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Adoptees suing birth parents

Posted by on Mar. 30, 2016 at 5:05 PM
KK
  • 98 Replies

I'm posting this story specifically for background on the question presented.  I'm not speaking to the validity to this man's claims or whether William Shatner is or isn't a good guy.  I'm not even saying that Shatner intentionally avoided supporting his child or that this guy isn't a con.  It's simply being shared for background on why this question came about.  

The question I would like to pose is should adoptees be able to sue birth parents for financial support/gain if they learn their identity and they can show their adoption led to a lower standard of living if they had been supported by their birth parent/s or in the case sited their denial led to emotional distress?  

While I'm not trying to quantify the number as I admit I don't know it, there does appear to be more than a few cases of birth father's choosing to sign away their parental rights to their biological children because they did not want them and do not want to be financially responsible for those children.  

Should family court take into consideration the financial ramifications that may come about if a parent is allowed to sign away their rights in order to avoid financial responsibility for the child?  


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http://www.cnn.com/2016/03/30/entertainment/william-shatner-paternity-suit-feat/index.html

William Shatner is being sued for $170 million by a Florida-based radio host who claims that the "Star Trek" actor is his father.

Peter Sloan, who now goes by the name Peter Shatner, says the actor had an affair with his birth mother, Katherine Burt (later Kathy McNeil), in 1956.
    Shatner denies that Sloan is his son.
    Sloan, 59, was given up for adoption shortly after his birth. In 1984, he started seeking his birth parents and identified the people he believed to be his mother and father.
    "Over the months that followed through a process of research and verification, Peter was able to identify his birth father as Canadian born William Shatner," according to petershatner.com, a website registered by Sloan.

    The lawsuit (PDF) states that Sloan met Shatner in November 1984 on the set of his TV series "T.J. Hooker." At the meeting, the lawsuit says, Shatner "admitted" he was Sloan's father, but when Sloan followed up with a phone call days later, Shatner "became agitated and hung-up the phone."
    A representative for Shatner called Sloan back and told him Shatner "is totally denying paternity at this point." Sloan suggested a DNA test but was "rebuffed," the suit says.
    Sloan established petershatner.com in 2009 and started a radio show in the Tampa area as "Peter Shatner."

    An attorney for William Shatner then contacted Sloan and told him that Shatner had "confirmed to me once again that he is not your father."
    Sloan alleges that Shatner's social media director posted "malicious, libelous and slanderous statements about the Plaintiff (Sloan) on Facebook and Twitter." He also says Twitter and IMDBPro have shut down accounts related to him.

    Sloan is seeking $30 million in compensatory damages, $90 million in punitive damages and $50 million for pain and suffering. He is also demanding a jury trial.

    CNN has reached out to Shatner's representatives for comment.
    by on Mar. 30, 2016 at 5:05 PM
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    Replies (1-10):
    BluesPagan2.0
    by IWantTacos on Mar. 30, 2016 at 5:08 PM
    Just take a DNA test. Then everyone will have a solid scientifically backed proof of paternity.
    4evrinbluejeans
    by KK on Mar. 30, 2016 at 5:09 PM

    That didn't address the question

    Quoting BluesPagan2.0: Just take a DNA test. Then everyone will have a solid scientifically backed proof of paternity.


    hart57
    by Bronze Member on Mar. 30, 2016 at 5:11 PM
    1 mom liked this
    I think a DNA test is need here to prove he is the father. But either way his mother put him up for adoption, dad didn't have much say 50 year ago.

    I don't think he is legally entitled to anything. He should be thankful he was adopted and had a family. It could of been worse. It would be nice if his dad is proven to be William helped him out, but I wouldn't say he is entitled the money.
    BluesPagan2.0
    by IWantTacos on Mar. 30, 2016 at 5:13 PM
    1 mom liked this
    Sorry, I skimmed through the article.

    As for your question I think that men need some kind of protection. Be omen have the choice to abort if they don't want a child. What choice does a man have? Honestly few if any. The only choice they have is signing away all rights and responsibilities. I think he should be allowed to do so and the financial ramifications shouldn't be considered.


    Quoting 4evrinbluejeans:

    That didn't address the question

    Quoting BluesPagan2.0: Just take a DNA test. Then everyone will have a solid scientifically backed proof of paternity.

    WaterorWine
    by Χριστιανός on Mar. 30, 2016 at 5:18 PM
    8 moms liked this
    No. If they are legally adopted then the birth parents have no legal financial obligation to them. It's shouldn't matter if their bio parents are rich or not.

    Now a deadbeat dad who abandons his kid born out of infidelity with no formal adoption in place is a different case.

    Ms.KitKat
    by on Mar. 30, 2016 at 5:26 PM
    9 moms liked this

    When a child is placed for adoption and parental rights are terminated (either voluntary or involuntary,)all rights even the right to inheritance is also terminated.

    When a child is adopted (the formal legal preceding whereby there is a judgment of adoption; this occurs anytime between days to months after placement witht he aparents depending on the state of birth/finalization) that child's adoptive parents have full responsibility in every way of the child "as if the child were born to them."

    This man has no right to inheritance from his birth father as all rights and responsibilities were severed at the time of termination of parental rights.

    Even if dna came back proving Shatner is the bfather, does not matter.

    It seems this man could benefit from therapy. 

    romalove
    by Roma on Mar. 30, 2016 at 5:29 PM
    12 moms liked this

    Let's assume Shatner is his biological father.

    So what?

    People are allowed to legally give up their children for adoption.

    His mother gave him up.  He was adopted.  He has parents.

    I don't think there's anything to sue for here.

    Furthermore....if Shatner's last name was Shatsky and no one ever heard of him and there wasn't any $$$ involved, he wouldn't be suing.

    I think the suit should be dismissed without merit.

    jjchick75
    by Silver Member on Mar. 30, 2016 at 5:29 PM
    1 mom liked this
    Exactly what I was going to say.

    Quoting Ms.KitKat:

    When a child is placed for adoption and parental rights are terminated (either voluntary or involuntary,)all rights even the right to inheritance is also terminated.

    When a child is adopted (the formal legal preceding whereby there is a judgment of adoption; this occurs anytime between days to months after placement witht he aparents depending on the state of birth/finalization) that child's adoptive parents have full responsibility in every way of the child "as if the child were born to them."

    This man has no right to inheritance from his birth father as all rights and responsibilities were severed at the time of termination of parental rights.

    Even if dna came back proving Shatner is the bfather, does not matter.

    It seems this man could benefit from therapy. 

    mrsary
    by Bronze Member on Mar. 30, 2016 at 5:31 PM
    No. Once a person is adopted their bio parents are no longer their parents.
    Mrs.KAZ
    by Gold Member on Mar. 30, 2016 at 5:33 PM
    1 mom liked this
    The birth mother signed her rights away when she gave him up for adoption also, is he using her? It would seem to me that it only matters that William Shattner may be his father, which means a big name and money.

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