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Trump Silent As Alt-Right Nazis Carry Out Acts Of Violence Against Protesters In Charlottesville

Posted by on Aug. 12, 2017 at 12:07 PM
  • 110 Replies


Trump Silent As Alt-Right Nazis Carry Out Acts Of Violence Against Protesters In Charlottesville

As counter-protesters have taken to the streets in Charlottesville, VA to stand up against the KKK and neo-Nazi alt-right racism and hate, violence has broken out against those who are standing against racism and bigotry. Meanwhile, Donald Trump golfs in New Jersey and stays silent.

Trump Silent As Alt-Right Nazis Carry Out Acts Of Violence Against Protesters In Charlottesville

As counter-protesters have taken to the streets in Charlottesville, VA to stand up against the KKK and neo-Nazi alt-right racism and hate, violence has broken out against those who are standing against racism and bigotry. Meanwhile, Donald Trump golfs in New Jersey and stays silent.

Here was the scene in Charlottesville, VA on Friday night as white supremacists marched:

White supremacists are terrorizing the people of , but still no condemnation from @realDonaldTrump, @VP, @SpeakerRyan.

Here’s video of the protesters chanting, “No Trump, no KKK, no fascist USA” on Saturday morning:

https://twitter.com/notrivia/status/896373211604144132/video/1

One of the alt-right trolls started knocking down protesters, as things have already gotten violent:

https://twitter.com/notrivia/status/896373211604144132/video/1

The person was a white supremacist who injured peaceful demonstrators and then fled from the police.

The live stream of the defense of Charlottesville, VA:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHKwn0LtOChTCFEQmQ7Lndw/live

The Trump administration and the Republican Party have remained silent as the race based violence that they have enabled is boiling over in one of America’s most storied college towns.

This is Donald Trump’s America, and any blood shed today will be on Republican hands.

by on Aug. 12, 2017 at 12:07 PM
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Pema_Jampa
by Ruby Member on Aug. 12, 2017 at 12:16 PM

WATCH: White nationalists chant ‘Jews will not replace us’ as they march with torches in Virginia


Los Angeles Times

Tribune Content Agency

Chanting "blood and soil," "white lives matter" and "you will not replace us," scores of white nationalists holding torches marched across the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville on Friday night.

Scuffles broke out between them and a small group of counter-protesters calling themselves "anti-fascists" who were surrounded as they demonstrated in advance of Saturday's "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, which is expected to be one of the largest far-right gatherings in the U.S. in at least a decade.

Police soon cleared away the demonstrators, according to reporters at the scene.

"The fear we instill in them today only fuels our victory tomorrow," one rally supporter wrote on Twitter, in a message retweeted by Richard Spencer, one of the nation's most prominent white nationalists, who is attending the weekend's events in Virginia.

Spencer also tweeted a selfie, showing him smiling with the marchers' tiki torches in the background.

"I am safe. I am not fine," one of the counter-protesters, Emily Gorcenski, tweeted, saying that white nationalists had attacked her group. "What I just witnessed was the end of America."

Pictures and video of the nighttime march spread rapidly across social media, where many black and left-leaning Americans expressed disgust at the imagery, which to them recalled torch-lit Ku Klux Klan rallies of yesteryear.

"This is a disgrace," tweeted Martese Johnson, a black University of Virginia alumnus who gained notoriety in 2015 when he was bloodied by police as a student. "I do not believe this is happening on my university's campus." (The university is currently between its summer and fall semesters, when more students would be on campus.)

Charlottesville's mayor expressed outrage at the gathering of white nationalists, who at one point stopped to pay tribute to a statue of Thomas Jefferson, a founding father who owned slaves.

"When I think of candlelight, I want to think of prayer vigils," wrote Mayor Mike Signer in a Facebook post.

"Today, in 2017," he continued, "we are instead seeing a cowardly parade of hatred, bigotry, racism, and intolerance march" in the hometown "of the architect of our Bill of Rights."

Noting that everyone has a First Amendment right of assembly and free speech, he said, "Here's mine: Not only as the Mayor of Charlottesville, but as a UVA faculty member and alumnus, I am beyond disgusted by this unsanctioned and despicable display of visual intimidation on a college campus."

For weeks, white nationalists, neo-Nazis and other far-right figures have been preparing for Saturday's rally, occasionally running into obstacles as the home-rental company Airbnb banned far-right users for violating the company's anti-racism policies.

The city had also objected to the demonstrators' hoped-for gathering spot — the formerly named Lee Park, where the city has ordered the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The city sought to block the rally at the park now called Emancipation Park.

The American Civil Liberties Union and the Rutherford Institute, a civil liberties and human rights group based in Charlottesville, filed a lawsuit Thursday against the city on behalf of the rally organizers. The suit said that the city was unconstitutionally infringing on the demonstrators' First Amendment rights by directing them to go to a different park.

The city contended that its request wasn't prompted by the white nationalists' political beliefs, but because the one-acre Emancipation Park would be too small for the number of demonstrators expected to arrive in the city on Saturday.

But Friday night, a judge sided with the white nationalists and ordered the city to allow them to gather in Emancipation Park, where local leaders promise to have hundreds of law enforcement officials monitoring events.

Pema_Jampa
by Ruby Member on Aug. 12, 2017 at 12:20 PM


‘Gotta go, gotta go!’: Black pastor bolts Joy Reid live interview as white nationalists attack fellow pastors

                


During a live-feed interview with MSNBC host Joy Reid, a black minister who was one of the counter-protesters at a white nationalist march in Charlottesville, Virginia suddenly had to bolt from the screen as her fellow pastors and other counter-protesters were attacked.

