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Is it ethical to ask children to make promises? Are such promises really binding?

Posted by on Dec. 20, 2014 at 4:08 AM
  • 65 Replies

Two pages from a book some parents are getting their children this Christmas:



by on Dec. 20, 2014 at 4:08 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Dec. 20, 2014 at 4:11 AM

Here's how to share the important message of Revelation with your children:

Read the book with your child

Each page contains simple text for children, along with lavish illustrations and supporting scripture from the KJV Bible.

Help your child sign the certificate

Each book comes with an 8x10 certificate for your child to sign, promising to worship only God and never take the mark of the beast.

Frame and hang the certificate

We have hand-selected matching frames, so your child will be continually reminded of his or her promise and will never forget it.



http://www.virtuepress.com/static/preview/index.html

AdrianneHill
by Ruby Member on Dec. 20, 2014 at 4:19 AM
2 moms liked this
Creepy
AdrianneHill
by Ruby Member on Dec. 20, 2014 at 4:22 AM
1 mom liked this
But on the topic, I don't think it's too much to ask for promises. These aren't promises, they're loyalty oaths. I think it's different than promising to try to stay tidy or finish reading a book by a certain day. I prefer things more finite and less creepy
Seasidegirl
by on Dec. 20, 2014 at 7:46 AM

These freaks never stop, do they? They get more and more outlandish. 

Seasidegirl
by on Dec. 20, 2014 at 7:47 AM

The mark of the beast. Oh dear lawd. 

momtoscott
by on Dec. 20, 2014 at 8:07 AM
1 mom liked this

I think teaching a child the ethical and social value of keeping its word and being trustworthy is important and part of a parent's job.  Also important is teaching the child when a promise cannot or should not be made and how to assess and handle breaking a promise.  

The certificate in the OP is already fraught with problems, as all Christians seem acknowledge that it is impossible to obey their god and his rules 100% of the time, even with Jesus's help--that is why Jesus has to sacrifice himself.  

Asking a child to make a promise that the adult knows cannot be kept is already fraud on the adult's part, and the child should not be held to it.  I am not a fan of the term "promise" at any rate, because I don't think a promise ought to be considered any more specially binding than just saying you will do something (or not do something).  

Signing something like the certificate in the OP has zero positive effect on a child and many negatives.  

Debmomto2girls
by on Dec. 20, 2014 at 8:42 AM

Very creepy.

PerseyG
by Silver Member on Dec. 20, 2014 at 9:08 AM
1 mom liked this
Those poor stock photo models. lol. The girl in the center is trying to get her homework done.
UpSheRises
by Platinum Member on Dec. 20, 2014 at 9:10 AM
1 mom liked this

Perception is reality.

If you live in a world where a vengeful god exists then you have a duty as a parent to encourage your child to obey god. Likewise, in a world where a vengeful god exacts horrific punishment on non-believers, coercing children into upholding your personal beliefs by making promises they don't understand is perfectly acceptable.

tapies2324
by Member on Dec. 20, 2014 at 9:12 AM
You should post this in the Christian Connections Cafe. You might get more interesting answers. I'm not being snarky here, I just think a Christian view on the topic would be interesting.
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