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School shootings

Posted by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 12:29 PM
  • 18 Replies
by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 12:29 PM
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FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Jan. 14, 2015 at 12:36 PM

Oh.my.

Buahahahahahaha

4evrinbluejeans
by KK on Jan. 14, 2015 at 1:09 PM

If it prevents loss of life is it still laughable?  

4evrinbluejeans
by KK on Jan. 14, 2015 at 1:11 PM

story linked in the letter.  

Equipped with Cans of Soup- The Alice Drill

October 31, 2013
By 

soup 03For those of you who went to Dunkin Donuts during C Block on Thursday October 24th, the school completed its first ALICE drill to prepare for intruders in the case of a dangerous incident. ALICE stands for Alert-Lockdown-Inform-Counter-Evacuate and was mandated by the state to provide an alternative solution to the previous lockdown method. In the past, the school has advised students to stay in their classrooms against the walls with the lights turned off and the doors locked. The goal was to avoid chaos in the hallways, and potentially creating targets in large numbers. However, after further examination of these methods in school shootings throughout the nation, this response did not seem adequate. In the Sandy Hook Newtown shooting incident that occurred December 14, 2012, students were harmed because they stayed in their classrooms and followed protocol. In light of these incidents, Massachusetts has decided to implement the ALICE system which allows teachers and students to respond the threat in a manner they deem necessary.

With the help of the Concord police, the school went through three scenarios: typical lockdown, intruder in the cafeteria, and intruder in front of S-18. For the second two situations, students and teachers had to decide the appropriate course of action. The majority evacuated either to the parking lot or to the front of the Beede Center. Some students reported that there was a bottleneck situation when students left the building near the construction, which stopped  movement for awhile. Principal Badalament addressed these concerns in an email to the student-news and through the loudspeakers saying, “most of you thought that it was a very worthwhile exercise. People said it got them thinking about what they would do in a bad situation. We know, and advise, in a real situation that you would move much farther away from the building. We would not expect you to stand in large groups near the building. During future drills we will practice gathering up on the Turf Fields after the immediate danger has passed. This will be the place that we will account for people and then reunite them with their families. In a real situation, the police would be headed to the target, not supervising our exit.”

Each science classroom is equipped with cans of soup to be thrown at the intruder in the instance that the intruder enters the classroom. Many students and teachers have thought of more creative ways to handle the situation; textbooks, chairs, calculators, and other heavy classroom materials have been suggested as possible defense equipment.English teacher Kate Fleming even suggested equipping each student with a hardcover edition of Madame Bovary. Math teacher Jeryll Kennedy even brought three filing cabinets into the classroom to barricade the doors. Teachers even went so far as to show students a secret dusty tunnel in the physics classroom, as Elaine Picard and Kevin Penucci both did. World Religions teacher Ethan Hoblitzelle encouraged a calm state of mind during these drills by allowing his students to meditate.

Cricket McCaffrey-Clark laid out an extensive plain of escape for her AP Chemistry students; her advice was to “take the road less travelled.” She mapped out routes to avoid traffic jams such as routes going through the I building instead of the conventional S building route. Her students reported that they felt overwhelmed by her safe presence and have confidence that in the case of an actual emergency, they will be prepared. Her words of wisdom are, “be aware of your surroundings because that is what can ultimately make the difference between life and death in these situations.”

Police officers noted that the drills went smoothly. Badalament promises that the school will incorporate students’ feedback to ensure that future drills will run more efficiently. He leaves us with an important message that “school is statistically the safest place you can be on any given day. In reality, you are the ones that keep us safe, as you are committed to sharing your concerns with adults.”

 

4evrinbluejeans
by KK on Jan. 14, 2015 at 1:15 PM

ALICE & Run-Hide-Fight Training: Teaching Students to Attack Gunmen

http://www.schoolsecurity.org/trends/alice-training/

What sounds like good theory and satisfies surface-level emotional needs is more complex, expert says

Training of school staff, who are legally and morally responsible for the safety of children, should be the focus.

Teachers, administrators, school police and security officers, and other staff  should continue to take the primary lead for protecting students.

Should schools train secondary and elementary students to throw objects and physically attack armed intruders in their classroom?

ALICE Training, Run-Hide-Fight, and Similar Programs Generate Controversy and Debate

The debate grows as a number of current and former self-defense trainers, individuals with military background, and some School Resource Officers and others in law enforcement advocate for this approach.  This is often referred to as ALICE Training, where ALICE stands for Alert-Lockdown-Inform-Counter-Evacuate or run-hide-fight, a federal Homeland Security Department program originally created for use in workplace settings. We respect the individuals and organizations putting forth these theories, but it is our opinion that the concepts are well-intended but not well-though-out for preK-12 school settings.

ALICE, run-hide-fight, and other similar programs offer little-to-nothing new with alerts and lockdowns, and schools are already being trained to have evacuation plans.  The idea of “inform” questionably assumes that someone in the school will be able to visually monitor all of the suspects while simultaneously “informing” or communicating their whereabouts to everyone in the building. Those who understand preK-12 school security know that the majority of schools do not have comprehensive camera systems for monitoring and tracking active shooters (or anyone else) and there are risks in the implementation of this theory.

The controversial issues rise over the Counter component of ALICE, or the fight component of run-hide-fight, which advocates training children to try to “distract” and “confuse” armed suspects by throwing items and attacking the heavily armed gunman.  Many educators, law enforcement officers, parents and school safety specialists do not support this proposed approach for “training” students in preK-12 school settings.