Host Reid was interviewing Rev. Traci Blackmon about the march when a security guard grabbed her and pulled her off-screen as she screamed, “Gotta go, gotta,” as fights broke out nearby her.

A stunned Reid, blurted, ‘Oh my goodness!”

“I don’t know what is happening here, I don’t know what just happen there had with our guest but we’re going to try to find out what happened,” Reid attempted to explain. And she was standing at the location where it looks like now violence has broken out among the crowd and for those who are unfamiliar with what’s going on today in Charlottesville. Make sure our producers check on Reverend Blackmon and make sure she’s okay, if somebody could please text her.”

Reid later spoke with with Blackmon who said she was safe but that police were asking them to leave for their own safety.

Watch the dramatic video below via MSNBC:


couture-mommy
by 8.21.1831 on Aug. 12, 2017 at 12:26 PM
6 moms liked this
He helped this... why the fuck WOULD he say something?
He didnt mention the mosque bombing either.

🤔
squeekers
by Silver Member on Aug. 12, 2017 at 12:29 PM
4 moms liked this
Trumpy won't go against his fan base.

Quoting Pema_Jampa:

WATCH: White nationalists chant ‘Jews will not replace us’ as they march with torches in Virginia


Los Angeles Times

Tribune Content Agency

Chanting "blood and soil," "white lives matter" and "you will not replace us," scores of white nationalists holding torches marched across the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville on Friday night.



Scuffles broke out between them and a small group of counter-protesters calling themselves "anti-fascists" who were surrounded as they demonstrated in advance of Saturday's "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, which is expected to be one of the largest far-right gatherings in the U.S. in at least a decade.

Police soon cleared away the demonstrators, according to reporters at the scene.

"The fear we instill in them today only fuels our victory tomorrow," one rally supporter wrote on Twitter, in a message retweeted by Richard Spencer, one of the nation's most prominent white nationalists, who is attending the weekend's events in Virginia.

Spencer also tweeted a selfie, showing him smiling with the marchers' tiki torches in the background.

"I am safe. I am not fine," one of the counter-protesters, Emily Gorcenski, tweeted, saying that white nationalists had attacked her group. "What I just witnessed was the end of America."

Pictures and video of the nighttime march spread rapidly across social media, where many black and left-leaning Americans expressed disgust at the imagery, which to them recalled torch-lit Ku Klux Klan rallies of yesteryear.

"This is a disgrace," tweeted Martese Johnson, a black University of Virginia alumnus who gained notoriety in 2015 when he was bloodied by police as a student. "I do not believe this is happening on my university's campus." (The university is currently between its summer and fall semesters, when more students would be on campus.)

Charlottesville's mayor expressed outrage at the gathering of white nationalists, who at one point stopped to pay tribute to a statue of Thomas Jefferson, a founding father who owned slaves.

"When I think of candlelight, I want to think of prayer vigils," wrote Mayor Mike Signer in a Facebook post.

"Today, in 2017," he continued, "we are instead seeing a cowardly parade of hatred, bigotry, racism, and intolerance march" in the hometown "of the architect of our Bill of Rights."

Noting that everyone has a First Amendment right of assembly and free speech, he said, "Here's mine: Not only as the Mayor of Charlottesville, but as a UVA faculty member and alumnus, I am beyond disgusted by this unsanctioned and despicable display of visual intimidation on a college campus."



For weeks, white nationalists, neo-Nazis and other far-right figures have been preparing for Saturday's rally, occasionally running into obstacles as the home-rental company Airbnb banned far-right users for violating the company's anti-racism policies.

The city had also objected to the demonstrators' hoped-for gathering spot — the formerly named Lee Park, where the city has ordered the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The city sought to block the rally at the park now called Emancipation Park.

The American Civil Liberties Union and the Rutherford Institute, a civil liberties and human rights group based in Charlottesville, filed a lawsuit Thursday against the city on behalf of the rally organizers. The suit said that the city was unconstitutionally infringing on the demonstrators' First Amendment rights by directing them to go to a different park.

The city contended that its request wasn't prompted by the white nationalists' political beliefs, but because the one-acre Emancipation Park would be too small for the number of demonstrators expected to arrive in the city on Saturday.

But Friday night, a judge sided with the white nationalists and ordered the city to allow them to gather in Emancipation Park, where local leaders promise to have hundreds of law enforcement officials monitoring events.

ILive4This
by Robin on Aug. 12, 2017 at 12:30 PM
6 moms liked this

That's his base, baby!

Disgusting, filthy, deplorable "people"

Luvnlogic
by Platinum Member on Aug. 12, 2017 at 12:34 PM
4 moms liked this
What a gross display of ignorance going on there. 😡 While a presidential statement condemning this ideology would be awesome, I don't think I'll be holding my breath waiting for it.
Geminirising
by on Aug. 12, 2017 at 12:34 PM
4 moms liked this

I wouldn't expect him to say anything. Those people kept him rich and won him the Presidency. 

Digusting

Pema_Jampa
by Ruby Member on Aug. 12, 2017 at 12:36 PM
1 mom liked this

It's a good opportunity to prove he does not support this. But I think you are right. Doubt we will get a comment condemning this.

Quoting Luvnlogic: What a gross display of ignorance going on there. 😡 While a presidential statement condemning this ideology would be awesome, I don't think I'll be holding my breath waiting for it.


Mommy_Bee_
by Bronze Member on Aug. 12, 2017 at 12:37 PM
Of course. Nothing to sway his minions. It might ruin the administrations plans.
nb34
by Platinum Member on Aug. 12, 2017 at 12:38 PM
2 moms liked this

He wishes he could be there right by their side. These are his people, his kind.

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