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Deadly superbugs

Posted by on Aug. 26, 2014 at 8:51 PM
  • 16 Replies


Deadly Superbugs Are Spreading In Our Hospitals And We Don’t Have Any Drugs To Stop Them

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"Deadly Superbugs Are Spreading In Our Hospitals And We Don’t Have Any Drugs To Stop Them"

A form of antibiotic-resistant bacteria known as CRE

A form of antibiotic-resistant bacteria known as CRE

CREDIT: AP Photo/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Antibiotic-resistant superbugs are rapidly spreading throughout hospitals in the southeastern United States, according to a new study published in the current issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. Medical experts warn that the findings should serve as a “wake up call” about a serious issue that threatens hospitals and nursing homes across the nation.

The five-year research project tracked a cluster of 25 community hospitals located in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Georgia. Researchers at Duke University Medical Center found that infections due to the potentially deadly germs known as CRE — which are virtually untreatable with our current antibiotics — increased by 500 percent in those hospitals between 2008 and 2012. And they say their new report probably underestimates the recent rise of CRE.

“CRE” refers to a class of bacteria that can lead to infections in the lungs, urinary tract, and blood. Healthy people aren’t typically at risk for becoming infected with CRE; the bacteria tends to strike patients with compromised immune systems who are receiving treatment through catheters and ventilators. Those patients are already vulnerable to begin with, and about half of them die once they’re infected with CRE. The World Health Organization (WHO) has designated CRE as one of the greatest threats to human health, while the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) calls it a “nightmare bacteria.”

The medical community has been concerned about CRE for the past decade, and has experimented with new technology to better sanitize health care settings to prevent the spread of the bug. However, as the Duke researchers write, “despite the global emergence of CRE, no clear consensus has emerged in regard to the method of detection.” There aren’t any standard screening or reporting protocols in place.

“This is a wake up call for community hospitals. More must be done to prepare and respond to CRE,” Dr. Joshua Thaden, the lead author of the study, said in a statement. Thaden believes his results point to a nationwide problem, and warns that “a CRE epidemic is fast approaching.”

One of the reasons that superbugs like CRE are on the rise is because of the overuse of antibiotics, which can allow bacteria to adapt and become resistant to the treatments typically used to combat them. This is an issue that’s larger than CRE itself. We’re also running out of effective treatments for common infections like malaria, tuberculosis, gonorrhea, and whooping cough. Nonetheless, research to create new antibiotics has stalled — largely because working to develop new drugs isn’t as profitable for the pharmaceutical industry.

Over the past several weeks, most of the attention surrounding public health issues has been dedicated to the potential threat posed by the current Ebola outbreak, which has killed more than 1,000 people in Western Africa. Although that’s certainly a serious international health concern, medical professionals say that it’s nowhere near as big of a threat to Americans as superbugs are.

“Freaking out about Ebola in the U.S. while antibiotic resistant superbugs rampage in our hospitals is like fearing Freddy Kruger will ring the doorbell while Jeffrey Dahmer sits at your dining room table,” Dr. Tim Lahey, an associate professor of microbiology and immunology at Duke Medical Center, told Jezebel in a recent interview. Lahey referred to the spread of antibiotic resistance as “truly nightmarish” but noted that “because it’s less exotic than Ebola it grips the popular imagination less well.”


by on Aug. 26, 2014 at 8:51 PM
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Replies (1-10):
skrbelly
by Bronze Member on Aug. 26, 2014 at 9:00 PM
1 mom liked this
This has been a problem for a long time now. When I was a kidwe couldn't name a medicine beyond Tylenol or Robitussin. I think it has been a disastrous policy to allow medicine to be directly marketed to the public. If you watch an hour of tv, you can convince yourself that you have all kinds of diseases that need medicine. Every common ailment is now a"medical condition" and someone will try to sell you a pill for that.Marketing has been great for business, but really terrible for public health
muslimahpj
by Ruby Member on Aug. 26, 2014 at 9:03 PM
2 moms liked this

Over use of antibiotics in everything has played a big hand in this.

Quoting skrbelly: This has been a problem for a long time now. When I was a kidwe couldn't name a medicine beyond Tylenol or Robitussin. I think it has been a disastrous policy to allow medicine to be directly marketed to the public. If you watch an hour of tv, you can convince yourself that you have all kinds of diseases that need medicine. Every common ailment is now a"medical condition" and someone will try to sell you a pill for that.Marketing has been great for business, but really terrible for public health



angelachristine
by Bronze Member on Aug. 26, 2014 at 9:06 PM
1 mom liked this

I have a friend that was born in the us and moved to Sweden several years ago. Anyway she is in for a visit and we were talking about health care over here verses over there. She said they barely gave you antibiotics at all and you have to get scripts for benadryl and other things that are otc here. 

She said the first year she got sick all the time getting used to it but after that she says she's never been healthier.

Quoting muslimahpj:

Over use of antibiotics in everything has played a big hand in this.