This question was posed to school safety expert, Ken Trump, by Fox News Channel producers in December of 2008 in response to a Massachusetts school district that was considering such training options with children as young as 10 years old. Ironically, the Texas school district that was one of the first, if not the first, to advance this concept reversed its decision back in 2006 according to an AP report (see section below on school leaders rejecting the approach).

Ken Trump takes a deeper analysis of these concepts and the questions which arise in the following sections below:


Luvnlogic
by Platinum Member on Jan. 14, 2015 at 1:17 PM
1 mom liked this
I like this idea. Sitting against a wall, lined up all nicely, has always seemed stupid to me. Use what you have available, run, fight, have a meeting place. It's what we would tell our kids if they weren't at school, right? If an intruder broke into my home, I would not tell my kids to sit quietly against a wall.
FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Jan. 14, 2015 at 1:18 PM

Honestly, at first I thought this was satire.


HAHuskey
by Member on Jan. 14, 2015 at 1:28 PM
1 mom liked this
Yes. It is. I hope it does work(in the event that it was needed). I can also see it becoming a problem in itself. Kids will be throwing the cans at each other.

Quoting 4evrinbluejeans:

If it prevents loss of life is it still laughable?  

Bieg9093
by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 4:14 PM

It's really not a bad idea at all considering

1.  None of these kids are going to be victims of a school shooting.

2.  Giving them a weapon and a plan is a good way to provide the kids some peace of mind.  They don't have to worry about what they would do.  They know what they should do. 

3.  As a strategy, it wouldn't likely make a difference.  But it's got a marginally better chance than would trying to silently hide in a closet or bathroom, where they're cornered.

The only problem is that the school never should have asked for the cans.  They should have just bought them on sale.  The best chance for an unexpected strategy's success is for it to be unexpected...not advertised in multiple news articles. 

 

Bieg9093
by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 4:17 PM

 

Quoting 4evrinbluejeans:

story linked in the letter.  

Equipped with Cans of Soup- The Alice Drill

October 31, 2013
By 

soup 03For those of you who went to Dunkin Donuts during C Block on Thursday October 24th, the school completed its first ALICE drill to prepare for intruders in the case of a dangerous incident. ALICE stands for Alert-Lockdown-Inform-Counter-Evacuate and was mandated by the state to provide an alternative solution to the previous lockdown method. In the past, the school has advised students to stay in their classrooms against the walls with the lights turned off and the doors locked. The goal was to avoid chaos in the hallways, and potentially creating targets in large numbers. However, after further examination of these methods in school shootings throughout the nation, this response did not seem adequate. In the Sandy Hook Newtown shooting incident that occurred December 14, 2012, students were harmed because they stayed in their classrooms and followed protocol. In light of these incidents, Massachusetts has decided to implement the ALICE system which allows teachers and students to respond the threat in a manner they deem necessary.

With the help of the Concord police, the school went through three scenarios: typical lockdown, intruder in the cafeteria, and intruder in front of S-18. For the second two situations, students and teachers had to decide the appropriate course of action. The majority evacuated either to the parking lot or to the front of the Beede Center. Some students reported that there was a bottleneck situation when students left the building near the construction, which stopped  movement for awhile. Principal Badalament addressed these concerns in an email to the student-news and through the loudspeakers saying, “most of you thought that it was a very worthwhile exercise. People said it got them thinking about what they would do in a bad situation. We know, and advise, in a real situation that you would move much farther away from the building. We would not expect you to stand in large groups near the building. During future drills we will practice gathering up on the Turf Fields after the immediate danger has passed. This will be the place that we will account for people and then reunite them with their families. In a real situation, the police would be headed to the target, not supervising our exit.”

Each science classroom is equipped with cans of soup to be thrown at the intruder in the instance that the intruder enters the classroom. Many students and teachers have thought of more creative ways to handle the situation; textbooks, chairs, calculators, and other heavy classroom materials have been suggested as possible defense equipment.English teacher Kate Fleming even suggested equipping each student with a hardcover edition of Madame Bovary. Math teacher Jeryll Kennedy even brought three filing cabinets into the classroom to barricade the doors. Teachers even went so far as to show students a secret dusty tunnel in the physics classroom, as Elaine Picard and Kevin Penucci both did. World Religions teacher Ethan Hoblitzelle encouraged a calm state of mind during these drills by allowing his students to meditate.

Cricket McCaffrey-Clark laid out an extensive plain of escape for her AP Chemistry students; her advice was to “take the road less travelled.” She mapped out routes to avoid traffic jams such as routes going through the I building instead of the conventional S building route. Her students reported that they felt overwhelmed by her safe presence and have confidence that in the case of an actual emergency, they will be prepared. Her words of wisdom are, “be aware of your surroundings because that is what can ultimately make the difference between life and death in these situations.”

Police officers noted that the drills went smoothly. Badalament promises that the school will incorporate students’ feedback to ensure that future drills will run more efficiently. He leaves us with an important message that “school is statistically the safest place you can be on any given day. In reality, you are the ones that keep us safe, as you are committed to sharing your concerns with adults.”

 

 See...this is just great!

turtle68
by Mahinaarangi on Jan. 14, 2015 at 4:30 PM
1 mom liked this

that is really sad :-)  I hope I never see the day that I have to worry about this.

All I can see happening is the kids throwing the can at other kids or staff.

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