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WOW!!! Very moving and emotional.

Posted by on Aug. 4, 2017 at 12:09 PM
  • 15 Replies
7 moms liked this


by on Aug. 4, 2017 at 12:09 PM
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Replies (1-10):
meriana
by Platinum Member on Aug. 4, 2017 at 12:25 PM
1 mom liked this

What a neat memorial. A small bit of a families history that began in oppression and whose descendant has had a huge impact on the entire country.

Debmomto2teens
by Platinum Member on Aug. 4, 2017 at 12:37 PM
1 mom liked this

That gave me chills.  

iwashere
by on Aug. 4, 2017 at 12:41 PM
1 mom liked this

That was awesome. Thank you for sharing.

M4LG5
by Bronze Member on Aug. 4, 2017 at 12:41 PM
1 mom liked this

Right??  This literally took my breath away. 

Quoting Debmomto2teens:

That gave me chills.  


LGAll65215
by on Aug. 4, 2017 at 12:42 PM
1 mom liked this
That's awesome and inspiring!
Thanks for posting!
hotspice58
by Bronze Member on Aug. 4, 2017 at 12:50 PM
1 mom liked this

Very moving!

motherslove82
by Gold Member on Aug. 4, 2017 at 12:53 PM
1 mom liked this
That's really interesting.
free1
by ~FreeSpirit~ on Aug. 4, 2017 at 1:43 PM
1 mom liked this

Interesting history. Thanks for posting.

free1
by ~FreeSpirit~ on Aug. 4, 2017 at 2:00 PM

I found some more info on the website.


From Slavery to the Whitehouse






Kingston...
A Crossroads of History

​​The city of Kingston, located in northwest Georgia, has long served as a crossroads of history. Settlement by indigenous peoples dates back for perhaps two thousand years to the Woodland Period. By the early nineteenth century, Cherokee had settled in the area and, in addition to farming, had begun mining saltpeter, an ingredient used in gunpowder, from a nearby cave. Following the 1832 land lottery and the forcible removal of the Cherokee, white settlers moved in, bringing with them a population of enslaved African Americans. The settlement thrived as a stagecoach stop before the arrival of the Western & Atlantic Railroad in the 1840s. The city of Kingston, named after a railroad financier, was established in 1850.


By the time of the Civil War, Kingston was a small hub fueled by cotton production and tourism. The town was an important medical and supply center because of its easy access to railroad lines. The Great Locomotive Chase came through Kingston, as did General William Tecumseh Sherman on his infamous March to the Sea. The city emerged from the war as an important supply distribution site. The railroad kept Kingston afloat during the waning years of the nineteenth century. The town was bypassed, however, as automobiles replaced trains in the early twentieth century. Rich in history, Kingston is today poised for rediscovery.


Prior to settling in Kingston, GA, where Melvinia Shields spent the remainder of her days, she lived just south of Atlanta in Rex.  There a monument also honors the inspiring five-generation journey of First Lady Michelle Obama's ancestry from slavery to the White House. Born into slavery in 1844, Melvinia Shields was relocated at the age of 6 from South Carolina to a farm in the area presently known as Rex, Clayton County, Georgia. A story that surpasses the boundaries of race and culture, the Melvinia Shields Monument is a place that invites all people to discover how the heritage and diversity of the African American experience has shaped America's modern history. Learn more about Rex.

Rex Monument

The Story

Among the city's residents in the late 1800's was Melvinia Shields.  Born into slavery in South Carolina in 1844, Melvinia was bequeather to Henry Shields, who lived in Clayton County, GA, in 1850.  Ten years later she gave birth to a son, Dolphus Shields, who was fathered by Henry's son, Charles.  Melvinia eventually moved to Kingston where she became part of a vibrant African-American community.  Melvinia died in 1938, and is buried in the cemetery at Queens Chapel Methodist Church.

During the more than four decades that she lived in Kingston, Melvinia worked as a midwife, a job that made her a pillar of the black community. Melvinia aided in the birth of countless children as well as caring for her grandchildren and other relatives. Her son Dolphus moved to Birmingham, where he started a family and became a successful businessman. Eventually his descendants settled in Chicago, where his great-great-granddaughter, Michelle Robinson, was born. Michelle later married Barack Obama, who in 2008 was elected president of the United States.


Click here for detailed story and family tree.

Members of the Shields family in Clayton County. Third from the right (standing) is Charles Shields, the likely father of Melvinia’s children.

VooDooB
by The Corruptor on Aug. 4, 2017 at 2:01 PM

Ah yes. The Melvinia Shields Monument.

Welll, since it mentions slavery it should probably be torn down, right?


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