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French Muslim Students Refused to Honor Moment of Silence.

Posted by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 6:35 PM
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1 mom liked this

 

French Muslim Students Refused to Honor Moment of Silence for Charlie Hebdo Attack

A nationwide minute of silence for the victims of the attack on Charlie Hebdo’s Paris offices was not honored by some Muslim students in French schools, a BBC reporter claimed.

Following last Wednesday’s slaughter of 12 people at the satirical newspaper by Islamic terrorists, President Francois Hollande asked the French people to observe a moment of silence the following day.

But while most of the nation responded with an outpouring of grief and solidarity, one subset of the French nation was less-than-reverential.

“I’m already getting reports from people in France that some schools in those strongly Muslim neighborhoods, the kids didn’t stand for the minute’s silence,” BBC reporter Katty Kay said on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” on Monday. “They see those attackers as heroes. How do we change that? Because that’s where the problem for Europe lies.”

Kay said the Muslim-dominated Parisian suburbs must be “detoxified,” explaining that radicalization is spreading rapidly within the French Muslim community.

Muslims worldwide were incensed by Charlie Hebdo’s publication of cartoons mocking their prophet Mohammed, with many calling for revenge attacks like the one finally carried out last week. 

by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 6:35 PM
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VooDooB
by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 6:38 PM
6 moms liked this
If the roles were reversed I'm sure they'd all be stoned to death by now.
-Celestial-
by Pepperlynn on Jan. 14, 2015 at 6:48 PM
3 moms liked this

Mobile Photo

jaxTheMomm
by Platinum Member on Jan. 14, 2015 at 6:56 PM
3 moms liked this

Quoting VooDooB: If the roles were reversed I'm sure they'd all be stoned to death by now.


QueenBarbie
by Silver Member on Jan. 14, 2015 at 6:59 PM
1 mom liked this

 True.

 

Quoting VooDooB: If the roles were reversed I'm sure they'd all be stoned to death by now.

 

12hellokitty
by Ruby Member on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:03 PM
1 mom liked this

JaeMommy07
by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:18 PM
1 mom liked this
Wow. It took me a while to understand what you meant (silly me lol) and yeah, probably.

Quoting VooDooB: If the roles were reversed I'm sure they'd all be stoned to death by now.
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TerraIncognita
by Bronze Member on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:24 PM
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This article didnt give enough information for me to conclude anything.

I'd like to know how many children were reported to have sat out of the moment of silence. Were the kids even interviewed or did the reporter just assume it was because they saw the attackers as heroes?

It could be that a child did not want to honor a group of people who made it their business to mock the religion they hold dear. That doesn't mean they agreed with the killers.

Or, it could be something entirely different.
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QueenBarbie
by Silver Member on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:39 PM

 Some French Muslims See Conspiracies In Paris Shootings

Quoting TerraIncognita: This article didnt give enough information for me to conclude anything. I'd like to know how many children were reported to have sat out of the moment of silence. Were the kids even interviewed or did the reporter just assume it was because they saw the attackers as heroes? It could be that a child did not want to honor a group of people who made it their business to mock the religion they hold dear. That doesn't mean they agreed with the killers. Or, it could be something entirely different.

 

QueenBarbie
by Silver Member on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:40 PM

 

Last week's shootings in Paris shocked the French. Many received another jolt when they learned that some Muslim schoolkids refused to join in the minute of national silence observed across the country following the Charlie Hebdo attacks.

The newspaper Le Figaro quoted one teacher in a heavily Muslim neighborhood in the eastern city of Strasbourg as saying that 80 percent of her students did not participate.

At the Pierre de Geyter Middle School in St. Denis, a largely Muslim suburb north of Paris, Iannis Roder has taught history for the last 15 years. He says the day after the killings at the Charlie Hebdo magazine, the school staff knew they would have problems.

"Our pupils - a minority - didn't want to do the minute of silence because they thought that Charlie Hebdo was a newspaper that didn't have the right to make these caricatures," says Roder.

Iannis Roder is a history teacher in the largely Muslim suburb of St. Denis, north of Paris. He said some of his students considered the Charlie Hebdo cartoons to be blasphemy and believed that Islam took precedence over French law. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Eleanor Beardsley/NPR
Iannis Roder is a history teacher in the largely Muslim suburb of St. Denis, north of Paris. He said some of his students considered the Charlie Hebdo cartoons to be blasphemy and believed that Islam took precedence over French law.

Iannis Roder is a history teacher in the largely Muslim suburb of St. Denis, north of Paris. He said some of his students considered the Charlie Hebdo cartoons to be blasphemy and believed that Islam took precedence over French law.

Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

Roder says the students called it blasphemy and he had to explain that blasphemy is a religious concept, and doesn't exist in French law.

"That was very difficult to explain because their point of view, their lives, are very religious. And they are convinced that the religion is above the law of the French Republic," he says.

Roder says nearly all the students thought the killings were wrong, but purely for religious reasons. He says he finds that worrisome.

France has some 5 million Muslims, the largest Muslim population in Western Europe. Muslim leaders have condemned the attacks and many ordinary Muslims are worried about being stigmatized. Since the killings at Charlie Hebdo and the kosher grocery there have have been incidents of vandalism at dozens of Muslim sites across the country.

Speaking in parliament, French Prime Minister Manuel Valls said it's not acceptable that Jews should live in fear in France or that Muslims should be ashamed. France welcomes both, he said. But many Muslims say there is a double standard. They say anti-Semitism is treated as a crime, while Islamophobia is tolerated.

Not far from the school in St. Denis is a housing project with soulless gray apartment buildings that have bars on the first-floor windows. Muslim immigrants came to live and work in places like this 40 years ago, when the economy was booming. Now the work has dried up, and the next generation feels stuck here.

In a corner convenience store, three men in their 30s are hanging out. I ask what they think about the Charlie Hebdo killings.

"I'm not saying what they did was good," Hakim Dridi says of the killers.

But, he adds, "those cartoonists shouldn't have been doing that. They know Muslims are practicing their religion and they should leave them alone. They provoked it and they knew it was coming because they had a bodyguard."

The men have been watching a video on a large computer screen behind the counter, which is showing the police assault last Friday on the kosher market, where one attacker was killed after he killed four Jews in the store.

The men watching the video believe it was staged.

They also say there's no way one of the Kouachi brothers who attacked Charlie Hebdo would have left his ID in the car.

The conspiracy theories pour out. One of the men says the two attacks were a plot by France, the U.S. and Israel to give Israel more power. They say it's unfair the world's media talks for weeks about Jewish deaths, but says nothing when Muslim children die.

Their narrative seems worlds away from the "Je Suis Charlie" demonstrations in Paris just a few miles away.

Back at the school, teacher Iannis Roder says he and his colleagues warned there was a problem in Paris suburb schools some 15 years ago, but nobody listened.

"Today, they open their eyes and say, 'Oh my God, there are people in France that don't share the values of the French Republic,'" he says. "For us, that's not a surprise, we knew that for a long time."

RandRMomma
by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:44 PM
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So? They didn't have to.
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