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San Diego strippers sue the city

Posted by on Jul. 22, 2014 at 5:46 PM
  • 18 Replies


Quote:

San Diego strippers sue city, cops; say club inspection turned into photo peep show: lawsuit 

Dancers at a Cheetahs Gentlemen's Club in San Diego said a March inspection on their club went too far, with officers corralling strippers in a locker and taking racy pics of them. Police said the legal inspection was to make sure the strippers had their city-issued licenses.

 
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
 
Friday, July 18, 2014, 2:38 PM
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Brittany Murphy, one of the strippers, said she felt violated after the March 6 inspection.FOX5SANDIEGO.COMBrittany Murphy, one of the strippers, said she felt violated after the March 6 inspection.

Strippers in Southern California are suing the city after they said a squad of vice cops went over the line during an inspection of their club, corralling them in a locker room for hours and snapping "nearly nude" pics of them.

Dancers at the Cheetahs Gentlemen's Club in San Diego said local police crossed the line when around a dozen body-armor clad officers stormed their club in March for an unannounced inspection, according to reports

Strippers in San Diego must carry city-issued licenses.

Cops have the authority to check those licenses at any time and don't have to let the club know beforehand, authorities said.

One dancer, Brittany Murphy, said the March 6 license check was more like an impromptu peep-show, with cops snapping R-rated pics they said were meant to document the girls' tattoos.

Cheetahs Gentlemen's Club in San Diego. Local police held an inspection there to check the strippers' city-issued licenses.FOX5SANDIEGO.COMCheetahs Gentlemen's Club in San Diego. Local police held an inspection there to check the strippers' city-issued licenses.

"I was wearing a sheer one-piece type thing and the flashes were going and they could definitely see stuff, so that's kind of uncomfortable," Murphy told NBC San Diego.

"I mean, I am a stripper but…" she said, trailing off, before adding that she and many of the other girls "felt very violated."

The lawsuit, filed in San Diego Superior Court Wednesday, also said the girls were made to "expose body" parts that were otherwise covered up so cops could photograph them.

The suit also claimed the cops made "demeaning remarks" and didn't allow them to leave the club for two hours.

The inspection was filmed by the club's security cameras.The inspection was filmed by the club's security cameras.
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  • Thirty San Diego-area strippers filed a lawsuit Wednesday against the city and its police chief, claiming they were detained and photographed nude or nearly nude against their will during licensing inspections, news reports say.  Cheetahs Gentlemen's Club.
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  • Thirty San Diego-area strippers filed a lawsuit Wednesday against the city and its police chief, claiming they were detained and photographed nude or nearly nude against their will during licensing inspections, news reports say.  Cheetahs Gentlemen's Club.
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FOX5SANDIEGO.COM

The club was open during the raid, and some of the scantily-clad women were waiting to go on stage.

Dan Gilleon, who is representing the strippers and the club, accused the police of violating the women's Fourth Amendment rights of unreasonable search and seizure.

"They crossed [the line], went in there and held them against their will and forced them to pose for photographs," Gilleon told the station.

The suit names both the city and San Diego and the chief of police as defendants.

Strippers Sue Cops Claiming Abuse During Inspection

 

Thirty women who claim they were mistreated by police during inspections of two strip clubs in Kearny Mesa sued the city of San Diego and police Chief Shelley...

 

San Diego police said the officers did nothing wrong.

Cops have a right to check identity cards, and taking photos was an important part of verifying the dancers' identities.

"The San Diego code mandates we make these inspections," police spokesman Lt. Kevin Mayer told the Los Angeles Times. "This is not a criminal matter, this is a regulatory matter."

The lawsuit was seeking an unspecified amount of money in damages.

I can't stop giggling.

by on Jul. 22, 2014 at 5:46 PM
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Replies (1-10):
PinkButterfly66
by Gold Member on Jul. 22, 2014 at 5:49 PM

Drivers licenses aren't official identification?  

FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Jul. 22, 2014 at 5:49 PM


Quoting PinkButterfly66:

Drivers licenses aren't official identification?  

Not in the case of being a stripper.

PinkButterfly66
by Gold Member on Jul. 22, 2014 at 6:20 PM
2 moms liked this

r-i-g-h-t, because strippers don't have the same civil rights.  

Quoting FromAtoZ:

Quoting PinkButterfly66:

Drivers licenses aren't official identification?  

