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Death makes us hate

Posted by on Mar. 22, 2016 at 10:56 AM
  • 53 Replies
According to terror management theory when thoughts of death become salient we show more aggression towards those we perceive in the out group and show favor to those in our ingroup.

This theory is being used to explain why we ostracize certain groups. Some recent studies have been looking at terrorism and how mortality salience in news and media makes people become more punitive towards Muslim groups. This can also be seen in cases where mortality salience is high and we are faced with law breakers. The more salient mortality is the more punitive we become.


Do you agree with this? Do you think that our mortality is being used against us so that we react and think in certain ways?
by on Mar. 22, 2016 at 10:56 AM
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BluesPagan2.0
by IWantTacos on Mar. 22, 2016 at 11:15 AM
Terror management theory was basically proven after 9/11. The racially motivated violence against specific minorities, such as the death of a Sikh man at the hands of an American who mistook him for a Muslim, prove that mortality salience makes us defensive. We must protect ourselves from death. How do we do this? Either through physical aggression or through following leaders who act as a shield against death. TMT attributes this need for protection to the popularity of George W. Bush after 9/11. The need for a charismatic and authoritarian leader is sought after more than an egalitarian and cooperative leader.
We commit the greatest evils to escape evil.


Agree? Disagree? Why?
meriana
by Platinum Member on Mar. 22, 2016 at 11:53 AM


I disagree. It's the deaths of innocent people, especially large numbers of innocent people, that affects us and I don't think it makes us defensive, it makes us vengeful. When an innocent person or a group of innocent people are killed, our first instinct tends to be to want the person(s) responsible to pay, that's a revenge reaction, not a defense one.


Whenever a person is killed, what we generally hear from the family and friends is that they want the perpetrator caught and punished and rightfully so. On the other hand, we aren't bothered by the killing of those we hold responsible. We were told that going into Iraq full force after 9/11 was due to their having WMD's and so was defensive but the first reaction was one of revenge, making those responsible pay for what they did and it unleashed what we now have. Even though actions may end up being defensive, they begin with a need for revenge, a desire to make whoever is responsible pay for what they did. Unfortunately it often ends up with even more innocent lives lost and more feeling the need for revenge and eventually defense.


BluesPagan2.0
by IWantTacos on Mar. 22, 2016 at 12:39 PM
Interesting perspective. I like that you differentiate between revenge and defense. Do you think that we are more altruistic in this area and not somewhat self centered when it comes to death? Do we not have a need to defend against the thought of our own demise by showing our brute force so that our legacy can live on?

Quoting meriana:

I disagree. It's the
deaths of innocent people, especially large numbers of innocent people, that
affects us and I don't think it makes us defensive, it makes us vengeful. When
an innocent person or a group of innocent people are killed, our first instinct
tends to be to want the person(s) responsible to pay, that's a revenge
reaction, not a defense one.

Whenever a person is
killed, what we generally hear from the family and friends is that they want
the perpetrator caught and punished and rightfully so. On the other hand, we
aren't bothered by the killing of those we hold responsible. We were told that going
into Iraq full force after 9/11 was due to their having WMD's and so was
defensive but the first reaction was one of revenge, making those responsible
pay for what they did and it unleashed what we now have. Even though actions
may end up being defensive, they begin with a need for revenge, a desire to make whoever is responsible pay for what they did. Unfortunately it often ends up with even more innocent lives lost and more feeling the need for revenge and eventually defense.



Carpy
by Emerald Member on Mar. 22, 2016 at 12:48 PM
1 mom liked this
I think it is common sense, human nature. A normal response to fear.
PinkButterfly66
by Platinum Member on Mar. 22, 2016 at 12:55 PM
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Not death, per se, but the violent aggression that leads to the death of innocents.  Righteous rage of the witnesses is a natural emotion, I would say from the reaction of mankind through history and from my own reaction when I hear about acts of violent acts of aggression in the news, or even when someone is injured at the hands of another for no reason (ie child or spousal abuse, child molestation).  It makes me want to have the power of a vengeful deity and strike them dead with a single blow.

BluesPagan2.0
by IWantTacos on Mar. 22, 2016 at 1:21 PM
1 mom liked this
Oh most definitely it's natural. The thing that sets us apart is our ability to consciously know that our mortality is inevitable. Due to this we set up certain constructs culturally and as individuals to protect against thoughts of the inevitability of death.

Quoting Carpy: I think it is common sense, human nature. A normal response to fear.
VooDooB
by The Corrupter on Mar. 22, 2016 at 1:24 PM

Hate gives us death.

JustCJ
by Gold Member on Mar. 22, 2016 at 1:27 PM
1 mom liked this

Ding Ding Ding

Quoting VooDooB:

Hate gives us death.


VooDooB
by The Corrupter on Mar. 22, 2016 at 1:33 PM
1 mom liked this

Progressive thinking is so back asswards.

Quoting JustCJ:

Ding Ding Ding

Quoting VooDooB:

Hate gives us death.


( You make people leave CM. You drive them away. There is a meaness and coldness in you that pushes people away and makes them cancel their CM accounts. I know a few of them. )

You are done here. 

LGAll65
by on Mar. 22, 2016 at 1:58 PM
I disagree with the theory presented.
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