Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Senate Bill Would Require Sex Ed to be LGBTQ-Inclusive, Medically Accurate

Posted by on Apr. 8, 2016 at 4:10 PM
  • 20 Replies
2 moms liked this

Senate Bill Would Require Sex Ed to be LGBTQ-Inclusive, Medically Accurate

 

A bill pending in the Senate could drastically improve the sad state of sex education in this country. On Thursday, Sen. Cory Booker, D-New Jersey, introduced the Real Education for Healthy Youth Act, which would provide funding for sex-ed teacher training and grants for education programs that address the needs of LGBTQ young people.

The bill has been percolating through the halls of Congress for a while. Democrats including Rep. Barbara Lee, D-California, brought it to the House in 2013, and Lee reintroduced it in March of last year. It’s the first piece of federal legislation to assert a young person’s right to comprehensive education about sexual health that includes information about dating violence, communication and decision-making, sexual assault, sexual harassment, and preventing pregnancy and STIs.

“Sexual health education that includes information beyond abstinence has been found to delay sexual intercourse, increase condom or contraceptive use, reduce the number of partners among young people, and decrease physical aggression with intimate partners,” Booker’s office noted in a press release.

Most U.S. states don’t mandate any kind of sex education, and only 13 states require that the information taught be medically accurate. Those lax requirements have paved the way for untrained or religiously motivated sex-ed teachers to use bizarre, inaccurate metaphors that imply that sex makes people dirty and unlovable. Some states even instruct their public-school sex-ed teachers to tell students that gay sex is immoral, against the law, and a surefire way to end up with AIDS.

If passed, REHYA would provide grants for teacher training and comprehensive sex education programs in K-12 schools and institutions of higher education. It would prohibit the use of federal grants for programs that promote gender stereotypes, suppress information about HIV/AIDS, teach any medically inaccurate information, or do not include accurate, sensitive information for LGBTQ youth and survivors of sexual abuse. REHYA would also allow schools to use these federal funds for contraception distribution.

The federal government currently spends $75 million on abstinence-only sex education, which President Barack Obama completely cut from his proposed 2017 budget. A majority of voters in almost every political and religious demographic group support comprehensive sex education, as do 88 percent of millennials. It’s a proven way to prevent new cases of sexually transmitted infections and teen pregnancy in a country that has one of the highest rates of both. This bill seems like a no-brainer, but considering how long it’s lingered in Congress without a vote, we’re checking our wild, naive fantasies of a country where schoolchildren aren’t told that their states hate them if they’re gay.

by on Apr. 8, 2016 at 4:10 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
UpSheRises
by Platinum Member on Apr. 8, 2016 at 4:13 PM
2 moms liked this
The federal government shouldn't micro-manage schools. I think it's a well intentioned mistake.
PamR
by Ruby Member on Apr. 8, 2016 at 4:20 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting UpSheRises: The federal government shouldn't micro-manage schools. I think it's a well intentioned mistake.

Given the high rates of pregnancy and STD's among teenagers in this country, isn't it better to have some sort of realistic program in place, even if the federal government manages it?  So many states won't go past abstinence-only sex ed (and they have the highest rates), and obviously, a lot of kids aren't learning what they need to know at home. 

UpSheRises
by Platinum Member on Apr. 8, 2016 at 4:30 PM
No, Not at all. It wastes money by adding layers of red tape and encourages corruption. Tax dollars ate much better spent and people are much better served by local governments. Also, teen pregnancy rates are dropping steadily and have been for 2 decades.

I'm not a government nanny kind of person. I don't think our government is capable of solving any problems.

Quoting PamR:

Quoting UpSheRises: The federal government shouldn't micro-manage schools. I think it's a well intentioned mistake.

Given the high rates of pregnancy and STD's among teenagers in this country, isn't it better to have some sort of realistic program in place, even if the federal government manages it?  So many states won't go past abstinence-only sex ed (and they have the highest rates), and obviously, a lot of kids aren't learning what they need to know at home. 

WaterorWine
by Χριστιανός on Apr. 8, 2016 at 4:34 PM
1 mom liked this
I have no problem with it being an elective class. Parents should have to sign permission slips. If it's just the facts then there should be no moral statements made one way or the other. So no "gay is wrong" statements or "gay is perfectly healthy and good" statements. Just state the mechanics of it all.