Quoting skrbelly: This has been a problem for a long time now. When I was a kidwe couldn't name a medicine beyond Tylenol or Robitussin. I think it has been a disastrous policy to allow medicine to be directly marketed to the public. If you watch an hour of tv, you can convince yourself that you have all kinds of diseases that need medicine. Every common ailment is now a"medical condition" and someone will try to sell you a pill for that.Marketing has been great for business, but really terrible for public health


OHgirlinCA
by Platinum Member on Aug. 26, 2014 at 9:11 PM

This concerns me greatly!   Anti-resistant super bugs may very well become the plague of our times. I believe it is incredibly important to research and find ways to combat these diseases.

muslimahpj
by Ruby Member on Aug. 26, 2014 at 9:18 PM


Quoting OHgirlinCA:

This concerns me greatly!   Anti-resistant super bugs may very well become the plague of our times. I believe it is incredibly important to research and find ways to combat these diseases.

Yes. I have read that they are thinking of pulling the antibacterial soaps and such off the shelves. They should, we really over do it.Also, people dont need to demand antibiotics for every sniffle. A virus will not be affected by antibiotics. Also, if prescribed antibiotic, finish it. If you stop it, the bacterial just mutates and the drugs wont be effective anymore.

Sorry, this is a big petpeeve of mine. Even my mom who is an RN thinks antibiotics cure everything and Im like, you know better, stop it.

(If my spelling or grammer is off, it's cause Im taking pain meds)


OHgirlinCA
by Platinum Member on Aug. 26, 2014 at 9:26 PM
1 mom liked this

I agree with everything you just said! You are absolutely right! Antibiotics do nothing to fight viruses, so they do nothing to combat the common cold or flu. I do not take my family to see the doctor unless they've been running a high fever for a few days since, as you already know, that could indicate a secondary infection that actually may need to be treated with antibiotics.

Quoting muslimahpj:

Quoting OHgirlinCA:

This concerns me greatly!   Anti-resistant super bugs may very well become the plague of our times. I believe it is incredibly important to research and find ways to combat these diseases.

Yes. I have read that they are thinking of pulling the antibacterial soaps and such off the shelves. They should, we really over do it.Also, people dont need to demand antibiotics for every sniffle. A virus will not be affected by antibiotics. Also, if prescribed antibiotic, finish it. If you stop it, the bacterial just mutates and the drugs wont be effective anymore.

Sorry, this is a big petpeeve of mine. Even my mom who is an RN thinks antibiotics cure everything and Im like, you know better, stop it.

(If my spelling or grammer is off, it's cause Im taking pain meds)


Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Aug. 27, 2014 at 12:16 AM

This is a predictable (and, indeed, predicted) result of how antibiotics have been prescribed in America.

Mrs.Pedro
by Bronze Member on Aug. 27, 2014 at 12:28 AM

 This is why I don't take my kids to the ER unless there is a real need for it. I try to keep doctor's appointments to a minimum as well since it is in our hospital. None of my kids have had antibiotics and I hope to keep it that way for as long as possible. None of them have hit school years yet, so I'm getting more nervous about them getting sick as that approaches. But even if they do get sick they will not get antibiotics unless they are VERY highly needed. I'm a firm believe in let your body do as it should when sick. There needs to be a lot more emphasis on creating drugs to combat these super bugs, but I don't see that happening for awhile... Pharmaceuticals make their money off sick people, not healthy ones.

Woodbabe
by Woodie on Aug. 27, 2014 at 7:30 AM

MIS-use of them has greatly contributed as well! Taking just a few until you feel better and then saving the rest to use another time...BIG NO NO. It doesn't kill off all of the bacteria, just weakens it. Its allowed to regrow, altering into something stronger that can't be killed by that same antibiotic next time.

Quoting muslimahpj:

Over use of antibiotics in everything has played a big hand in this.

Quoting skrbelly: This has been a problem for a long time now. When I was a kidwe couldn't name a medicine beyond Tylenol or Robitussin. I think it has been a disastrous policy to allow medicine to be directly marketed to the public. If you watch an hour of tv, you can convince yourself that you have all kinds of diseases that need medicine. Every common ailment is now a"medical condition" and someone will try to sell you a pill for that.Marketing has been great for business, but really terrible for public health


~Parenting is not a Competitive Sport~
Woodbabe
by Woodie on Aug. 27, 2014 at 7:33 AM


Quoting muslimahpj:

Quoting OHgirlinCA:

This concerns me greatly!   Anti-resistant super bugs may very well become the plague of our times. I believe it is incredibly important to research and find ways to combat these diseases.

Yes. I have read that they are thinking of pulling the antibacterial soaps and such off the shelves. They should, we really over do it.Also, people dont need to demand antibiotics for every sniffle. A virus will not be affected by antibiotics. Also, if prescribed antibiotic, finish it. If you stop it, the bacterial just mutates and the drugs wont be effective anymore.

Sorry, this is a big petpeeve of mine. Even my mom who is an RN thinks antibiotics cure everything and Im like, you know better, stop it.

(If my spelling or grammer is off, it's cause Im taking pain meds)

Interesting, I just read this morning that Colgate Total still contains Triclosan, the ingredient that has/is being taken out of these soaps.

~Parenting is not a Competitive Sport~
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