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S/O - What Were You Taught?

Posted by on Jun. 2, 2015 at 4:20 PM
  • 32 Replies

Another post got me thinking -

Think back to your middle, high school, and college days...

What were you taught about Native Americans, Columbus, Slavery, Civil War, the Holocaust, and the Civil Rights Movement? When did you learn of these things - the basics and then the truths and details?

If you did not go to school in the US, did you learn of these things? When?

“I don't think..." then you shouldn't talk, said the Hatter.”― Alice in Wonderland

by on Jun. 2, 2015 at 4:20 PM
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Pema_Jampa
by on Jun. 2, 2015 at 4:27 PM

U.S. history in middle school. Then 2 courses on U.S. history in college (most recent). European history college abroad in French. My textbooks in Louisiana were very different from those here in California. 


Pandora_13
by Bronze Member on Jun. 2, 2015 at 4:30 PM
To what extent in US History were you taught about the above topics in middle school?
Pema_Jampa
by on Jun. 2, 2015 at 4:36 PM
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Me? I personally feel like it was barely touched on. Most things glossed over if you will but it could have been just that time in my life. You know, young and didn't care about those sorts of things. 

I want to say we did econ in High school. 

The college classes I took aim to have the person understand not only what happened but what are the implications of said events and think about how times are changing and how our decisions now will be in the history books in the future. 

I have to run an errand real quick but I will be back soon..

Quoting Pandora_13: To what extent in US History were you taught about the above topics in middle school?


Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Jun. 2, 2015 at 5:36 PM
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Quoting Pandora_13:

Another post got me thinking - Think back to your middle, high school, and college days...What were you taught about Native Americans, Columbus, Slavery, Civil War, and the Civil Rights Movement? When did you learn of these things - the basics and then the truths and details? If you did not go to school in the US, did you learn of these things? When?

I didn't go to school in the USA.

I think Columbus might have been mentioned in passing.  None of the other stuff was mentioned.

I learned about them by reading.  I read a lot.

Carpy
by Emerald Member on Jun. 2, 2015 at 5:39 PM
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Roots was required watching in my 8th grade history. I had a very good history teacher in high school. We went in depth about all those issues.
turtle68
by Mahinaarangi on Jun. 2, 2015 at 6:15 PM
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I was schooled in three different countries and all of them touched on the subjects...basic stuff,  Native Americans as a general tribe, slavery was more about Lincoln freeing them, Civil war was not touched on much other than an afterthought of slavery...so it was seen more as southerners were arseholes for wanting slavery. Civil Rights was more about specific events rather than the legal side.

The truths about all didnt come to light until I was an adult and did my own research or was enlightened right here on CM.

LIMom1105
by on Jun. 2, 2015 at 6:21 PM
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I went to school in NJ, elementary school 70s, high school early 80s. We learned a fair amount about slavery and the Civil War, and the "nice" version of the Columbus story.. Next to nothing about the Civil Rights Movement or Native Anericans. We studied individual tribes, but not what happened to Native Americans in the U.S.
LGA1165
by on Jun. 2, 2015 at 6:33 PM
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In school-junior high-we learned the basic information about native Americans, Columbus,Civil War and all other political issues in history.However, the real truth about Columbus and Native Americans was not discussed in depth. I have learned a lot since then.

We were right in the middle of the Civil Rights era---I graduated in 1960 then went to college. I had a lot of excellent teachers in high school who were not afraid to discuss controversial issues.

In my sophomore year of college , I had a class in "race relations", we had students of all races and religions in the class and we discussed everything. We heard from students in our class --blacks, Asians, everyone talked about racism and prejudice. We had to write papers, we each interviewed one student chosen by the teacher  , talked together at length and wrote papers on the Interview. It was amazing.It was an excellent class.It opened my eyes and made me aware .Many of us made some good friends in that class.

I remember in 1966  that we were in Texas, after my DH graduated from OTS in San Antonio, we were on the way home,  eating lunch at a small cafe in Texas and they had a sign on the wall "We reserve the right to refuse service...." etc.I was so angry. I thought it should be illegal to be that racist.There WAS the Civil Rights act of 1964. They didn't care.

Unless you lived in those days, you don't know how crazy it was and how people felt. It was an emotionally charged atmosphere.Awful.

nanaofsix531
by on Jun. 2, 2015 at 6:33 PM

I really didn't learn much in middle school about U.S. History or gov. It was when I got to high school that I really got into it. U.S. History and U.S. Government fascinated me to no end. I went crazy at the library and learned everything I could. I go through spurts. I will read everything I can get my hands on about one subject for months and then pick another subject after that.The Holocaust,Presidents,The Titanic,Congress,Slavery. Right now I am reading Anita Hill's Speaking Truth To power. Just finished Robert Nay's Sideswiped, and Soloman Northup's Twelve Years A Slave. Just bought a bunch of books of Slave Diary's for summer reading.

 In high school I was lucky to have fantastic history and government teachers that always kept you interested and engaged and it just never wore off. 

PamR
by Ruby Member on Jun. 2, 2015 at 6:40 PM

I graduated high school in 1976, so I think I got the more sanitized version of American History. 

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