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Heroin deaths surpass gun homicides for the first time..

Posted by on Dec. 11, 2016 at 1:02 PM
  • 67 Replies

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/12/08/heroin-deaths-surpass-gun-homicides-for-the-first-time-cdc-data-show/?utm_term=.20c7a9a86c69

Hoping this is clickable...if not...anyone who can help...I would appreciate it!

by on Dec. 11, 2016 at 1:02 PM
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Replies (1-10):
SuG4
by Firestarter on Dec. 11, 2016 at 1:28 PM
I couldn't click on it. I'm mobile, but I'll see if I can find it.
SuG4
by Firestarter on Dec. 11, 2016 at 1:38 PM
It's an epidemic brought on by the DEA's tightening of narcotic prescriptions. So those who were already abusing these drugs turned to heroin.
PinkButterfly66
by Platinum Member on Dec. 11, 2016 at 1:58 PM
2 moms liked this

Exept those heroine deaths were individual and they didn't take any innocent victims with them.  

SuG4
by Firestarter on Dec. 11, 2016 at 2:01 PM
2 moms liked this
HELLO!

Quoting PinkButterfly66:

Exept those heroine deaths were individual and they didn't take any innocent victims with them.  

SuG4
by Firestarter on Dec. 11, 2016 at 2:10 PM
3 moms liked this
In both instances, families are devastated by gun violence, AND drug abuse!
SuG4
by Firestarter on Dec. 11, 2016 at 2:24 PM
Your welcome! Now maybe some fine mom will copy and paste the article on your post. It's an important topic!:-)

Quoting btamilee2750:

Thank you :-)

Quoting SuG4: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.washingtonpost.com/amphtml/news/wonk/wp/2016/12/08/heroin-deaths-surpass-gun-homicides-for-the-first-time-cdc-data-show/

MrsHMS
by Silver Member on Dec. 11, 2016 at 2:40 PM
3 moms liked this
Heroin deaths surpass gun homicides for the first time, CDC data shows

By Christopher Ingraham
December 8, 2016 at 3:50 PM


Opioid deaths continued to surge in 2015, surpassing 30,000 for the first time in recent history, according to CDC data released Thursday.

That marks an increase of nearly 5,000 deaths from 2014. Deaths involving powerful synthetic opiates, like fentanyl, rose by nearly 75 percent from 2014 to 2015.


Heroin deaths spiked too, rising by more than 2,000 cases. For the first time since at least the late 1990s, there were more deaths due to heroin than to traditional opioid painkillers, like hydrocodone and oxycodone.

"The epidemic of deaths involving opioids continues to worsen," said CDC Director Tom Frieden in a statement. "Prescription opioid misuse and use of heroin and illicitly manufactured fentanyl are intertwined and deeply troubling problems."

In the CDC's opioid death data, deaths may involve more than one individual drug category, so numbers in the chart above aren't mutually exclusive. Many opioid fatalities involve a combination of drugs, often multiple types of opioids, or opioids in conjunction with other sedative substances like alcohol.


In a grim milestone, more people died from heroin-related causes than from gun homicides in 2015. As recently as 2007, gun homicides outnumbered heroin deaths by more than 5 to 1.


These increases come amid a year-over-year increase in mortality across the board, resulting in the first decline in American life expectancy since 1993.

Congress recently passed a spending bill containing $1 billion to combat the opioid epidemic, including money for addiction treatment and prevention.

"The prescription opioid and heroin epidemic continues to devastate communities and families across the country—in large part because too many people still do not get effective substance use disorder treatment,” said Michael Botticelli, Director of National Drug Control Policy, in a statement. "That is why the President has called since February for $1 billion in new funding to expand access to treatment."

Much of the current opioid predicament stems from the explosion of prescription painkiller use in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Widespread painkiller use led to many Americans developing dependencies on the drugs. When various authorities at the state and federal levels began issuing tighter restrictions on painkillers in the late 2000s, much of that demand shifted over to the illicit market, feeding the heroin boom of the past several years.



The Drug Enforcement Administration warns people about the dangers of Fentanyl, a synthetic opiod that can be 40 to 50 times stronger than heroin. (Drug Enforcement Administration)
Drug policy reformers say the criminalization of illicit and off-label drug use is a barrier to reversing the growing epidemic.

“Criminalization drives people to the margins and dissuades them from getting help,” said Grant Smith, deputy director of national affairs at the Drug Policy Alliance. “It drives a wedge between people who need help and the services they need. Because of criminalization and stigma, people hide their addictions from others.”


Christopher Ingraham writes about politics, drug policy and all things data. He previously worked at the Brookings Institution and the Pew Research Center.


MrsHMS
by Silver Member on Dec. 11, 2016 at 2:42 PM
I know 3 people shot and 3 people who OD. 2 on heroin one on oxicodon.
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