations bring on family members.

And that was one hell of a long awkward sentence, lol.
Euphoric
by Bazinga! on Jun. 29, 2014 at 10:01 AM

Pretty much this

Quoting AdrianneHill: Always doing the right thing, even when it sucks and even if you aren't terribly willing. And a gentleman says what he means and means what he says.


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