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Five Things That Kids Can't Do Anymore

Posted by on Jan. 6, 2015 at 7:16 PM
  • 41 Replies

Five Things That Kids Can't Do Anymore

PHOTO: Zoe Reisen, of Dubuque, Iowa, sleds down a hill at Allison-Henderson Park on in Dubuque, Iowa, in this Dec. 11, 2013 file photo.

Outdoor activities get an extra dose of danger when snow and ice are added but now it's gone too far for some towns that have decided ban a kid favorite: sledding.

Dubuque, Iowa is expected to enforce a ban that would keep kids from sliding down all but two of the town's make-shift slopes in hopes of cutting down on injuries and possible liability claims against the city.

Sledding is just the latest pastime to come under fire, adding to the seemingly endless list of activities that are too dangerous for today's youngsters. Here are some of the other activities that aren't allowed anymore.

Trampolines The American Academy of Pediatrics issued a formal report urging the ban on recreational trampoline use because the number of injuries had been steadily increasing for years.

Their reportcited sprains and contusions as the most common injuries, only 27 to 39 percent of which took place when jumpers fell from the trampoline.

PHOTO: Some schools are banning peanut butter and jelly sandwiches due to allergy concerns.
Nicole S. Young/Getty Images
PHOTO: Some schools are banning peanut butter and jelly sandwiches due to allergy concerns.

Peanut Butter Sandwiches and Birthday Cakes Food allergies, and the sensitivities surrounding them, have become heightened in recent years to the extent that most parents of elementary school children avoid putting peanut butter in packed lunches.

Peanuts aren't the only source of ire now, however, with certain school districts adapting their list to ban whatever other ingredients are the source of bad reactions, even if for only one child in the entire district. Eggs, soy, and wheat are some of the latest taboo ingredients, and sugar is now the subject of a growing group of health-conscious parents.

The Boone County School District in Kentucky is one such school, and their Burlington Elementary School does not allow food treats -- like cupcakes or cookies -- at celebrations. Instead, they encourage students and parents to bring non-food items like stickers, jump ropes or pencils to get the party started.

Snap Bracelets This is going back a ways, but even though "snap bracelets" or "Slap Wraps" were popular in the 1990s, they were technically banned by many school districts throughout the decades.

The devices' latest iteration has turned the dangerous connotations on its head, as reflective snap bracelets are now often used by bicyclists who want to keep their pant legs from getting caught in gears.

Keeping Score The competitive element was too much for parents and certain sports leagues where bans against keeping tallies of score means that there are no winners or losers.

Critics see trophies for participation as the formalized acceptance of mediocrity, but supporters see it as a way to soften the blow for children who need not stress over unnecessary competition.

by on Jan. 6, 2015 at 7:16 PM
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Replies (1-10):
4evrinbluejeans
by KK on Jan. 6, 2015 at 7:19 PM
1 mom liked this

of course they can still do these things.  What a silly suggestion.  

Lady_Facetious
by Gold Member on Jan. 6, 2015 at 7:23 PM
First lawn darts, now this? Fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuck
justinnaimee
by Bronze Member on Jan. 6, 2015 at 7:24 PM
My kids have a trampoline and snap bracelets. They eat peanut butter and take cupcakes to school. And their competitive gymnastics are scored. Up until level 3 everyone gets ribbons but they get colored ribbons based on their scores.
VooDooB
by corrupter on Jan. 6, 2015 at 7:27 PM
2 moms liked this

My kid can do whatever he wants and whatever I deem OKAY on OUR property and/or in MY allowance. If I take him sledding at a city park and he breaks his collarbone, that's on me. Not the city. Just like it was when I was a kid. I'm not a sue happy trashy motherfucker.

PPCLC
by Lisa on Jan. 6, 2015 at 7:28 PM

While raising my own three children, it was rare that I listened to suggestions of the American Academy of Pediatrics, especially after I finally lost that initial nervousness of parenting with our first child.

I'll be honest--I've never been a fan of trampolines, though we did let our kid's use them.

PB&J....unless we knew a child had a peanut allergy (and those were not as common or should I write, spoken of back then as they are today), my kid's still had these sandwiches. Heck, my husband takes a couple of them on the road when he's doing in-state driving for his company.

Snap bracelets? My two older kid's had them but grew tired of them as they did with any fad.

Keeping score? Now THIS I actually have heard is a problem today with community and school sporting activities. Every child gets rewarded for participation versus kids actually playing the sport as they once did, those doing better earning the rewards.

But these are all things that kids can still do for the most part. Seems like Ms. Keneally really didn't do too thorough of a job on her homework possibly.

QueenBarbie
by Silver Member on Jan. 6, 2015 at 7:28 PM
1 mom liked this

Peanut butter and anything homemade is banned at my children's schools.  We don't have a trampoline because we would lose our homeowners insurance if we had one. 

My kids do keep score when playing sports!!  They are competitive. 

It is insane the number of things being banned imo, though.

ED95120
by on Jan. 6, 2015 at 7:30 PM

I'm shocked. I don't live in a place where it snows. Before this year it hardly even rained in Southern California. If we want snow we go up North. When we go to the snow the first thing my jellybeans want to do is sled! They put helmets on. We teach them to be safe. What is this world going to come to if we don't allow our children to get some cuts and scraps. 

LittleBear10-5
by on Jan. 6, 2015 at 7:30 PM
That's is just ridiculous. What I really don't get is the competitive one. Not everyone can be a winner all the time. I think it's important for kids to learn that you win some and lose some and that it's ok to lose sometimes. I think it teaches them an important lesson in how to not be a sore loser or sore winner.
QueenBarbie
by Silver Member on Jan. 6, 2015 at 7:32 PM

Totally agree!!!


Quoting LittleBear10-5: That's is just ridiculous. What I really don't get is the competitive one. Not everyone can be a winner all the time. I think it's important for kids to learn that you win some and lose some and that it's ok to lose sometimes. I think it teaches them an important lesson in how to not be a sore loser or sore winner.


Luvnlogic
by Platinum Member on Jan. 6, 2015 at 8:16 PM
I understand cities wanting to protect themselves from liability with the sledding thing. There's plenty of other places to sled, though, right? I don't live in a snowy place so I really don't know.

I don't see trampolines actually being outlawed for private use no matter what the AAP thinks.

Food allergies are a serious issue for some and I don't have a big problem avoiding packing certain things into my kids' lunch so that another kid doesn't end up ill or worse.

Slap bracelets? Really? This is an issue worth complaining about or was she just trying to hit the big number 5 on her list? :)

Trophies for all is fine for young kids who are just learning about competition. And there are still plenty of competitive teams/organizations out there if you prefer to have your older children participate. America is NOT is danger of losing it's competitive edge due to 3 year old soccer teams not keeping score.

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