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S/O -- Teachers are role models.

Posted by on May. 7, 2015 at 9:24 AM
  • 21 Replies

In the "should she lose her job" post, many said that teachers are supposed to be role models and therefore are not allowed to make mistakes.  

I'm wondering where the line beteween "human" and "teacher" is drawn.  What do you truly expect from your children's teachers?  


Do you feel that all teachers are role models for the students they teach?  

If so, how would you explain different beliefs and values of a teacher to a student?  

Say, it's a government class and the teacher is for (or against) gay marriage and your belief system is different.  

Does that teacher still fit the role model you want for your children?  

What if the teacher is actually gay, and it's not something you believe in?  

Wiccan? 

Muslim?  

What if the teacher can be seen smoking outside of school hours -- is that role model behavior?  

What if the teacher was arrested at a protest? 

At what point are *we* the role models for our children and not pawning the job off on others? 

 

by on May. 7, 2015 at 9:24 AM
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Replies (1-10):
jcrew6
by Platinum Member on May. 7, 2015 at 9:51 AM
4 moms liked this

I expect my child's teachers to be professional while in school and teach them about math, science, language arts, history, and the electives we/they have chosen (ie PE, music, philosophy religion, etc)...

I am not looking for social lessons/agendas to be taught in school. Want to teach about social issues like sex, legalizing drugs, political leanings?  Make it an elective. Make it an extra curricular.  My children come home and share some of the most bizarre stories their teachers have shared with them (one math teacher spoke of getting arrested for "parking" with her boyfriend in high school.  My child's response to the teacher?  "Wow, that was inappropriate and awkward.  Now, can we get back to Pythagorean theorem?" 

What they do outside of school?  None of my business.  What they get arrested for? Honestly, none of my business (unless it involves a minor).  But, at school?  Keep it professional and stick to the curriculum.  


EireLass
by Ruby Member on May. 7, 2015 at 9:57 AM

For myself, my schooling was different than for my kids. I never "bonded" with any teacher, etc.

My kids, on the other hand....absolutely loved school, loved learning. There were certain teachers that they bonded to, and went to for other things outside of the lesson being taught. So yes, the teachers attitudes towards certain things does matter. Because they took on a role as teacher and "guidance" for my kids, it's important that they live a pretty clean life. 

idunno1234
by Platinum Member on May. 7, 2015 at 10:08 AM
1 mom liked this

Slightly off topic but related...

Most of us have had a memorable teacher, one who impacted us in a wonderful way, who inspired us.

I know I have.  I was lucky enough to have him twice, once in junior high and then after he moved to the high school.  He was more than a bit scary at times, consistently enthusiastic, totally unconventional, a class I never dared to cut or wanted to cut (yes, I cut a lot in high school because my top rated school made it easy, still got decent grades because that top rated school sucked), kids had utmost respect for him but not so much for most of the other teachers, some of whom were terrible.

My youngest has had a teacher like that as well, a science teacher in her elementary school who inspired her.  The following year in middle school her science teacher sucked and all inspiration went down the drain.

And that is the most common complaint my kids have had, a lot of mediocrity.  Teachers who don't know how to teach or they have stopped caring.

I am not denigrating the teaching profession.  I know what a tough, under appreciated job it is and its one I think few of us would be able to perform effectively. 

But I think all the time would if our schools were full of teachers like Mr. McCormick, my social studies teacher?  Would if our children were inspired in every subject by those who were talented inspirers?  Imagine what a difference that would make.

Sorry....back to topic.

Sisteract
by Whoopie on May. 7, 2015 at 10:21 AM

While in the classroom, I expected certain behaviors from a teacher.

PPCLC
by Lisa on May. 7, 2015 at 10:33 AM

While a teacher is someone to look up to in a child's life, and a part of the raising of that child in the sense of the education they provide (and I realize that writing THAT alone can make a parent cringe), they're also human. They have private lives, private political and religious leanings, and none of those things should ever have an impact on their students nor should it be the business of the parents.

Quoting anxiousschk:


Do you feel that all teachers are role models for the students they teach?  

If so, how would you explain different beliefs and values of a teacher to a student?  

Say, it's a government class and the teacher is for (or against) gay marriage and your belief system is different.  

Does that teacher still fit the role model you want for your children?  

What if the teacher is actually gay, and it's not something you believe in?  

Wiccan? 

Muslim?  

What if the teacher can be seen smoking outside of school hours -- is that role model behavior?  

What if the teacher was arrested at a protest? 

At what point are *we* the role models for our children and not pawning the job off on others? 



atlmom2
by Gold Member on May. 7, 2015 at 10:38 AM

Teachers are role models.  As much as I hate smoking, I don't care if they do.  Somethings don't matter, some do.  Some teachers are good role models, some are not.  Just like some people are and some are not.  We are human.  We all have our fav teachers and we have those we really hated.  

jamamama00
by on May. 7, 2015 at 10:42 AM
I would bet the a good deal of the parents screaming that the teacher should be fired are complete losers themselves. It's always the piece of shit parents who expect the world to raise their children for them.
Luvnlogic
by Platinum Member on May. 7, 2015 at 10:49 AM
I don't know. They academically influence our kids with what they teach and how they teach, but I doubt most kids are even aware of personal "flaws", ideals, or behaviors outside of the classroom until later in middle or high school. By then, your kids should be able to handle a discussion on the fallibility of humans and separating their job from their personal life. I think one time transgressions where no one was hurt can be used as a jumping off point for learning about choices, consequences, forgiveness, redemption, and change.
4evrinbluejeans
by KK on May. 7, 2015 at 10:54 AM

Teachers are absolutely role models but I've never been one to believe role models could never make a mistake.  We are all going to make mistakes at one time or another how we handle those mistakes and what we do to learn from them is important and is just as important lesson to children as teaching them to read, be kind, and strive to be the best they can be in the things they endeavor to do.  

I don't think children need to get all things from each person they look up to as a role model so the religion/belief system of teachers is of less importance to me because I don't believe that is an area they should strive to pass along to the children in their care at school.  

rsmom2511
by Bronze Member on May. 7, 2015 at 10:59 AM
It's funny, I am a teacher and I joke with my parents on parent night at the beginning of the school year that I promise not to believe everything their children tell me goes on at home if they try not to believe everything their kids say happens at school…! Lol..Sometimes a child's perspective is very different from the reality. But I do agree with 99% of your post 👍

Quoting jcrew6:

I expect my child's teachers to be professional while in school and teach them about math, science, language arts, history, and the electives we/they have chosen (ie PE, music, philosophy religion, etc)...

I am not looking for social lessons/agendas to be taught in school. Want to teach about social issues like sex, legalizing drugs, political leanings?  Make it an elective. Make it an extra curricular.  My children come home and share some of the most bizarre stories their teachers have shared with them (one math teacher spoke of getting arrested for "parking" with her boyfriend in high school.  My child's response to the teacher?  "Wow, that was inappropriate and awkward.  Now, can we get back to Pythagorean theorem?" 

What they do outside of school?  None of my business.  What they get arrested for? Honestly, none of my business (unless it involves a minor).  But, at school?  Keep it professional and stick to the curriculum.  

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