Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Theodore Wafer Found Guilty Of Second Degree Murder In Renisha McBride Porch Shooting

Posted by on Aug. 7, 2014 at 3:10 PM
  • 101 Replies
2 moms liked this

 

Theodore Wafer Found Guilty Of Second Degree Murder In Renisha McBride Porch Shooting

August 7, 2014 2:50 PM
Theodore Wafer, center, is seen with his attorneys in court on June 27, 2014. (credit: Stephanie Davis/WWJ)

Theodore Wafer, center, is seen with his attorneys in court on June 27, 2014. (credit: Stephanie Davis/WWJ)

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up

DETROIT (WWJ/AP) - A suburban Detroit homeowner who opened his front door and blasted an unarmed 19-year-old woman on his porch has been found guitly of second-degree murder.

The jury returned their verdict against 55-year-old Theodore Wafer after less than two days of deliberation.

Before the verdict was read, Thursday afternoon, the judge told courtroom to contain themselves, warning that outbursts would not be tolerated. no out bursts. "I have no problem locking up entire families," he said.

Wafer never denied shooting Renisha McBride when she showed up drunk on his porch before dawn, but testified that he did so in self-defense after she pounded on his door and tried to break into his Dearborn Heights home on Nov. 2.

McBride, who had an extremely high blood-alcohol level and traces of marijuana in her system, was shot in the face three hours after she walked away from a car crash in Detroit - about a half-mile away from Wafer's home.

Wafer had been sleeping in a recliner and said he couldn't immediately find his phone to call police when he awoke to an "unbelievable" pounding on his doors and feared for his life. He testified that he opened his front door and noticed the screen door had been tampered with, then opened the front door further before a figure emerged quickly from the side of the house. He said he raised his shotgun and fired.

"There was no pointing," Wafer said during cross-examination. "Just a self-defense reaction to protect myself."

The shot hit McBride in the face, killing her instantly.

Prosecutors in their closing arguments repeatedly emphasized that Wafer had easier options than to directly confront McBride.

"She was a young girl looking for help," prosecutor Patrick Muscat told jurors. "What he did had to be immediately necessary and it wasn't. It was reckless. It was negligent. I don't know how to describe it. It was horrific.

"How about shutting the door? ... How about calling 911?" Muscat said. "No, what he does is he engages. He creates the confrontation."

Muscat said Wafer shot McBride because he was upset and wanted a confrontation when she knocked on his door at 4:30 a.m. He said Wafer's Mossberg 12 gauge shotgun with a pistol-grip handle "is a dangerous weapon, and the way he handled it - he handled it like a toy....And as a result, a 19-year-old is dead."

But Wafer's attorney Cheryl Carpenter said "fear hijacks the body," arguing that Wafer's actions were reasonable because he feared for his life.

"He armed himself. He was getting attacked," Carpenter said in her closing argument. "Put yourselves in his shoes at 4:30 in the morning."

Another prosecutor, Athina Siringas, said a murder conviction fits the case. Wafer "decided to be judge, jury and executioner," she said in a rebuttal argument.

Earlier this week, Wafer testified that he was terrified by the pounding on his house.

In the aftermath of the shooting, some wondered whether race was a factor because Wafer is white and McBride was black. Race hasn't been an issue at trial, although the prosecutor noted that McBride was "African-American" while cross-examining Wafer.

In her closing remarks, Carpenter said race isn't a factor for the jury. She said Wafer was just a homeowner who was aware of crime in a neighborhood that borders Detroit and wanted to protect himself.

"In the heat of the moment our instincts are to survive," she said. "He did not know it was a 19-year-old who got in a car crash at 1 a.m. What he knew was someone was trying to get in. It's not for a good reason - it's to hurt me."

[Continuing Coverage: Renisha McBride Murder Trial]

by on Aug. 7, 2014 at 3:10 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
RandRMomma
by Maya on Aug. 7, 2014 at 4:29 PM
5 moms liked this
I was going to post this but you beat me to the punch. Thankfully, Kym Worthy (Wayne County Prosecutor) isn't a corrupt SOB and seeks justice. I'm glad he was found guilty.
suetoo
by Member on Aug. 7, 2014 at 4:38 PM
1 mom liked this

I don't think I'm glad. A lesser charge was my hope. 

sweet-a-kins
by Emerald Member on Aug. 7, 2014 at 4:40 PM
6 moms liked this

 

Quoting RandRMomma: I was going to post this but you beat me to the punch. Thankfully, Kym Worthy (Wayne County Prosecutor) isn't a corrupt SOB and seeks justice. I'm glad he was found guilty.

I am glad he was convicted

He couldn't find his phone...but he COULD find his SHOTGUN?

OK

 

sweet-a-kins
by Emerald Member on Aug. 7, 2014 at 4:41 PM
3 moms liked this

 I am glad and think the charges were correct

Quoting suetoo:

I don't think I'm glad. A lesser charge was my hope. 

 

cfcf
by Member on Aug. 7, 2014 at 4:45 PM
1 mom liked this
What is the background info on the neighborhood he lived in? I have to say, if someone banged on my door at 4:30 am I wouldn't answer it but I know my husband would and he would be armed.

The person was intoxicated, we can't say for certain what her demeanor was.

And what do they mean walked away from an accident? From a DUI?
Mommabearbergh
by on Aug. 7, 2014 at 4:49 PM
4 moms liked this
Well he was tried by a jury of his peers and he got found guilty.
parrishsky
by Maxfield on Aug. 7, 2014 at 4:50 PM
3 moms liked this

He got what he deserved.

sweet-a-kins
by Emerald Member on Aug. 7, 2014 at 4:51 PM
5 moms liked this

 He didn't know her demanor either. As soon as he saw her he shot her in the face

She knocked / banged loudly on the front and back door. Burglers don't normally announce themselves.

He said he couldn't find his phone...but he sure found his GUN didn't he.

HE opened the door, not her.

HE was armed, not her

HE shot before she uttered a word

Quoting cfcf: What is the background info on the neighborhood he lived in? I have to say, if someone banged on my door at 4:30 am I wouldn't answer it but I know my husband would and he would be armed. The person was intoxicated, we can't say for certain what her demeanor was. And what do they mean walked away from an accident? From a DUI?

 

cfcf
by Member on Aug. 7, 2014 at 4:54 PM
3 moms liked this
I don't see why that's so hard to comprehend. A cell phone is easy to misplace. Unless my phones in my hand I often don't remember where I set it down. A firearm is usually kept in the same place.

In a situation where I felt I had to protect myself I would grab my gun before looking for my cell phone.


Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 


Quoting RandRMomma: I was going to post this but you beat me to the punch. Thankfully, Kym Worthy (Wayne County Prosecutor) isn't a corrupt SOB and seeks justice. I'm glad he was found guilty.

I am glad he was convicted


He couldn't find his phone...but he COULD find his SHOTGUN?


OK


 

PamR
by Pam on Aug. 7, 2014 at 4:56 PM
2 moms liked this

I think this was deserved. 

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN