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Get to know Darren Wilson a little better

Posted by on Aug. 25, 2014 at 4:06 PM
  • 386 Replies

This is an excerpt from a WA Post article That includes a brief bio of Darren Wilson.  Now, I generally don't hold with judging a person by the actions of his or her relatives but the WA Post did it as if to suggest his mom's being a criminal gives some insight into the person who helped mold his personality.

It's long so if you have problems reading anything more than a few lines, don't bother.  

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/darren-wilsons-first-job-was-on-a-troubled-police-force-disbanded-by-authorities/2014/08/23/1ac796f0-2a45-11e4-8593-da634b334390_story.html

Wilson was born in Texas in 1986 to Tonya and John Wilson, and he had a sister, Kara. His parents divorced in 1989, when he was 2 or 3 years old.

His mother then married Tyler Harris, and they lived in Elgin, Tex., for a time, records show. Tyler and Tonya Harris had a child named Jared.

The family later moved to the suburban Missouri town of St. Peters, where Wilson’s mother again got divorced and married a man named Dan Durso, records indicate.

Wilson attended St. Charles West High School, in a predominantly white, middle-class community west of the Missouri River. He played junior varsity hockey for the West Warriors but wasn’t a standout.

There were problems at home. In 2001, when Wilson was a freshman in high school, his mother pleaded guilty to forgery and stealing. She was sentenced to five years in prison, although records suggest the court agreed to let her serve her sentence on probation.

She died of natural causes in November 2002, when Wilson was 16, records show. His stepfather, Tyler Harris, took over as his limited guardian, which ended when the boy turned 18.

A family friend, who spoke on the condition of anonymity out of fear of threats, said Wilson sought out a career in law enforcement as a way to create a solid foundation in his life that he’d been missing.

“He had a rough upbringing and just wanted to help people,” the friend said. In Wilson’s childhood, “there was just no structure.”

After going through the police academy, Wilson landed a job in 2009 as a rookie officer in Jennings, a small, struggling city of 14,000 where 89 percent of the residents were African American and poverty rates were high. At the time, the 45-employee police unit had one or two black members on the force, said Allan Stichnote, a white Jennings City Council member.

Racial tension was endemic in Jennings, said Rodney Epps, an African American city council member.

“You’re dealing with white cops, and they don’t know how to address black people,” Epps said. “The straw that broke the camel’s back, an officer shot at a female. She was stopped for a traffic violation. She had a child in the back [of the] car and was probably worried about getting locked up. And this officer chased her down Highway 70, past city limits, and took a shot at her. Just ridiculous.”

Police faced a series of lawsuits for using unnecessary force, Stichnote said. One black resident, Cassandra Fuller, sued the department claiming a white Jennings police officer beat her in June 2009 on her own porch after she made a joke. A car had smashed into her van, which was parked in front of her home, and she called police. The responding officer asked her to move the van. “It don’t run. You can take it home with you if you want,” she answered. She said the officer became enraged, threw her off the porch, knocked her to the ground and kicked her in the stomach.

The department paid Fuller a confidential sum to settle the case, she said.

“It’s like a horror story in my mind. I never thought a police officer would pull me off my porch and beat me to the ground, for just laughing,” Fuller said in an interview.

The Jennings department also had a corruption problem. A joint federal and local investigation discovered that a lieutenant had been accepting federal funds for drunken-driving checks that never happened.

All the problems became too much for the city council to bear, and in March 2011 the council voted 6-to-1 to shut down the department and hire St. Louis County to run its police services, putting Lt. Jeff Fuesting in charge as commander.

by on Aug. 25, 2014 at 4:06 PM
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Replies (1-10):
BoSoxJazzy
by Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 4:14 PM
6 moms liked this
A few thoughts popped into my head reading this. Was he involved or named in any of the racial incidents in Jennings? If not than that's kinda irrelevant information isn't it?
Also good people can come from horrid backgrounds and bad people from awesome ones. Unfortunately we can not say for sure what he got from his mom's past besides maybe the urge to be on the right side of the law? I don't know I don't know his mentality.
jcrew6
by Platinum Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 4:27 PM
21 moms liked this

None of this speaks of Wilson's career or about him specifically.  Not sure that it pertains to the the current investigation.  But, it allows people to feed the tabloid mentality of speculation and assumption. 

denise3680
by Gold Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 4:55 PM

i heard today that he was with another police dept. that has a history of racist behavior?  Makes one think, 1) why he left or got transfered and 2) what is his mind set towards people of color???

free1
by ~FreeSpirit~ on Aug. 25, 2014 at 5:11 PM
1 mom liked this

 Wilson landed a job in 2009 as a rookie officer in Jennings, a small, struggling city of 14,000 where 89 percent of the residents were African American and poverty rates were high. At the time, the 45-employee police unit had one or two black members on the force, said Allan Stichnote, a white Jennings City Council member.

Racial tension was endemic in Jennings, said Rodney Epps, an African American city council member.

“You’re dealing with white cops, and they don’t know how to address black people,” Epps said. “The straw that broke the camel’s back, an officer shot at a female. She was stopped for a traffic violation. She had a child in the back [of the] car and was probably worried about getting locked up. And this officer chased her down Highway 70, past city limits, and took a shot at her. Just ridiculous.”

Interesting.

JonJon
by Ruby Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 5:23 PM
1 mom liked this

If they can post pics of the kid shoving someone while going out the door, they can post an article that gives some insight into the kind of person Wilson is.

Notice no black person has come forward to say how wonderfully Wilson treated HIM during a time of crisis?  

He was going on a "sick baby" call that day.  I've never heard of that.  Anyway, it means he was assigned that neighborhood as a beat, doesn't it?  He must have gone on other "sick baby" calls.  Why doesn't anyone say how much he helped their sick baby?

Is a sick baby call a neglected baby?  In that case, they wouldn't call to say how wonderful he was unless it was to say he saw they weren't neglecting their baby and they appreciate him for that.  

Just things I'm pondering.

Quoting BoSoxJazzy: A few thoughts popped into my head reading this. Was he involved or named in any of the racial incidents in Jennings? If not than that's kinda irrelevant information isn't it? Also good people can come from horrid backgrounds and bad people from awesome ones. Unfortunately we can not say for sure what he got from his mom's past besides maybe the urge to be on the right side of the law? I don't know I don't know his mentality.


JonJon
by Ruby Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 5:25 PM


Quoting denise3680:

i heard today that he was with another police dept. that has a history of racist behavior?  Makes one think, 1) why he left or got transfered and 2) what is his mind set towards people of color???

It makes me wonder why they hired a guy who came from being released because his WHOLE police department was shut down!

Guess they figured he was just right for dealing with black people because he wasn't assigned to patrol the 23% white inhabitants of the city, kwim?

DSamuels
by Gold Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 5:37 PM
5 moms liked this

A "sick baby" call would be that someone called 911 because something was medically wrong with their "baby." Could have been a fall, sickness, whatever. I don't know if that would mean he was assigned a beat. It could be he was the closest car near the address.

I know when my dad had a vertigo attack and used his medic alert after sitting at his table for 6 hours (that's a whole 'nother story) they sent a fire truck with the ambulance. That's SOP for most places. The paramedics aren't trained or have the equipment to get into a locked residence if the person can't come to the door or unlock it to let them in. I'm sure they send a police car too to secure the residence, do some investigation, etc. 

I called the non-emergency number one night. I was home alone and the doorbell rang late at night. I didn't answer the door, but did check and there was no one there. I called the police and requested a drive-by and to check the yard and called hubby at work. They (hubby & police) arrived about the same time, didn't find anything. I have no idea who the cop was or what his name was. 

Quoting JonJon:

If they can post pics of the kid shoving someone while going out the door, they can post an article that gives some insight into the kind of person Wilson is.

Notice no black person has come forward to say how wonderfully Wilson treated HIM during a time of crisis?  

He was going on a "sick baby" call that day.  I've never heard of that.  Anyway, it means he was assigned that neighborhood as a beat, doesn't it?  He must have gone on other "sick baby" calls.  Why doesn't anyone say how much he helped their sick baby?

Is a sick baby call a neglected baby?  In that case, they wouldn't call to say how wonderful he was unless it was to say he saw they weren't neglecting their baby and they appreciate him for that.  

Just things I'm pondering.

Quoting BoSoxJazzy: A few thoughts popped into my head reading this. Was he involved or named in any of the racial incidents in Jennings? If not than that's kinda irrelevant information isn't it? Also good people can come from horrid backgrounds and bad people from awesome ones. Unfortunately we can not say for sure what he got from his mom's past besides maybe the urge to be on the right side of the law? I don't know I don't know his mentality.


GLWerth
by Gina on Aug. 25, 2014 at 5:38 PM

His first two years as a cop were on a force that was disbanded for corruption.

You think that isn't relevant? You believe that he was the only 'good' cop there, maybe?

Or is it just that nothing that might paint this officer in a less-than-favorable light isn't 'relevent'?

Quoting BoSoxJazzy: A few thoughts popped into my head reading this. Was he involved or named in any of the racial incidents in Jennings? If not than that's kinda irrelevant information isn't it? Also good people can come from horrid backgrounds and bad people from awesome ones. Unfortunately we can not say for sure what he got from his mom's past besides maybe the urge to be on the right side of the law? I don't know I don't know his mentality.


DSamuels
by Gold Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 5:42 PM
7 moms liked this

Honestly, I don't see how what his mother did has anything to do with him. She died when he was 16. One of his reasons for going into law enforcement was to help people. 

One line in the article didn't sit right with me. "The cops didn't know how to address black people." Really? Don't you talk to them and treat them the same way you do everyone else? I do. I would think treating them differently would be a problem.

DSamuels
by Gold Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 5:46 PM
6 moms liked this

So because some of the cops were corrupt, they all were? It doesn't even say how many. He may have been part of it, but I bet if he was they would say that.  

Way to judge the whole department.

Quoting GLWerth:

His first two years as a cop were on a force that was disbanded for corruption.

You think that isn't relevant? You believe that he was the only 'good' cop there, maybe?

Or is it just that nothing that might paint this officer in a less-than-favorable light isn't 'relevent'?

Quoting BoSoxJazzy: A few thoughts popped into my head reading this. Was he involved or named in any of the racial incidents in Jennings? If not than that's kinda irrelevant information isn't it? Also good people can come from horrid backgrounds and bad people from awesome ones. Unfortunately we can not say for sure what he got from his mom's past besides maybe the urge to be on the right side of the law? I don't know I don't know his mentality.



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