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Should employers accommodate the disabled?

Posted by on Jul. 25, 2014 at 11:31 AM
  • 53 Replies

Change job parameters, add equipment  (dollies, carts, seating etc)?

Make allowances for extra sick days, be tolerant of the employee when they are not functioning at the top of their game ?

Is todays job market a place where these special needs employees are eligible?



How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


by on Jul. 25, 2014 at 11:31 AM
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Replies (1-10):
coolmommy2x
by Gold Member on Jul. 25, 2014 at 11:59 AM
I think it should be determined on an individual basis. If an employee is that valuable to a company (does an outstanding job, would be hard to replace, etc), why not try to make accommodations to keep that person? It's cheaper (in time and cost) to keep an employee rather than replace.

By the same token, companies need to be mindful of people who would take advantage of accommodations made. There is an episode of "Seinfeld" where George let's his new boss think he's handicapped and takes full advantage of the perks they give him as a result.
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KenneMaw
by Bronze Member on Jul. 25, 2014 at 12:03 PM
5 moms liked this

Companies with a certain # of employees must make accomodations, it is called the Americans with Disability Act.  

EireLass
by Ruby Member on Jul. 25, 2014 at 12:27 PM
1 mom liked this

If they are a valuable employee, yes. 

My daughter isn't disabled, but suffers greatly from migraines (I don't even get regular headaches, so I've never had the experience). She has always let her employers know about this, and they've always excused her absenses without suspicion. (Same with school, college, etc). 

candlegal
by Judy on Jul. 25, 2014 at 12:38 PM
Not to the point of the company going broke
4evrinbluejeans
by KK on Jul. 25, 2014 at 12:41 PM
1 mom liked this

I think reasonable accomodation is reasonable.  The rules in place already allow for job restructuring in order to acccomodate an individuals limitations.  

I don't agree that an employer should be required to allow extra time off beyond what is given within the parameters of employment and the current law.  There are already rules in place to prevent an employer from firing a person with disabilities who takes off more time without pay than is generally allowed within company policy.  


..MoonShine..
by Redwood Witch on Jul. 25, 2014 at 12:45 PM
1 mom liked this
This. Reasonable accommodations. Allowing excessive absenteeism is not reasonable, IMO. Yes...sometimes having additional equipment available is reasonable accommodation.

Quoting KenneMaw:

Companies with a certain # of employees must make accomodations, it is called the Americans with Disability Act.  

romalove
by Roma on Jul. 25, 2014 at 12:49 PM
3 moms liked this

Some things are reasonable, some are not.

Asking for "more" sick days than others get is not.

Expecting bathrooms that are accessible, desks and chairs that work with the disability (larger spaces, for example, or highered or lowered workspaces) yes.

Sometimes the disability will not pair with the job no matter what you do.  Would you hire someone who's blind to do makeovers?  Is there an accommodation that could be made?  I would say no.  Can you hire someone without arms to do them?  I would still say no.  Can you hire someone in a wheelchair to do so?  If you can get the chair lifted or the people sitting low enough to make it work, then yes.

Each situation is individual.

FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Jul. 25, 2014 at 12:51 PM
1 mom liked this

This is something we are struggling with at work.

We have 5 special needs employees.  

The job requires you to be quick, multi task and able to finish on time.  To put it simply.

Accommodations are made but at this point, that isn't even helping with a few of them.  Unfortunately they are simply not able to do as is needed to keep the store running efficiently and smoothly.

Patience is wearing thin with other employees and management is frustrated. 

They are such wonderful people, with the exception of one, who simply does not care but has been shuffled over to us and has been employed by the company for 10 years.  It shows.

So while of course accommodations should be made to meet their needs if they cannot meet the needs of the stores, even on a small scale level, they hinder the entire operation overall.

When you have someone's mother calling, claiming she will sue if her son is not allowed to leave an hour prior to his shift ending, it makes for a difficult time, to say the least.

Seasidegirl
by Gold Member on Jul. 25, 2014 at 12:51 PM

Yep, reasonable accomodations.

I know a guy who is legally blind who works at John Hopkins. They have provided him with a super computer screen with special tech that makes the font humongous. This guy does a great job, takes the bus to and from work, is a well-respected and necessary employee. This is how it's supposed to work.

On the flip side, I know someone who likes to blame everyone else for everything wrong in her life. She got a horrid case of herpes when she was young by having sex with this known male slut. I don't understand exactly what happened, but she said the herpes caused other issues that caused a lot of pain.
She ended up suing (successfully) her employer for not accomodating her...issue.

Believe me, I did not even ask. But, knowing her, her issue was that she couldn't get along with anyone at work.

 

LIMom1105
by Bronze Member on Jul. 25, 2014 at 1:22 PM
Exactly. If there are enough employees, it's not a choice.

Quoting KenneMaw:

Companies with a certain # of employees must make accomodations, it is called the Americans with Disability Act.  

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