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Citolapram(Celexa) in preliminary study for Alzheimers Prevention/Treatment

Posted by on Aug. 28, 2014 at 1:55 PM
  • 10 Replies

No, it's not yet time to go stock up on Celexa, but I've been following a very peculiar development:

Celexa seems to very rapidly start cutting the development of amyloid tangles typical of Alzheimers, by about 75-80%.

Even before it has an effect on depression.

But something else very wild came out of this:

Celexa and other antidepressants may work (and may take weeks or months to take effect) because they are helping new healthy nerve cells to grow.  

It's been suspected for some time that antidepressants actually do protect brain cells so cells can grow as they should, by helping 'nerve factors' that nourish .... ah....baby nerve cells.

Depression and other disorders may actually interfere with new brain cell growth - in other words - something that is natural and needs to take place, is prevented by depression.

So that even more wildly - now we have proof that brain cells continue to grow in adults, in areas of the brain where that was not thought to be possible, just a few years ago.

It's not time to go out and stock up on Celexa, yet, as I said.  But I'll be watching closely over the next year or two to see if these researchers can take their research on to the point of actually having ENOUGH data to make solid recommendations.

With Celexa and similar drugs going generic, we may see the drug companies struggle to prevent their little treasures from going generic, if more uses are found for those drugs.   Two companies in Denmark already tried to delay Celexa going generic and got slapped up side of the head for it.   

If general guidelines come out for medication that helps prevent Alzheimer tangles from forming to that degree(they form years before obvious symptoms occur), it would be very good if it were generic medicine.


by on Aug. 28, 2014 at 1:55 PM
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Replies (1-10):
snookyfritz
by Platinum Member on Aug. 28, 2014 at 2:29 PM

That's pretty amazing. 

lancet98
by Silver Member on Aug. 28, 2014 at 2:58 PM

Depression may actually prevent new nerve cells from developing  - THAT blew me away totally.

It explains one thing I've wondered about for years - why antidepressants take a long time to lift mood - because it's actually helping replacement nerve cells form.

snookyfritz
by Platinum Member on Aug. 28, 2014 at 3:12 PM

I had no idea how they worked.  The possiblities are mind boggling (or not)  God, I crack myself up 

Quoting lancet98:

Depression may actually prevent new nerve cells from developing  - THAT blew me away totally.

It explains one thing I've wondered about for years - why antidepressants take a long time to lift mood - because it's actually helping replacement nerve cells form.


lancet98
by Silver Member on Aug. 28, 2014 at 5:00 PM
1 mom liked this


Well, I hope that line of investigation turns up some new treatments and even, dare I say it, cures.   

As far as for cracking me up, I'd settle for some good chocolate right now.  

LOL....a friend asked me, 'But why do you believe their results, maybe the makers of celexa rigged the study?'

I LMAO - 'because celexa is going generic soon!'

LOL...no ulterior motive...

Quoting snookyfritz:

I had no idea how they worked.  The possiblities are mind boggling (or not)  God, I crack myself up 

Quoting lancet98:

Depression may actually prevent new nerve cells from developing  - THAT blew me away totally.

It explains one thing I've wondered about for years - why antidepressants take a long time to lift mood - because it's actually helping replacement nerve cells form.



PamR
by Pam on Aug. 28, 2014 at 5:53 PM

I've taken it for a long time to treat depression. Maybe it will help me keep from having Alzheimer's as well. Good to see it having an effect on that disease. 

HollyZ.30
by Member on Aug. 28, 2014 at 7:32 PM

I'm on Celexa. It's a great medication.

canadianmom1974
by Gold Member on Aug. 28, 2014 at 10:30 PM

 My hubs is on citalopram and it's worked wonders for him. He has an anxiety disorder rather than depression, but it's still been great and if it has longer term benefits, even better!

mhwillet
by New Member on Aug. 29, 2014 at 5:07 PM
1 mom liked this
I highly doubt that is going to be the magic pill for Alzhemier's. It is hard to create a drug for a disease that is barely understood today. And only can be truely diagnosed during an autopsy. My MIL has end stage alzhemier's and has been for the last 4 or more years a vegetable. She started showing symptoms in her late 30's to early 40's in October she will 68. She has been on ever "miracle" drug and nothing works. Ask any doctor who specializes in elder care or dementia. I highly doubt this is the new miracle cure. Alzhemier's is a nasty disease that robs your mind but leaves your body unharmed.
lancet98
by Silver Member on Aug. 29, 2014 at 5:30 PM

I am sorry for your loss and I understand your pessimism.

But your sadness and your situation, do not change the fact that the amyloid tangles of Alzheimers were sharply affected by this medication.

Whether that translates into a future treatment or just helps us to understand the disease better, it is a positive development.   Nothing can change that.   It is a fact that will not go away.

Alzheimers can be diagnosed before death(but this is so costly that it is not possible outside of research), in fact it is now clear that it is in motion long before symptoms even start.   

I lost my father to dementia, so my hopefulness and positive outlook is NOT because I did not lose someone to dementia.   I did, it was horrible, and very sad.   Yet I recognize that knowledge is our best weapon against this horrible disease, and that knowledge is how we move ahead, not by bitterness.

Yes, I miss my father every single day.   His death was a horrific tragedy that tore my family apart.   The dementia diseases cut a very wide swath, causing great damage in our society.

And some day, they may be a thing of the past.   I don't let my personal tragedy dim my hope for others.

Quoting mhwillet: I highly doubt that is going to be the magic pill for Alzhemier's. It is hard to create a drug for a disease that is barely understood today. And only can be truely diagnosed during an autopsy. My MIL has end stage alzhemier's and has been for the last 4 or more years a vegetable. She started showing symptoms in her late 30's to early 40's in October she will 68. She has been on ever "miracle" drug and nothing works. Ask any doctor who specializes in elder care or dementia. I highly doubt this is the new miracle cure. Alzhemier's is a nasty disease that robs your mind but leaves your body unharmed.


littlemum41
by Silver Member on Aug. 29, 2014 at 9:34 PM

 

Quoting mhwillet: I highly doubt that is going to be the magic pill for Alzhemier's. It is hard to create a drug for a disease that is barely understood today. And only can be truely diagnosed during an autopsy. My MIL has end stage alzhemier's and has been for the last 4 or more years a vegetable. She started showing symptoms in her late 30's to early 40's in October she will 68. She has been on ever "miracle" drug and nothing works. Ask any doctor who specializes in elder care or dementia. I highly doubt this is the new miracle cure. Alzhemier's is a nasty disease that robs your mind but leaves your body unharmed.

 My Dad died of Alzheimers in 1998. He was 86. He had shown symptoms for many years and I suspected it whenever we visited him. ( He lived out of state). I don't think anything helped him and he spent the last two years of his life in a nursing home for Alzheimers patients. It is a horrible disease in that the people who have it fade away mentally and their family and friends watch and know that they are no longer recognized by them.

I am pretty sure that there was nothing that came close to helping him out of the medications they gave him. But I hope there can be a cure or something to slow down the progress.

I know how you feel. It is sad.

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