Not in the case of being a stripper.


momtimesx4
by Silver Member on Jul. 22, 2014 at 6:22 PM

 This....name and pic has to match and by name I mean the stage name.  Real important to be able to tell Candi from Savanah and although Electra and Epiphany like to do the twin routine, there are subtle differences between the two.

Quoting FromAtoZ:

Quoting PinkButterfly66:

Drivers licenses aren't official identification?  

Not in the case of being a stripper.

 

candlegal
by Judy on Jul. 22, 2014 at 6:39 PM
haha at strippers feeling violated.maybe they should find another occupation. Easy money
FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Jul. 22, 2014 at 7:42 PM


Quoting PinkButterfly66:

r-i-g-h-t, because strippers don't have the same civil rights.  

Quoting FromAtoZ:

Quoting PinkButterfly66:

Drivers licenses aren't official identification?  

Not in the case of being a stripper.

Where does it say they do not?

It's common knowledge, and the law, that they have to a license for their profession.  It is also the law that they can be asked to show that license at any given time, without warning.  

If the police acted in a manner that was not following procedure, it will be determined and they should be dealt with.

To say they felt violated because they didn't have a lot of clothes on at the time.....................I don't know any one who would expect a stripper to have a lot of clothing on while at work. 

PinkButterfly66
by Gold Member on Jul. 22, 2014 at 7:46 PM

License to work is different.  Driver's license is still legal identification.  A license to work simply means you paid the licensing fee.

Quoting FromAtoZ:

Quoting PinkButterfly66:

r-i-g-h-t, because strippers don't have the same civil rights.  

Quoting FromAtoZ:

Quoting PinkButterfly66:

Drivers licenses aren't official identification?  

Not in the case of being a stripper.

Where does it say they do not?

It's common knowledge, and the law, that they have to a license for their profession.  It is also the law that they can be asked to show that license at any given time, without warning.  

If the police acted in a manner that was not following procedure, it will be determined and they should be dealt with.

To say they felt violated because they didn't have a lot of clothes on at the time.....................I don't know any one who would expect a stripper to have a lot of clothing on while at work. 


Mrs.Kubalabuku
by Bronze Member on Jul. 22, 2014 at 7:46 PM
2 moms liked this

I think if their allegations are true, they have a valid point.

They choose what to show when on stage.  They choose the environment and manner in which it is exposed.  Strippers actually have a lot of control over their body on stage and what can be done/seen with it.

Many strippers don't just sit around naked backstage.  They wear robes or put on clothes.  People have this illusion that strippers have no privacy or privelleges, but that isn't the case for many.

It's like you're saying, so long as the cops think you're already being sexy, they have a right to take whatever pics they want.

FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Jul. 22, 2014 at 7:48 PM


Quoting PinkButterfly66:

License to work is different.  Driver's license is still legal identification.  A license to work simply means you paid the licensing fee.

Quoting FromAtoZ:

Quoting PinkButterfly66:

r-i-g-h-t, because strippers don't have the same civil rights.  

Quoting FromAtoZ:

Quoting PinkButterfly66:

Drivers licenses aren't official identification?  

Not in the case of being a stripper.

Where does it say they do not?

It's common knowledge, and the law, that they have to a license for their profession.  It is also the law that they can be asked to show that license at any given time, without warning.  

If the police acted in a manner that was not following procedure, it will be determined and they should be dealt with.

To say they felt violated because they didn't have a lot of clothes on at the time.....................I don't know any one who would expect a stripper to have a lot of clothing on while at work. 

They are to show their license upon demand.  I'm not seeing the big deal here.  You want to strip, follow the laws and go on about your business.

FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Jul. 22, 2014 at 7:50 PM


Quoting Mrs.Kubalabuku:

I think if their allegations are true, they have a valid point.

They choose what to show when on stage.  They choose the environment and manner in which it is exposed.  Strippers actually have a lot of control over their body on stage and what can be done/seen with it.

Many strippers don't just sit around naked backstage.  They wear robes or put on clothes.  People have this illusion that strippers have no privacy or privelleges, but that isn't the case for many.

It's like you're saying, so long as the cops think you're already being sexy, they have a right to take whatever pics they want.

If the police demanded such photos for the purpose of nothing more than taking the photos, I completely agree with you.

If that is the case, they damn well should be reprimanded.

I admit, when it comes to strippers, I do tend to not hold a lot of respect for their choice of employment but it is their choice to make.  

If laws were not broken here and all was it was supposed to be, they should lose.  Otherwise, they should indeed win.

Time will tell.

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