And I disagree with passing out contraception. That is not a school's place whatsoever. That is a parenting call based on their personal values.
cupcake7734
by Bronze Member on Apr. 8, 2016 at 4:36 PM

 What use is sex ed if it's not required to be medically accurate? We shouldn't have students enter the 'real world', only to realize 'f*ck, my teachers lied to me!'

..MoonShine..
by Redwood Witch on Apr. 8, 2016 at 6:07 PM
2 moms liked this
Being gay IS perfectly normal and healthy...it only becomes a moral statement when one is a part of a religion that makes it so. Other wise, where human sexuality is concerned, it is simply a statement of fact.

I'm not sure how I feel about the federal government instating this, but I also wish some states would get their heads out of their asses and implement comprehensive sex ed programs. I don't know that having some federal standards in place is a bad thing.


Quoting WaterorWine: I have no problem with it being an elective class. Parents should have to sign permission slips. If it's just the facts then there should be no moral statements made one way or the other. So no "gay is wrong" statements or "gay is perfectly healthy and good" statements. Just state the mechanics of it all.

And I disagree with passing out contraception. That is not a school's place whatsoever. That is a parenting call based on their personal values.
WaterorWine
by Χριστιανός on Apr. 8, 2016 at 7:41 PM
It's not the government's place to dispense morality or values. This goes along with encouraging kids to masturbate or have sex with their peers by telling them is healthy and normal. All of that falls under parenting. People can agree or disagree and teach THEIR kids according to their values. So yes, teaching values contrary to a child's religious beliefs is not acceptable. Schools need to be objective and neutral, stick with the mechanics/risks of various sex acts And definitions of terms, that is my point.

Quoting ..MoonShine..: Being gay IS perfectly normal and healthy...it only becomes a moral statement when one is a part of a religion that makes it so. Other wise, where human sexuality is concerned, it is simply a statement of fact.





I'm not sure how I feel about the federal government instating this, but I also wish some states would get their heads out of their asses and implement comprehensive sex ed programs. I don't know that having some federal standards in place is a bad thing.


Quoting WaterorWine: I have no problem with it being an elective class. Parents should have to sign permission slips. If it's just the facts then there should be no moral statements made one way or the other. So no "gay is wrong" statements or "gay is perfectly healthy and good" statements. Just state the mechanics of it all.





And I disagree with passing out contraception. That is not a school's place whatsoever. That is a parenting call based on their personal values.
D-Town
by Platinum Member on Apr. 8, 2016 at 7:46 PM
2 moms liked this

I think it's sad that we have to have legislation to educate our children on facts and how not to be asshats

D-Town
by Platinum Member on Apr. 8, 2016 at 7:50 PM

From a factual point of view, masterbation and sex is a normal part of life. Humans are driven to have sex and masterbation is part of that drive. To make the claim that it is not normal part of life and a "parenting" issue is attempting to inject your own morality into the subject rather than present factual information. 


And if they are having sex, I would hope they are having it with their peers and not the toddlers some religions deem to be "moral and acceptable."  (cough cough) Christians (cough cough) 

Quoting WaterorWine: It's not the government's place to dispense morality or values. This goes along with encouraging kids to masturbate or have sex with their peers by telling them is healthy and normal. All of that falls under parenting. People can agree or disagree and teach THEIR kids according to their values. So yes, teaching values contrary to a child's religious beliefs is not acceptable. Schools need to be objective and neutral, stick with the mechanics/risks of various sex acts And definitions of terms, that is my point.
Quoting ..MoonShine..: Being gay IS perfectly normal and healthy...it only becomes a moral statement when one is a part of a religion that makes it so. Other wise, where human sexuality is concerned, it is simply a statement of fact. I'm not sure how I feel about the federal government instating this, but I also wish some states would get their heads out of their asses and implement comprehensive sex ed programs. I don't know that having some federal standards in place is a bad thing.
Quoting WaterorWine: I have no problem with it being an elective class. Parents should have to sign permission slips. If it's just the facts then there should be no moral statements made one way or the other. So no "gay is wrong" statements or "gay is perfectly healthy and good" statements. Just state the mechanics of it all. And I disagree with passing out contraception. That is not a school's place whatsoever. That is a parenting call based on their personal values.


___________________________________________________

And then he thought: Is this how idiots rationalize their stupidity to themselves?

― Orson Scott Card, Ender's Shadow
pinkcoffeecup
by Bronze Member on Apr. 8, 2016 at 7:55 PM

I don't  believe sex ed in any form.  Should be required in school. 

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)